"Coasters" for stove legs to sit on

sksmass Posted By sksmass, Aug 30, 2010 at 7:24 PM

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  1. sksmass

    sksmass
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    I am doing my hearth in 12"x12" dark porcelain tiles and had a thought that I might cut a 12x12 tile in a contrasting (lighter) color into quarters and set my stove legs on top of those resulting 6" squares. They would act kind of like coasters. They would not be grouted into the hearth. I'd just set them on top of the finished tile work and then set the stove on them. The idea would be threefold:
    1) the lighter-colored "coasters" would make the black cast iron of the legs "pop" a little more rather than just blending into the dark field tile.
    2) the coasters would serve like kind of a sacrificial hearth. They'd get scratched instead of the permanent tile
    3) if I ever get a bigger stove, I could just move the coasters to match the new stoves dimensions, as they are not permanently fixed to one spot.

    But I'd need to put something soft on the back of them so that they would not scratch the permanent tile themselves. My first instinct is to hot glue some cork sheet (like bulletin board material) on them, but that is combustible right? What is thin, soft, and non-combustible that might serve as a backing for such "coasters"?
     
  2. fossil

    fossil
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    Dunno what stove you've got, but I'm wondering, once the stove is carefully landed in place, what's gonna cause anything to scratch your hearth tiles? That stove ain't going anywhere, nor are you going to be sliding it around getting it to where it needs to be. For even the slightest movement, it'll have to be lifted and repositioned. Trying to slide or "bump" it into place will risk damage to the legs. You can use heavy cardboard pieces under the feet to facilitate positioning, but you still want to pick up most of the weight before moving the stove around, then remove the pieces one at a time when you're happy with where the stove is...but once it's down on the hearth you're not going to be scooting it around scratching your tile. Rather than complementing the look of the hearth, I'd think that exposed unfinished edges of cut tiles would detract from it, personally. Those are my thoughts. Rick
     
  3. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
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    I agree with Fossil . . . most stoves once in place are not going to move a whole lot . . . I wouldn't worry too much about scratches . . . my stove is on slate which is known to scratch easily and I have had zero issues with movement and scratches from the stove.

    And I concur . . . I think the "coasters" would make the hearth look unfinished . . . and just be another area for dirt, ash and sawdust to accumulate.
     
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart
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    If you ever need to move the stove, put four "furniture sliders" under the legs and you can glide it around on the hearth to your hearts content without scratching anything. Probably cost ya five or six bucks. I lucked out and bought two sets at a dollar store for a buck a set. Love those things. In fact I just came back in from putting a set under my generator so I can slide it out of the shack and fuel it when the hurricane blows the house down later this week. Or move the generator out and sleep in the shack.
     
  5. fossil

    fossil
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    Funny, I have an old friend named Earl who's expected to visit us just about the same time...only I'm looking forward to seeing him, as he's coming up from California to buy my wife's car from us. I hope your Earl turns out to be a wimpy dude. OK...sorry for the sidetrack...back to the thread now. Rick
     
  6. Danno77

    Danno77
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    hi temp silicone of some sort could work. I would think that there is some automotive gasket that could be cut and would work.

    although....
    I agree with others that it's likely to be a place for dirt and ash to collect.
     
  7. DiscoInferno

    DiscoInferno
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    I tried the same thing, put small tile squares under each foot of the Napoleon, with smaller squares of sheet metal (brass flashing I think) under that to prevent scratching. They all cracked after a few fires because they were only supported in a few spots (semi-hollow backs to the tiles) and the feet shifted around a little from expansion and contraction. Also the feet don't sit very flush, but pretty much on a corner, which also made me want to have some sacrificial tile under there just in case there's a void under the real tile under the foot. My next attempt may be to butter the backs with thinset, then apply the sheet metal. Or just give up like everyone else suggests. They do collect some dirt and ash, although they sweep/vacuum up easily enough.
     
  8. soupy1957

    soupy1957
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    When we bought our Antique Kitchen Cook Stove (Cast Iron Wood burning) I remember the guy telling us, "go over to that shelf there, and pick yourselves out 4 of any kind of those coasters you see there." So the wife picked out four that she liked.

    The thought of putting it on Coasters hadn't occurred to me. I figured that it would sit directly on the floor!

    If this is about the potential of a fire hazard, I don't get it...............why not locate it on a hearth pad?

    If this is about the heat potential, ..........don't think it'll start a fire from making the floor hot (at least not without a spark). The floor would have to get to at LEAST 450ºF before it would spontaneously combust, and I'd think that the legs wouldn't get as hot as the firebox?

    -Soupy1957
     
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