Check for leaks?

ylomnstr Posted By ylomnstr, Sep 9, 2008 at 5:23 PM

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  1. ylomnstr

    ylomnstr
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    May 28, 2008
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    Since I did the install of my pellet stove myself, I'm a bit concerned about CO2 and smoke leaks from the joins in my pipes. Is there anyway to check this other than visually?
     
  2. imacman

    imacman
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    No, you won't....CO has no odor. Get a CO detector
     
  3. ylomnstr

    ylomnstr
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    May 28, 2008
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    CO2 detectors are on order from amazon. But for the smoke, there should be no smoke coming from any of the joints at all even on start up right? If there are, what are my options to stop them it from leaking?
     
  4. imacman

    imacman
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    Correct....no smoke from any joints. I don't know what type of pipe you have, but Hi Temp silicone sealant can be your friend. Available in different colors at stove shops, Home Dep., lowes, etc. Most places carry black &/or red. Coat joint ends, slide together, let cure for 12-24 Hrs.
     
  5. Czech

    Czech
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    Might want to get a CO detector instead.....

    Other than that, if you can shine a decent light into the vent in a darkened room, you'll be able to see where light leaks, thus exhaust leaks. As mentioned, high temp silicone, the high temp stuff is usually red.
     
  6. ylomnstr

    ylomnstr
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    I used the red high temp stuff already where the joints come together. If I still get a leak, can I just put more silicone on the outside of the joint and then use that high temp metal tape and spray paint it all when done?
     
  7. cac4

    cac4
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    Jul 11, 2008
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    yeah, CO2 is only a problem if you're an astronaut.

    **CO**, on the other hand....
     
  8. hossthehermit

    hossthehermit
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    When I did the first test burn on my revolution, I borrowed one of the multi-gas testers we have at work, measures CO and some other hazardous gasses. Also installed a CO monitor prior to startup. CO is what you need to worry about, not CO2. And no, you CAN NOT smell CO, trust me on this, or do your own research.
    CO detectors are cheap, $20 bucks or so at Lowe's, probably find one cheaper online. Kidde makes one of cheapest AND best rated on the market, looks like a smoke detector. IT'S NOT!!!!!! You need both. This is what I do for a living in a paper mill, I'm not promoting any brand, but I've seen the results of CO (carbon monoxide) poisoning too frequently. MY $0.02
     
  9. DiggerJim

    DiggerJim
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    Some of them are both. My Kidde's are hardwired (with battery backup) and do both CO and smoke detection. You can get one unit that does both - in the old days that wasn't the case.

    Here's a battery version: http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=143036-65213-21006674&lpage=none

    AC/Battery version: http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=62843-65213-KN-COSM-IB&lpage=none
     
  10. hossthehermit

    hossthehermit
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    May 17, 2008
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    You are correct, they do make a combo unit, works well. My point is, most people already have smoke detectors, and frequently won't buy the combo when they already have something that will do half the job. So the go without the CO monitor. BIG MISTAKE!
    Oh yeah, don't forget, change your batteries, and CO monitors typically have roughly a 7 year life span on the sensor, then it's time for a new one.
     
  11. Czech

    Czech
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    Another piece of advice, if you buy a Kidde, keep your receipt. They are covered for years on warranty (5 years?), they replaced both of mine no charge at the 4 year mark due to faults. Very cool customer service. 3 CO's in the house here, all Kidde, all good, in addition to hardwired smokes. Speaking of smokes, gotta run!
     
  12. Czech

    Czech
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    Oh, and yes, you cannot smell pure CO and it doesn't take much to wreck your day. You CAN smell typical pellet stove exhaust which contains CO. Get a detector, must have and should have in every house. Don't put it too close to the stove, you don't want it going off every time you open the stove. There's been a ton of discussion about placing it high or low on a wall due to the molecular weight of the gas, split the difference and put it up a few feet up from the ground. Get a fire ex too, this also does not go by the stove but by a doorway to the room the stove is in. All this typed regardless of the pellet stove, both should be in any house with combustion heaters (i.e. open flame, NG, LP, etc) imho.
     
  13. imacman

    imacman
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    Fire ex???????? Not sure what that is.
     
  14. n3pro

    n3pro
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    Reading the post question brought up another question. All my smoke alarms are the wired in type and are original (1995) - except batteries of course but with the other post about 5-7 year life span (somehow I didn't know) would it be a good idea to replace all mine (bedrooms, foyer, top of steps) with the combo or is that overkill; just the hallways and replace the bedrooms with smoke only?
     
  15. drizler

    drizler
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    Me's bettin he means a fire extinguisher, boy what a genius I am. Everybody should have a couple working fire extinguishers around the house whether or not they have a wood burning appliance. I have one of those old Kidde CO digital detectors. Man its old, say 1988. That thing still works. Every year I test it using the snowmobile in the garage. Keeps on tickin.
     
  16. DiggerJim

    DiggerJim
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    Smoke alarms are good as long as they test okay. CO detectors use a different technology (usually electrochemical) to sense CO and that has a lifespan. Some have removable sensors which you replace every couple of years (check the manual). Others (like the Kiddes) have you replace the whole unit on a less frequent basis - the Kidde is replaced every 7 years.
     
  17. seige101

    seige101
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    Mar 25, 2008
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    Actually smoke alarms should be replaced every 10 years.

    Why does the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) recommend that home smoke alarms be replaced after 10 years?

    Like all devices with electronic components, smoke alarms have a limited effective service life. As electronic devices, smoke alarms are subject to random failures. In 10 years there is roughly a 30% probability of failure before replacement. After 15 years, the chances are better than 50/50 that your alarm has failed. That is too big a risk to take. Replacing alarms after 10 years protects against the accumulated chance of failure, but monthly testing is still your first, best means of making sure your alarm will work.
     
  18. ylomnstr

    ylomnstr
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    May 28, 2008
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    So when I fired up the stove last night, I saw smoke leaking out from the bottom of the T, almost as if the stock seal isn't right. I'll have to seal that too now and try again.
     
  19. woodsman23

    woodsman23
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    I would have the CO monitor but to ensure a tight seal on all joints simply use some good quality steel tape. Its the sliver stuff simply silicone the joints and attach then cover all joints with this tape it will virtually eliminate any leak possibilty. I put it on my exhaust and have never had a problem.
     
  20. ylomnstr

    ylomnstr
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    May 28, 2008
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  21. imacman

    imacman
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    Did you get that in the plumbing dept. or the insulation dept? The specs look like it's for taping insulation, not heat pipe (200 degree temp limit).

    The stuff that I think Woodsman is talking about is the tape that's used to seal pipe joints, like on an oil burner exhaust pipe.

    I think you need something that will handle more than 200 degrees.
     
  22. woodsman23

    woodsman23
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    It is indeed 200 degree tape no problems at all still looks new.
     
  23. ylomnstr

    ylomnstr
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    May 28, 2008
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    I got that tape at home depot in the same isle as their pellet piping and stuff. I think it will be fine. If not, I'll take it off and get something else.
     
  24. firewarrior820

    firewarrior820
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    Aug 26, 2008
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    please post any instructions that say to use tape of any kind on PL pipe i like to see it , thanks
     
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