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Chain saw accident

Post in 'The Gear' started by colebrookman, Nov 27, 2009.

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  1. colebrookman

    colebrookman Minister of Fire

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    News from firefighter close calls .com
    A GRIM REMINDER:
    We rarely post information related to law officers losing their life, only because that isn't our mission-however, when we can relate-we do pass it on. In this case, an off-duty Bow (N.H.) P.O. was killed this week in a chain-saw accident at his Epsom (N.H.) home, leaving behind his wife and his 4-year-old daughter. This was passed on to us by a friend of his who is a FF and Secret List member. As he stated in his e-mail: "In short, he was using his chain saw when it kicked-back, causing his death-a reminder to all of us of the need for (protection) PPE, especially since we (Firefighters) use chainsaws often and complacency (for any of us) is a moments away. Our sincere condolences to the friends and family of Officer Nathan Taylor.
    HERE is a video report: http://www.wmur.com/video/21720131/index.html
    But for the grace of God go I. May he rest in peace. Be safe.
    Ed

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  2. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

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    So... trying to learn from this. I couldn't get the video to load. What PPE would have helped in this case? Any specific lessons to be learned?
  3. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    Are kickbacks more likely with full chisel chain than safety chain?
  4. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    Chainsaw kicked back and caught him in the chest according to the video so I think a vest would have helped.
  5. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    yes,and the way it sounds it got him in the chest noway to know what happen? My guess is he was using it up above head level.
  6. ROBERT F

    ROBERT F Minister of Fire

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    Yep, and larger diameter bar ends too.
  7. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    The safety chain is less likely to kickback. I think the key is to stay out of a situation that can cause a kick back. I try not to pinch the bar by watching what the cut is doing, stay away from cutting with the tip, don't make cuts where the tip will cut into another log and always try to stand along side the cut and not behind it.
  8. Mr. Kelly

    Mr. Kelly Member

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    Boy, does that news suck. To think of it... something that so many people do with regularity could be so catastrophic.

    My heart and prayers go out to his family. What loss. His daughter's life will be never the same. Sometimes the world is a cruel place. Makes the need for us to feel the good in the world even stronger.
  9. creeker

    creeker New Member

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    Wow. Sobering. I've gotten so into the whole wood-burning frame of mind. It's addictive. The wood, the stove, cutting, splitting,
    seasoning, burning. It's a lifestyle. Then you hear something like this. Make you think to slow down. Take it one step at at time. Think about what's not worth doing as a shortcut or a convenience. It can happen to any one of us. Especially newbies (like me) who don't really have good mentors to kick us in the butt or laugh at us for doing stupid things. I'm sorry for this guy and his family. I'll think about him when I pull that cord, in the spirit of burning, and staying alive.
  10. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    None.

    And the lesson is watch the tip of your bar.
  11. travelindog

    travelindog New Member

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    Not too long ago I purchased a Stihl 361. For $50 over the standard model, I was able to get the Q model which contains an additional chain brake. Brake activates when the right hand is released from the handle. Love this feature and would recommend it. I always watch the cut and the saw tip with no distraction, but this safety feature and ppe seem like good measures in case a mistake is made.
  12. btuser

    btuser Minister of Fire

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    Its big news around here, just 10 minutes from here. I got the razzin' during Thanksgiving, all the women hen-pecking me about it. I think I'm going to be getting a set of chaps for Chrismas.
  13. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    hummm I like that redundant trigger hand Q brake that travelindog ^^mentioned.

    Also I'm thinking it had to be a small saw ...like a 16" or smaller to bite him in the chest like that. imo, and I don't claim to be a great thinker on saw safety either, the longer saws are safer kick back wise. That observation is based only on my experience using 16,20,24" saws.

    We still have a 16" 041 Stihl I got in 77 that runs real sweet but I'm less inclined to use it cause it doesn't have a chain brake unlike the 2 Huskeys. If the 24" didn't have a chain break I'd have no problem using that cause a kick back with that would way less likely lead to a catastrophic consequence like a 16" bar.
  14. drewboy

    drewboy New Member

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    Savageactor7 - I'm just curious as to why a smaller saw has more of a chance of a kickback. Is it because it's lighter or that the tip of the blade is more likely to get pinched?

    Rob
  15. Ken45

    Ken45 Minister of Fire

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    My feeling is the opposite, small, less powerful saws are less likely to seriously kick back. When they do kick back, it's easily controllable with your hands. The big ones have more power to overcome you. Of course chain saws are plain dangerous and one needs to stay alert.

