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chainsaw question

Post in 'The Gear' started by ozarkjeep, Dec 7, 2006.

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  1. ozarkjeep

    ozarkjeep New Member

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    Oh ok, The cheaper saws ive used had that, The word "inertial" thru me off.

    im calling to ask, right now.

    It has the inertial brake.

    the guy repairs small engines.

    it was dropped off for repair, cylinder and piston was hashed, so he installed a 026 piston and cylinder onto it.

    needs chain sharpened he was doing that this afternoon.

    comes with 3 other chains that are sharp and ready to use.

    so... worth $150 or not?

    opinons?

    I had concerns of the larger bore needing the carb re-jetted, he says there was enough adjustement in the jet screws to get it properly tuned.

    Ill go look today.




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  2. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I'd be concerned about the condition of the crankshaft and bearing after a seize-up, especially if it's rigged up with a larger-bore piston and cylinder.
  3. ozarkjeep

    ozarkjeep New Member

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    yes, I have those concerns too, ive re-used LOTS of 2 stroke cranks with fresh bores and pistons, but generally check the rod for true and play, and replace the piston pin and bearing, and of course, no heat discoloration of the piston rod.

    crap shoot I guess.
  4. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    Why not go buy a new Stihl MS170 saw for like $180 bucks?

    I see it advertised every week.
  5. ozarkjeep

    ozarkjeep New Member

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    the only links im seeing for the ms170 are $299?

    its a smaller engine, 14" bar too?
    above folks were saying that the 024av was barely enough saw for some firewood duty.

    anyway..

    I came home with it.

    it starts and runs perfectly, came with 3 extra chains, the one on it wasnt too sharp, so the seller kept it to sharpen at work monday and bringback to me.

    He works for a Stihl repair/dealership place.

    he gave me tips on usage, how to adjust tune and the nuances about the saw ( sounds funny saying nuances about a chainsaw)

    clutch works good, sprocket looks good, bar is in good shape, inertia switch works.

    started cold on the 4rth pull. idled for ever.

    then started with one pull after that.

    Ill cut with it when I have time, tomorow hopefully.

    and report back.





  6. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Sandor is correct to say that one can buy a ms 170 for around $170. and are reported to be a good chainsaw.

    But, for firewood cutting this saw is not in the best of line up being only a very small 30 cc engine.
    This would be best used for a home yard cleanup / branches / limbing chainsaw.
  7. ourhouse

    ourhouse Minister of Fire

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    Good one BOBO
  8. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

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    Congratulations on your saw purchase! As long as it runs good, you should be happy with it. With experience and practice, you can cut firewood with just about any saw. Keep the chain sharp and enjoy!
  9. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    Enjoy your new saw - it sounds good so far.
  10. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Stihl is a good saw. Go cut some wood!
  11. ozarkjeep

    ozarkjeep New Member

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    cut up about half a rick today, from some dead trees cut in the front yard last year.

    10-14" in diameter. some kind of hard wood, REALLY dense.

    cuts easily, by the most powerful, comfortable and easy starting saw ive ever used.

    granted, ive only used cheapees before.

    But so far I am happy with it.

    Thanks everyone for the advice, tips and guidance!
  12. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

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    Sounds Good!
  13. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    If you're that impressed with 20+-year-old technology, you'll really dig using a new Husqvarna, Jonsereds or Stihl saw.
  14. ozarkjeep

    ozarkjeep New Member

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    IM sure.

    sell me one for $150 and Ill try it!




  15. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Theres the proof right there , ya get what ya pay for .............. Spend a little more money and ya buy one of the top brand chainsaws and 20+ years later it can be rebuilt and sold and still going.

    I got a whole 11 pick up loads of wood out of my 2002 Poulan Pro 54cc chainsaw before it went to the dumps and now its not worth rebuilding . O' well , its only money right , just $280. down the drain ..........looking back and thinking if i would of just added $100. to the cost of the saw i could of had a 54cc saw for 20+ years vs only 11 pick up loads of wood.

    Now you tell me what chainsaw cost the most ?

    My dead poulan pro for $280. and only 11 cords of wood cut,
    or
    The top name brand saws for $380.+ that will last for around 20 years ?

    BTW OJ , enjoy the saw brotherman , glad to see you went with a top branded saw.
  16. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    This is good advice.

    My first chainsaw, a Poulan, lasted about 10 hours before scorching a piston. Loose carb from the factory.

