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Classic 1980 Gold Marc Fireplace Insert

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by hardwood715, Jan 7, 2012.

  1. hardwood715

    hardwood715 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Messages:
    410
    Loc:
    Hyde Park, New York
    My 1980 Gold Marc Fireplace Insert, I have been heating with this stove for years, and a classic she is

    Attached Files:

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  2. hardwood715

    hardwood715 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Messages:
    410
    Loc:
    Hyde Park, New York
    Another shot of her

    Attached Files:

  3. hardwood715

    hardwood715 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Messages:
    410
    Loc:
    Hyde Park, New York
    And opened as a small fireplace with the screen attached

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  4. hardwood715

    hardwood715 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Messages:
    410
    Loc:
    Hyde Park, New York
    The Gold Marc line of stoves were manufactured by Gold Marc Industries in Monticello NY. There were a few models including the Plainsman, Prospector, and the Fire Place Insert. The Plainsman was a free standing rendition of the classic Fireplace Insert with the exception of a round flue compared to the damperslide incorporated in the Fireplace Insert.The Plainsman has the 2 knobs per door as the Insert. The prospector picks up the style of the Fisher Step stove with 3 knobs per door for air adjustment. My classic fireplace insert features a 3/4 inch steel baffle, with a 3.4 cubic feet firebox which can easily accommodate a 22 inch width split and a 17 inch deep split and it is a beast when she is loaded and rearing to go. A beautiful stove from the Gold Marc team, which ceased the stove manufacturing part of their steel plant in the mid 80s.
  5. TradEddie

    TradEddie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    745
    Loc:
    SE PA
    After lurking for years on these forums, your pictures made me finally register and post. We have really enjoyed our Gold Marc insert since buying our house in 2003. With the blower on low speed, and a half load of oak, our kitchen can reach 90F when its 20F outside. Running the central air fan helps distribute some of the heat through the 1900sqft Cape, but when the kitchen is so toasty, 70F in a bedroom can feel cold! We frequently lose power in winter storms, I simply unbolt the blower and place a muffin fan by the opening (in a short metal pipe to protect the fan). One 9v PP3 battery can last many hours. I have cleaned and rebuilt the blower and motor once, but otherwise this stove has served us flawlessly for eight years, and presumably served the previous owners equally well for at least twenty years before that. We live on a mature wooded lot so firewood is free. I shudder to think what our heating bill would be without this stove.

    Unfortunately I think it's time for a new stove. The top baffle has a cracked weld and is beginning to warp and rust. I'm nervous about giving up this insert, between the aggravation of the changes needed to bring things up to code and the fear that a new one will simply not heat so well (especially when power is lost), I'm slow to step into a showroom.

    TE

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  6. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,379
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    I sold those models!
    Heck of a stove! Really nice metal forming too!

    They had a nice freestander later on called the Prospector.
  7. VCBurner

    VCBurner Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,509
    Loc:
    Templeton, MA
    A friend had one of the Gold Marc combination stoves in his basement. It was a furnace type style. I researched those for a while to see if I could help him sell it. Found some pics of the same model being sold on line as well. I wish I could find the pics now I'd share them with you. While researching I found out that model was commonly used in garages and large bus ports in Monticello. They must have thrown out some heat! My friend's house was a huge 200 year old farm house and that beast heated the house from the basement. before he moved in an inspector made him disconnect it from the furnace flue! It has been sitting there unused since, as it is too big to move out of the cellar without extreme effort.

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