    I agree with you about the old saws. I have a couple of powerful 1970's saws (a Farmboss 041 and a Homelight XL) that only get brought out for big trees. They don't have chain brakes and they keep spinning when the throttle is released. (I wonder if I could get a decent trade in for the pair towards a modern equivalent saw?)

    I feel my Stihl MS-170 (14") is easy to handle for limbing and small stuff, with the Husky (18") being more powerful but still reasonably safe.

    Remember, a big saw will tire you out and when you are tired you are more likely to get careless.
  16. btuser

    btuser Minister of Fire

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    We don't know what kind of saw he was using. My dad gave me his chainsaw, an old 15 lb homelite that must be over 40 years old by now. Good saw, but trying to guess at which chains to use and the lack of any features (auto-oiler, chain brake, vibration reduction, ect) made it an easy choice for retirement.

    If I were to guess, I'd say he was cutting across his body and the saw kicked back and hit him in the neck. Maybe his legs got twisted up and he fell, something that could have happened to me a couple dozen times. Maybe on the shoulder?

    I'm going to be even more carefull.
  17. colebrookman

    colebrookman Minister of Fire

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    Thanks mods.
    My take away point is to just slow down and listen to my inner voice when it tells me I'm cutting corners. Over 40,000 people are injured in chainsaw accidents yearly. It's not until you read about a real person and how easily it could have been me. The time when my inner voice said that I should be wearing chaps or when I put my foot on the log to steady the cut knowing that it was dangerous. But I was in a hurry, it was faster, easier and it won't happen to me. I was lucky! Reading about this young man forces me to reexamine my work habits. To always wear PPE, take precautions, not to be afraid but to have a healthy respect for chainsaws. There are thousands of ways to get hurt using chainsaws and unfortunately we get a grim reminder when something like this happens. Be safe.
    Ed
  18. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    I’m just curious as to why a smaller saw has more of a chance of a kickback. Is it because it’s lighter or that the tip of the blade is more likely to get pinched?

    Everything we do in life has a certain amount of risk to it. The carefully minded will spend the time to look over a situation, identify safety concerns/risk, calculate there worst case outcomes and implement some kind of control measure to reduce the risk factor.

    I believe I said a smaller saw has a more chance of a catastrophic consequence for its operator and that is because the shorter bar will more likely come back back and make skin contact than a longer bar. I've have kickbacks in all sized bars but the longer bars are farther always from you so they are more inclined to avoid you.

    As far as shorter bars having more kickbacks than longer bars...i dunno for sure. Our concern should be the kickbacks that can reach back and make contact. So considering that imo longer is better as far as my personal experience goes.
  19. colebrookman

    colebrookman Minister of Fire

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  20. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the kickback info. Every time someone posts about the glories of full chisel chain, I ask if there are extra safety concerns with it. This is the first time I have gotten realistic answers. I have over 30 years of accident free chain saw experience, and wonder if that would still be the case if it were not for safety chain.

    What is up with the spammers?
  21. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    this guy took in the chest there's more to it other than what chain he was using. My best guess is working on limbs over his head,chest wound is very rare.
  22. AlexNY

    AlexNY New Member

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    Unfortunately, the video is useless, the usual melodramatic drivel that passes for news these days.

    There were no details of what happend, pictures of the site, or even a general description of the setup (such as if he was on the ground or suspended). The news did say that the accident involved a kickback and chest injury.

    Trying to sell copy with pictures of kids left behind, etc. Not much else.
  23. creeker

    creeker New Member

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    I'm letting you know that the old Stihl 041 farmboss I just bought about month ago as a first chainsaw is going up for sale again. No chain brake, too heavy, and I think I need to slow down. My neighbor and I have been sharing his chainsaw for quite a while, which is a good bit lighter, with chain brake, well made (Stihl) and has served us both well. I'll look around. If I can't afford the safety equipment, it's not worth owning the saw. Thanks for the reality check.
  24. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, this has me wondering about my 30 year old Jonsered. Still cuts well but...
  25. btuser

    btuser Minister of Fire

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    I'm still thinking it was the neck. Cutting above his head and across. He got to the phone, so I don't think it was the throat or diaphram, and the rib cage is a pretty good protector. OK DONE THINKING ABOUTr THAT!!
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