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Clearances from top of Fisher Stove to a mantle

Post in 'Fisher Stove Information, Parts, History and More' started by afptl, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. afptl

    afptl Member

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    Northern KY
    Still working on trying to figure out about the wood stove. I do have a copy of a Fisher manual, but in the clearance section it does not reference the clearances from the top of the stove to a fireplace mantel. We would mount this more on the hearth than in the fireplace area. Above the stove is a cedar wood mantel. trying to get some idea if it would need a shield or the safe distances. any ideas? thanks ann

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  2. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Not sure if you are referring to an Insert;
    Page 7 shows minimum distance from Insert top to combustible mantle. (33") It also shows from Insert top to combustible trim under mantle. (26")
    Note: The Fireplace enclosure kit includes a deflector above the Insert on about a 45* angle. This is very important and required to baffle the heat out away from the hearth.
  3. afptl

    afptl Member

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    I was going to put a stove on the hearth instead of the insert. I found a stove on craigslist, but I think it is a baby bear. which according to the sales brochure here on hearth.com, means it was rated for 1000 sq feet. I think it might be too small. House is 1300 sq feet ranch.

    there is a mantel above the fireplace. Not real big, but I wanted to be careful about all the clearances. thanks for the info. I think I will kinda follow the 33 inch rule unless I can figure out a deflector idea. (probably can) Need to go measure some measurements now! thanks!
  4. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Clearance to the back and sides of the stove you mention are 36 inches. Clearance to the top, would be the ceiling. You can't park your wood stove under the combustible mantle. Not even kinda. If you install a stove in front of the fireplace, seal the fireplace front off with a plate, do away with the mantle. If you want a stove under the mantle, it needs to be an Insert with the approved deflector.
  5. CamFan

    CamFan Member

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    North East Georgia
    very correct!!! If you want an insert buy one. If you can not afford it wait. It is for your safety and the families.

    Now, like Coaly said if you remove the mantle and have the proper floor protection with all the clearances to the side etc you should be ok. He suggested a face seal which will work but you can also do a throat seal and the best method would be a positive connection or a relining with direct connection to the stove. You want all the air going up the chimney going through the stove.
  6. afptl

    afptl Member

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    the reason I asked is the stove we have now, a Vermont Castings Intrepid II, in the manual has a clearance of 30 inches from the top of the stove to a mantle. the mantle can not be more than 9 inches deep. We basically have a cedar board, about 2 inches thick and 6 inches wide as our "mantel." Right now, I am meeting the clearance requirements fine for the stove. Just the stove is too small and cold isn't working for me! I was thinking if VC had a clearance, than maybe other stove companies do too.

    We are still just trying to look and figure things out. The problem is our budget is so tight. I am just trying to figure out a list of stoves that will work, then trying to find them on Craigslist.
  7. CamFan

    CamFan Member

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    you are on the right track and yes the stoves do have clearances and you should be able to find them easy on line. Good luck. Older stoves will be harder to find information.
  8. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Ann, The reason you can't use another stove manufacturers clearances is due to your current stove being a UL Listed stove. Underwriter Labs does the testing and comes up with the clearances on each appliance tested. The Fisher in question is NOT a UL tested stove. (to our knowledge) Therefore it must be installed as per non-listed, or pre-UL codes. That is where the 36 inches comes from. Things may very well work, but it's against the solid fuel code NFPA 211. If anything happens, you would be on your own. If you get a UL listed Fisher, the installation instructions that are also approved by UL govern the installation.
    In time you should find an Insert with a UL tag for $100 or less. Watch scrap yards as well. They set stoves aside, amazing what you'll find there.
  9. afptl

    afptl Member

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    I never thought about the scrap yards!! What a great idea! I don't mind the "sweat Equity" of even cleaning up a stove and painting it. Just trying to make it all work out.
    I'm off to call the scrapyards. There are 2 in our area--my son has sold some scrap and junked an old truck once.

    thanks for the info about the UL stuff. It was really helpful. It hadn't all "clicked" yet with me. I appreciate you taking the time to respond to my post!! :)
  10. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    I would install a deflector if that mantle is relatively close. They are easy to make (they even sell them!) and do a great job. Sometimes they can be quite small, especially if only protecting the lower part (board against the wall part) of a multi-part mantel.

    Can you post a pic of the fireplace sometime?

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