Cover next years wood pile?

Greg123 Posted By Greg123, Aug 27, 2009 at 3:18 PM

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  1. Greg123

    Greg123
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    I have this years wood seasoned and stacked in my wood shed, working on next years now, currently I’m splitting all the wood and throwing it in a huge pile, once I start stacking it should I cover it this winter? Since it not going to be used until the 2010/2011 heating season does it still need to be covered? We get heavy amounts of snow every year not sure if that matters or not.
     
  2. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart
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    I am the only one allowed to top cover wood as soon as it is split and stacked. Everybody else in the wood burning world will tell you not to cover it. :mad:
     
  3. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler
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    I'd cover the tops only in the winder, and remove in the spring.
     
  4. Wet1

    Wet1
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    I just leave it uncovered year round... works well for me, but I'm several years ahead.
     
  5. smokinj

    smokinj
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    never have never will
     
  6. quads

    quads
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    No cover.
     
  7. PunKid8888

    PunKid8888
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    cover it, its going to be covered in snow all winter, so you might as well cover it first so when it does melt it does end up soaking up into the wood
     
  8. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood
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    As long as you have a place that is reasonably high and dry, I wouldn't cover it. We get a similar amount of snow and it doesn't seem to bother it.
     
  9. Nixon

    Nixon
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    As soon as My wood is split ,and stacked the top is covered . I don't have to bother with going back to do it later .
     
  10. Greg123

    Greg123
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    Seems like a 50/50 split on covering. Thanks for the info
     
  11. d.n.f.

    d.n.f.
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    So you are covering half?
     
  12. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
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    I don't cover the following year's wood which is in a pile and/or stack . . . and we also tend to get a decent amount of snow here.
     
  13. Greg123

    Greg123
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    LOL :lol:
     
  14. Greg123

    Greg123
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    This brings up another question, will the season process start if I just leave it in a pile all winter and stack it early spring?.
     
  15. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler
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    [/quote]

    This brings up another question, will the season process start if I just leave it in a pile all winter and stack it early spring?.[/quote]

    Might even season quicker than stacked if it loosely stacked and off the ground. (The ones on the bottom may be tough, but as long as they are split they are going to season)
     
  16. Todd

    Todd
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    There you go, cover half and take moisture readings every day and report your findings back to us to settle this once and for all. :lol:
     
  17. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
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    I move some of my seasoned wood into the shed in the Fall so that I should have about 2 years worth under the roof. Whatever doesn't make it into the shed sits out all Winter without any cover.

    Just a couple of days ago I threw some rubber roofing on one of my piles that I plan to move into the shed this Fall. I have enough rubber roofing to cover more so I just might do it.
     
  18. JotulOwner

    JotulOwner
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    I like to cover the top of my neatly and tightly stacked 4x4x8 wood piles with painted plywood because I believe that water that infiltrates the center of the pile (where the sunlight doesn't reach) will be much more difficult to evaporate if I leave it uncovered. The wind blowing through the sides carries away moisture from the seasoning wood and any rain water that soaks the splits at the outer edges.

    I tried tarps but they often break down and fail. I found that out the hard way.

    If I had the room and stacked wood in single rows, I might do it differently since there is less to consider when it comes to trapped moisture.

    There are a lot of variables to consider. Everyone has to figure out what works best in their situation.
     
  19. jebatty

    jebatty
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    I cover my outdoor stored wood with corrugated metal scrap panels from an old building. Sheds water and snow and allows air to circulate through the top of the stacks; no condensation issue. I also have left large piles of split wood outside uncovered all winter, and then stack the following spring/summer and cover with corrugated. I suspect it makes little difference. Whatever your preference, but don't cover in a way (a tarp, for example) that will limit air flow or allow condensation to drip down on the wood.
     
  20. flyingcow

    flyingcow
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    i didn't cover mine, drying good. I'm more concerned about having high/dry ground underneath. On gravel, no grass.I evened mowed the grass next to the gravel area so it would get the best chance for air flow and keep the ground dry. This is my next years wood.
     
  21. wahoowad

    wahoowad
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    I wouldn't bother covering it while you still have it in a pile. Being in a pile (hopefully) implies you will be stacking it eventually. I'd stack it this winter when it isn't so hot to do so, then cover just the top.
     
  22. JustWood

    JustWood
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    Greg
    If u live WNY where I live ,,,, better cover it!!!!!!!!!
     
  23. Ratman

    Ratman
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    If you love your wood as I do mine, top cover with overhang when it rains or snows.
    When it stops, get off your ass and uncover it.
    If unavailable, the wifeunit or one of the other hobbits I live with will assist.
     
  24. branchburner

    branchburner
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    I have a habit of stacking my wood so tightly when green that I think not much air can pass through the stack, and it seasons more slowly. I'm trying a new strategy: leave it the first year with good sun exposure in a big, loose pile, unstacked and uncovered, as Greg now has it. (Actually, several smaller piles, not a huge one.) Second year, stacked and covered. But both years off the ground, on pallets to let air flow through.

    My reasoning is that unstacked and uncovered will allow better airflow, even if exposed to some moisture. The first year is for seasoning - it doesn't need to be dry 24-7, it needs sun and air. Sun! It's been known to dry things! Covering unseasoned wood is going to keep as much moisture in the stack as it keeps out. Once it's really dry (year two), then I'll keep it dry by covering it, in the early fall before the rains.

    My Dad dug some oak out of the bottom corner of his big stack in the barn last year, on gravel and very dry in there. Said it had to be four years old, and it sizzled like it was green. Yeah, it was oak, but four years? He figured it went in the woodshed green and stayed half green 'cause it never saw any sun or wind.

    So my answer is: all of the above. Unstacked and uncovered and stacked and covered.
     
  25. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot
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    Thing is, unless on something well drained, the loose piles cover a lot more ground than when stacked and the bottom is in contact with the ground and moisture.
    I've also had the issue when trying to cover just the top, rain or snow weighs it down, and parts of top become exposed.
    Where my wood is stacked it's shady.
    I'm going to cover the wood with good amounts of overhang next time and maybe even retrofit what I have.
     
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