Covering wood

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by woodslinger, Sep 10, 2009.

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  1. woodslinger

    woodslinger
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    A wood shed is not an option right now. I currently store about 2 weeks worth of wood in my garage (no more space available). I need to cover my stacks before the first snow (still have plenty of time). Does clear plastic work best or does it matter? What is the recommended thickness?
    Thanks
     
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  2. firefighterjake

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    If your wood is pretty much seasoned I don't think clear plastic will make all that much of a difference in seasoning it any further -- better to just cover the tops and not the sides to allow air flow to continue to season the wood stack. I think it is more important in covering the stack to go with a thicker or heavier duty covering rather than clear vs. colored . . . that said, I used the regular old tarps last year (blue, brown, etc.) and had good luck . . . just minimize any flapping action to reduce the likelihood of tears.
     
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  3. GaryS

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    If you can find it, get some scrap rubber roofing. It's heavy as hell but will last and the wind won't blow it around. Other than that, I just use the plastic tarps from Waly World or Lowes.
     
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  4. ISeeDeadBTUs

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    The BEST material to cover wood with is . . . more firewood
     
  5. smokinj

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    2nd that
     
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  6. Backwoods Savage

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    We cover ours with (old) galvanized roofing.

    [​IMG]

    That particular pile has been there 5 or 6 years. We'll probably get to it next year.
     
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  7. LLigetfa

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    Wow, I can't believe that metal stays put. Around here it would go airborne and kill someone or go through a window. I've had lots of tarps shredded by the wind and had to go retrieve them from the bush.
     
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  8. Backwoods Savage

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    We do weight some of it down lest we have to head out in the woods to retrieve it. lol Usually just throw some wood on top but if you look at the picture you'll see a broken cement block there too.
     
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  9. BrotherBart

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    45 mil EPDM rubber roofing all the way. Why in the world didn't I discover that stuff 30 years ago? Of course when the six cord stack is burned it is time to call in a couple of neighbors to move that heavy stuff. I have done it twice by myself but never again. It is like trying to pick up a liquid Dodge truck.
     
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  10. woodgeek

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    I use masonite (hard-board). Cheap and flexes to conform to the stack. A split sheet 2'x8' has a nice overhang on both sides. They can get a little ratty in the rain, but they are holding up well after several seasons.
     
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  11. Nonprophet

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    When we bought our yurt used, the previous owners had insulated the floor with 4'x8' sheets of foam core board. We had about 6-8 sheets left over. They're about 3" of hard foam sandwiched between what looks like 3/16" tar paper. They're very light and thus easy to move around, and, they're waterproof too. We've been using them for 4 years now and they're holding up very well. There's a local place that sells used building materials and they have stacks of them (also available in 2", and 1" thicknesses) for $2-4 a sheet--I think they sell new for about $8 a sheet. Because they're so light, we weigh them down with stones, blocks, etc. I really like them because they're so easy to move, they're waterproof, and, well they were free!!!

    NP
     
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  12. gerry100

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    Anything that keeps rain/snow from getting into the wood from above.

    As long as you prevent water from collecting in the pile the wood won't know.

    I agree with those that recycle stuff laying around that they would just have to trash.

    I used plastic,metal and even vinyl flooring I took up out of the house before I built my shed.

    Buying anything should be the last resort.
     
  13. Highbeam

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    I buy rolls of plastic sheet from HD. You can get 2,4,or 6 mil thickness and I've used 4 and now 6. The 6 mill is much thicker. I attach mine with string. Lots of little attachment points is better than a few big ones. I use black due to the superior UV resistance. Clear will rot in the sun.
     
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  14. waynek

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    I have said it before...I use lumber tarps to cover my wood stacks. Cheap --- I get them free. Place small rubber balls on the tarp...apply a nylon cord, cinch it up with a slip knot and tie her down.
    jackpine
     
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  15. waynek

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    Recycle the stuff...but when the material is no longer of use then what? In my case I use lumber tarps and when they deteroiate I haul them over to a farmer down the valley. He makes corn silage sausages and hay marshmallows. When they are emptied they are stock piled and I put the tarps in the pile. A enviro-firm pickups them and disposes of them.
    jackpine
     
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  16. waynek

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    Geez! I like the looks of that stack. Wood is like wine...it gets better with age.
    jackpine
     
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  17. Backwoods Savage

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    Thanks jackpine. I was amazed that nobody saw the kindling stuck in the ends. That is how we store most of the kindling so we always have plenty on hand. It is handy for sure. Also, this is one of the stacks with nothing beneath the wood except Mother Earth. Of course, it is yellow sand so no harm is done. We've never had any wood rot yet from stacking this way in this spot.
     
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