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Chimney thru metal roof

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by jeff_t, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    You own a King currently?

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  2. charly

    charly Guest

    Great idea!!!!!!!!!!!
  3. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    That was going to be my next question, if it can be tucked under the ridge cap. Looks easy enough.

    I'm not sure what the inside dimensions are of the existing chimney, but the outside is pretty small. I don't think lining is an option. And like begreen said, it's already a short one, so I'm trying to keep it a straight shot.

    Dex, I picked up a used Spectrum last week, a craigslist find. And yeah, I was almost embarrassed by our lowball offer on the place, but it was accepted immediately.
    DexterDay likes this.
  4. webby3650

    webby3650 Minister of Fire

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    This flashing is made to tuck up under the existing metal roof, regardless if you are at the ridge cap.
  5. webby3650

    webby3650 Minister of Fire

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    Well if you read my post, I said I DO seal the flashing on the bottom side. And you should care what the customer wants, as long as it's safe, then it's no sweat!

    And Ice damming and leaking rarely happens on the bottom side of the chimney flashing.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    In this case I have to go by the mfg recommendation which is to seal the sides but not the bottom. If moisture gets trapped at the bottom it is going to invite rot. Make your notches clean and tight to the roof seams so that there is a very small gap and the customer shouldn't notice it.
  7. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    So, it needs to go under the roofing that is under the ridge cap? The way it is done in the picture isn't right?
  8. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    I'm totally no expert, but...
    I think I have a similar roof on my house: it's a GrandRib3 by Fabral with the exposed fasteners. I too wish it had been a hidden fastener arrangement, but that's how the house came.
    Anyway, I was interested enough (who knows, maybe I'll do something, but I doubt it) that I looked it up. Page 38 here: http://www.fabral.com/assets/media/downloads/details-postframe.pdf .
    All it talks about is pipe penetrations, but they have a boot that goes all the way to 13", and they show install details. I can see that metal one being good, from a reinforcement point of view.
    I can see that protection, reinforcement, for penetrating pipes, chimneys, etc, would be desireable for metal roofs with sliding snow. That would be a good reason to get the stack as high as possible, I would think.
    This is just me, the homeowner with no real experience, thinking. :)
  9. webby3650

    webby3650 Minister of Fire

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    I make it tight. But you wouldn't believe what some people will notice.
    In an open attic, or cathedral ceiling install that little bit of light will get through and most customers will notice it. It's easier to just seal it.
    Some will even complain about the light that is able to get through the seams in a cathedral ceiling box!
  10. webby3650

    webby3650 Minister of Fire

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    It is designed to slip under the metal on the top side, with some careful cuts to the roofing. If its right at the ridge, then it can be done like the one in the picture.
    jeff_t likes this.
  11. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Sweet. I have the feeling that's where it will end up.

    Can I use this flashing with other pipe? I wasn't planning on using Excel. This is something that will get used a handful of times in a winter, and I don't want to spend the big bucks. That flashing is the best looking flashing system I've seen, so I'll go with the Excel pipe if I have to. I guess I'd rather spend the extra bucks and not have the roof leak.
  12. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    You should be able to use this flashing with another brand class A pipe as long as it is 8" OD.
  13. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack Minister of Fire

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    It seems to me the method of cutting a slit in the roof to slide that flashing under will leave a potential leak problem area on either side of where the flashing slides under the roof?
    Installing a extra piece of roofing above the flashing so it overlaps it and extends up under the ridge cap would eliminate that potential leak source from cutting into the roof.

    On another note, when I go in my attic I see light coming in around the flashing, but it doesn't present a problem. No more that seeing light coming in around the ridge cap. No water gets in at either place.
  14. A1Stoves.com

    A1Stoves.com Minister of Fire

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    Anyone use lead flashing/solder job?
    seems the most professional to me
  15. charly

    charly Guest

    I thought that would be first class myself, but,,, I wonder about any chemical reaction with the solder and roofing metal being used. Would there be any corrosive issues down the road.. I'll also be replacing old standing seam and right now have the rubber boot set up through the metal..I think the boot is ugly... I'd rather have an all metal roof penetration... I also picked up a nice cricket that will go on the new roof from Obadiah's..
  16. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

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    about the only place lead is allowed these days is in a masonry chimney into a shingled roof... and I expect that to go away soon too...
  17. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

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    in a whole bunch of ways a silicone boot is vastly superior to an all metal penetration into a roof, especially when it comes to allowing thermal movement and acting as a thermal break....
  18. webby3650

    webby3650 Minister of Fire

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    Or, if that is what you are used to using. Just because you install one and walk away, and never hear from the customer again doesn't mean that they don't have issues.
    It is not superior, I see leaks with them all the time.
  19. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    The most important job of the flashing is a safe, weather-tite seal. There's no problem with thermal movement with a conventional flashing either. Is there a big need for a thermal break in this case? What is the advantage here?
  20. charly

    charly Guest

    Mine actually developed a leak, it was on a raise rib metal panel..The fix,,, I unscrewed the bottom of the boot and filled the roof holes underneath with silicone,, it never leaked again,,,even though the directions said to screw the bottom as well...I wasn't going to at first but did follow the directions,,, should have stuck to my guns...To me the silicone boot looks like an eye sore on a nice new roof,, just looks out of place to me,, like a patch job. Takes away from the clean lines of the roof, like someone threw a shovel full of silicone on the roof:).
  21. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

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    I have installed several hundred of them... any leaks I have seen have been to because the trades (typically plumbers) push the pipe up, then pull it back down to set it back into the fitting inverting the boot... using a boot on a seamed class A chimney requires a bead of silicone around the lip, particularly where the seam is.
  22. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

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    there is if you're trying to meet an overly stringent energy code... whether it actually amounts to anything or not is a whole different question...
  23. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

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    if you've got a standing seam roof, and you're ok with your chimney being jacked back and forth a 1/2" by the roof, by all means, go for it.
  24. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    If that is the concern, wouldn't the screwing down of the flashing, be it silicone or metal, be a concern? I would expect either to limit expansion.
  25. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

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    silicone will allow roof skin movement much better than the traditional metal flashing and storm collar, assuming it is appropriately sized.. i.e don't use a boot that is pretty much maxed out. With a silicone boot, you can use stitch screws and attach it only to the roof panel; which allows things to remain somewhat independent. traditional metal flashings fix the roof and chimney to each other... and this causes the chimney to get rocked back and forth through the whole temp cycle... which in my local is pretty much a 115F swing. I don't particularly like using silicone boots, but in that application, it *is* what works best...

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