1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Cob corn? In a standard wood furnace

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by MT12157, Dec 1, 2012.

  1. MT12157

    MT12157 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2012
    Messages:
    17
    Loc:
    Schoharie NY
    Been lurking for a while and decided I would join in here.

    Anyways, I am wondering if well dried cob corn can be burnt in a stove/furnace? Seems like it would do ok but have never heard much about it. Any thoughts..

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. wrightk20

    wrightk20 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    I knew someone that had a whole corn crib full that was starting to mold so he used it to heat his house instead. I guess it worked good but it was very dusty to work with. He ended up not using it all.
  3. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Messages:
    1,812
    Loc:
    Ashland OH
    I tried it in our old woodfurnace. Didn't have much luck, and it requires more air to burn. I know exhaust from corn is very corrosive, so take that into play. We had a old clay liner so I didnt worry about it.
    Augie likes this.
  4. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    Make sure your flue is multi fuel rated. Corn is Very Corrosive.
  5. MT12157

    MT12157 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2012
    Messages:
    17
    Loc:
    Schoharie NY
    Thank you, I have a clay lined chimney at this point. I am just planning for next fall when I hope to get a wood furnace or something that burns for free or nearly free. The house I am moving into has oil ( new furnace going in next week) and I am getting spooked by the prices. My situtation may change and not have the time to cut wood but i do have corn equipment which got me thinking.


    -Mike
  6. flyingcow

    flyingcow Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Messages:
    2,297
    Loc:
    northern-half of maine
    My business is hauling milk for dairy farmers. The price of corn is out of site. The ones that grow it are even having a hard time to justify it. how does corn compare to cord wood? Pellets? ........look at coal too!
  7. MT12157

    MT12157 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2012
    Messages:
    17
    Loc:
    Schoharie NY
    That is true. Wood is free to me minus my time, pellets are an option at 210ish a ton right now but have no idea how many tons I would use in a season, Oats and would work cheap as I can grow and harvest corn would be not too bad since I can grow and harvest in cob form only at this time, coal locally is 330/ton which seems awful high? The records I found on the house show anywhere form 900-1500 gal of oil a year which is scary granted the duct work was bad which would make even a high efficiency furnace operate at 50% if lucky. Getting that all replaced now but don't see us using less than 700 gallon which at $3.78 is a still more almost triple what I am paying in my current home with NG.
  8. flyingcow

    flyingcow Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Messages:
    2,297
    Loc:
    northern-half of maine
    330 for coal don't seem bad for the btu's you get out of it. pay attention to btu's per ton of whatever you what to burn. plus moisture content.
  9. Mr A

    Mr A Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2011
    Messages:
    597
    Loc:
    N. California
    I had the same thought about using pellets in the wood burner. I don't know how pellet or corn stoves work, but the info I read says it generally doesn't work due to airflow. There is a special basket sold http://www.thepelleteer.com/ that can be used for pellets in a wood stove or insert. I would try to make one out of plaster lathe before I bought one. I'm not sure, but do corn kernels burn similar to pellets, as far as the need for airflow? There are stoves that are made just to burn corn or pellets, They need electricity to operate. Burning pellets seems expensive to me. the Pelleteer states a 6 hour burn time for 17 pounds of pellets in the 18 inch model. On a cold day you would need 60 pounds of pellets to burn 24 hours. A 40 pound bag is around $5 bucks?. I dont know, but I would think a farmed product(corn) would cost more than a sawmill waste product(sawdust). Still cheaper than oil- I like my free firewood scrounged from all over town throughout the year. http://www.stretcher.com/stories/07/07dec03d.cfm#.ULrrl4M8CSo
  10. wrightk20

    wrightk20 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    First thing i would look into are ways to improve the house insulation. Next i would decide if you want to cut wood for heat because it is a big chore to css firewood from one year to the next. Wood pellets would be my second option, but buy in bulk and shop around.
  11. JP11

    JP11 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 15, 2011
    Messages:
    1,125
    Loc:
    Central Maine
    You need to compare heat OUTPUT for dollars. Coal is super dense with energy.

    Every heat source also has a factor in there for work you need to do.

    A lot of us are comfortable with the labor aspect of tending a fire.

    Pellets are less hands on work. Oil and propane are less work.. but just as painful... WRITING CHECKS! :)

    JP
    flyingcow likes this.
  12. Mr A

    Mr A Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2011
    Messages:
    597
    Loc:
    N. California
    Exactly. You still need to go out and do what you do to earn dollars to pay for the heat. I just happened to have some free time to scrounge 8 cords, and split and stack at my leisure. Also lucky that 3 of those cords were already cut and split. I have maybe 2 -3 years of firewood for not a whole lot of work, in my opinion.

Share This Page