    Just backing up Spikes comment here. Been there, done that, learned an expensive lesson.
  17. ourhouse

    ourhouse Minister of Fire

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    Well put!!! That is why you buy quality tools
  18. ozarkjeep

    ozarkjeep New Member

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    cut some more today, nicked the gravel, and of course it doesnt cut so well now!

    haha

    now its time to learn about chain sharpening.

    and premixing fuel.
    I guess stihl oil at slightly richer than 50:1

    ive been reading the debate of bar oil VS veggie oil on arborist website too.
    tried some veggie oil today, it sure pumps alot more of that, that bar oil is THICK when its 20 degrees outside.

    I also found out from some reasearch last night, that I beleive the saw to be a 024 super.

    the 024 super, and 026 have the same stroke, and therefore interchangable cylinder/piston.

    the 024 has shorter stroke and from what I understand will not accept the 026 cylinder.

    The guy showed me on the saw where he trimmed underneath the top cover to clear the cooling fins of the 026 cylinder.

    but the plate just says 024 woods boss.

    But I guess it could have been interchanged?

    who knows, sort of cool, a whole lot of parts swappability and availablity around this whole family of saws.
    I really like that!

    So...

    who wants to advise me on sharpening? do I need to start another thread?
    Ill do some searching too.

    thanks again to everyone for the help!
  19. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

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    Ozark,

    Saw your comment about the thick oil..not sure where you are located...Up here there are both summer and winter bar oil...I would not make a big fuss over it but if I was going to run more than a couple tanks a day, would think about having the right season in it..
  20. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

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    Me too! Me too! Just once I'd like to be wealthy enough to buy something that wasn't already 20 years old. Until then.............
  21. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Ozark,

    To start, you will need some round files that match your chain and a flat raker file. You should also get a raker gauge for your particular chain. That's probably ten bucks worth of tools.

    The key to chain sharpening is to do it frequently. Most pros sharpen after every tank of gas. You want to be touching up a sharp chain all day long, rather than attempting to sharpen a dull one once. That's too much work and the results won't be nearly as good.

    Hand sharpening is the best way to sharpen a chain, but it takes a fair amount of practice to get consistently good results. But if your future includes cutting wood, the steep learning curve is well worth the effort.

    Right off the bat, you want to maintain the proper cutter angle (30 or 35 degrees, depending on the chain) and the same on all the cutters. I think the best way to do that is to start with a new chain and then try to maintain the original angle every time you file it. When it gets out of whack (which it eventually will), then you can use a gauge or some other method of restoring the proper angle.

    Try not to hit rocks or other major obstacles. As you probably know, it doesn't take much to throw a chain really far out of whack, and then it's a lot tougher to restore it.

    It's not essential that you keep all the cutters the same length, but it is important to be sure that each individual raker (depth gauge) is filed to the proper height for the cutter it serves. That's what the aforementioned raker gauge is for. When you buy one from the dealer, have him show you how to use it. It ain't hard, but it's important to get it right.

    The only other thing I would stress to get you started is that as you push the file through the cutter, you want a slight amount of upward pressure on the file so that the actual cutting edge is dressed up when you file. Don't push the file down; push it into the cutter body and slightly up. I've seen people push down as they file and what they wind up doing is removing a lot of steel from the foundation of the cutter, but not from the actual cutting edge. So they think they're sharpening the saw, but all they're really doing is making a bigger gullet, weakening the chain and ignoring the business end of the cutter.

    That ought to get you started. Check back here when you have questions--there's some guys on this forum who really know what they're talking about when it comes to chain shapening, and I'm sure they can add some tips and suggestions that will keep you on the right track.

    Here's an old thread with a tip for getting your angles consistent from side to side. The hardware will set you back another five bucks.

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/1264/
  22. ozarkjeep

    ozarkjeep New Member

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    Thanks Eric.

    IM finding the size file I need is 3/16" for the 0.325 .063 chains I have, the seller told me they were "pro chains" they are stihl chains, and have a kickback warning on the box, Ill have to look at some photos and see if they differ.

    they do cut well, and i experienced no kickback problems.

    Ive watched my grandfather file his saw chain, he would do it after every cut, but he also would cut down a tree the size of a volkswagon with a 14" electric saw.

    but, ive watched his technique, and tried it a few times. I think I can get the hang of it.

    I need to research the difference in these 0.063 chains, and a 0.050 chain. does it make in difference in the way it loads the saw? I understand that is the size of the train rail in the bar.

    I also plan to convert the spur sprocket to a drum/rim when its time for a sprocket again.

    Now, all of this research on learning about chainsaws has been fun, but now its time to find some wood and put it to use.

    Thanks again everyone!





  23. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I've been using 50-gauge, 325 pitch chain on my Husqvarna 346xp and it seems to cut a lot faster than the chain (I think it's 72 gauge, 325 pitch) I use on my older Husky model 55. The chain you're using should be plenty good.
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