Ceiling Fans: Backward, Right?

martel Posted By martel, Sep 30, 2006 at 3:19 PM

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  1. begreen

    begreen
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    Ever ridden in a cold-air balloon?

    Hot air balloons are based on a very basic scientific principle: warmer air rises in cooler air. Essentially, hot air is lighter than cool air, because it has less mass per unit of volume. A cubic foot of air weighs roughly 28 grams (about an ounce). If you heat that air by 100 degrees F, it weighs about 7 grams less.
     
  2. begreen

    begreen
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    I think we're both right and I love the reference to R & B, they're my favorites. I forgot about Upsadasium.

    Cold air is more dense. Add gravity and one gets more weight. Cold air is heavier than warm air. Or for a more interesting physics discussion, I like this explanation:
    According to statistical mechanics, where air has greater kinetic energy it has a greater probability to occupy a higher gravitational potential than less energenic air. That is, the system tends toward maximal entropy.
    http://www.physicsforums.com/archive/index.php/t-32331.html

    http://travel.howstuffworks.com/hot-air-balloon.htm
    http://ezinearticles.com/?Why-Does-Cold-Air-Fall-and-Warm-Air-Rise?&id=302338

    Lot's of differing opinions to be sure.
     
  3. kevinlp

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    I'll try it the otherway Marty and see if that is better. It makes sense.
     
  4. Martin Strand III

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    Kevin:

    I try not to do things against Mother Nature.

    What makes sense to you is nonsense to me.

    Aye,
    Marty
     
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