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chimney question

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by esox, Nov 11, 2012.

  1. esox

    esox Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2011
    Messages:
    38
    Loc:
    NE PA
    Been using my grandpa now for a year. Awesome stove, lots of creosote. I know my problem is slow burning but thats what I need to do due to our work schedules.I have no problem with cleaning the chimney and thats what I do on a regular basis. I'm venting into a designated 7in masonry chimney from the basement in a ranch home. Would I benefit from installing a liner? I realize my problem is low temp but a liner I'm assumimg would have to be 6in so I'm reducing the exhaust from the stove by 2in. Any thoughts? Thanks, Dave

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  2. Monosperma

    Monosperma Member

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    Jun 4, 2011
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    109
    Loc:
    Colorado/NewMexico
    First of all, your habit of regular cleaning is to be commended. But if you did go with a liner, if you were to insulate that liner, say by filling the space between the liner and the masonry with pumice, you would keep your gasses a little hotter and might get less creosote. Also a round liner might be a tad easier to keep clean. But a smoldering smoke dragon is a smoldering smoke dragon, no matter what flue you have, and you'll still have to clean just as regularly. (You may get less product when you clean.) JMHO.
  3. OhioBurner©

    OhioBurner© Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
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    Loc:
    Central Ohio
    Yeah, like Mono, I agree you'll still need regular cleaning. You might be able to reduce your creosote by a percentage, but overall I think your cleaning routine would be about the same.

    Also, is the 7" an inside measurement? I know when I lined my 8x12 clay lined flue the biggest stainless flex liner I could fit in there was 5.5" uninsulated. I dont think going with a smaller flue is really a good idea anyway unless specifically permitted by manufacturers manual, or your trying to do something about having too much draft.
  4. esox

    esox Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2011
    Messages:
    38
    Loc:
    NE PA
    Thanks for the replies. You guys pretty much confirmed what I was thinking. It is what it is and I'll deal with it. When the outside temps drop I'm able to burn it harder which helps a bit but then I'm loosing my burn time. The real answer is to bite the bullet I suppose and invest in a new stove. This blaze king stove seems to be the ticket from what I see from people posting as far as burn time goes and thats what I'm after. Seems hard to believe but with that many guys praising them its gotten my attention. I'm sure it would be a bit of an experiment for me to learn how to operate a modern stove as I've only ever used the old style my entire life but I'm sure I could get the hang of it without a problem. The 7in masonry flue I'm using now is an inside measurement so here's another question. If I were to put a new stove in here with a 6in exhaust shoud I install a liner for it or would my existing flue be adequate?
  5. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    You definately want an insulated liner. Draws WAAAY better than a masonry chimney, and also it stays hot and doesn't allow the creasote to form as easily as a masonry chimney would. Plus it's just an all around safer set-up. Think about it, if your masonry liner would crack, you could have big problems. With an insulated liner, that almost totally puts that worry to bed.
  6. OhioBurner©

    OhioBurner© Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    686
    Loc:
    Central Ohio
    Scotty, I agree insulated is always better, I think the problem is space. I dont think you can fit an insulated liner down a 7" masonry can you? I suppose you could do the flex liner and backfill with that perlite or whatever it is stuff. I could probably benefit from that but it seems like a big mess to me, plus it would take a lot since mine extends another whole floor down to the basement cleanout.

    As for your other question... new stoves should indicate maximum and minimum flue sizes in the documentation. While not ideal, I'd wager to say 7" (square?) would fall into the rating of most 6" stoves. I am sure you could try it that way to see, and then debate installing a liner if you have draft problems. I was even going to try venting my 6" new stove into our 8x12 masonry just because I didnt have money at the time for a liner. But then I found some online chimney places that were literally half the cost or less than my cheapest local place, and I did the install myself. So the liner became feasible and I went ahead and did the liner. Interior chimney so insulation isnt as critical, and I also sealed the basement cleanout and the raincap to try and stop any cold air infiltration. Just cleaned it out once at the end of the burning season and even though it did have about double of our other stove, the amount wasnt anything to worry about, and the stove drafts fine. YMMV.

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