cracked drywall

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by narutojp, Mar 26, 2006.

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  1. narutojp

    narutojp
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    I've experienced cracking in my drywall beside my woodstove. I've got brick going up two sides surrounding the woodstove, about 1 meter high. The cracking occurs in the middle of the wall, where the drywall seams meet. I've re-done the drywall once last fall only to have it crack again this winter. The stove is about 20 cm from the wall. Is this common for drywall around woodstoves? Should I extend the brick (the brick was put on over the drywall) up past the cracked area (ie. Is this the only solution?)? Appreciate any ideas.
     

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  2. Willhound

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    Cracks in drywall joints are usually caused as the wood framing underneath dries out and contracts, therefore moving slightly. Usually more of an issue with a relatively new construction as even kiln dried lumber still has moisture in it.

    If you have fixed it, and it re-cracks in the winter, there could have still been moisture in the lumber?? Combination of less humidity in winter, and heat from the stove is drying it out.

    The only solution I've ever seen is let it sit for a few years and then fix it once and for all.



    Willhound
     
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  3. elkimmeg

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    Drywall is considered combustible with paper face and backing I think the crack it telling you something. Damn its hot here, less than 8" away from combustibles. Canadian code is stricter than ours but even so, it should be a yard or meter away. You are lucky you are posting instead of calling the fire dept. No fiber glass tape or paper or joint compound is designed to withstand the heat, it is being exposed to. Bet that installation never was inspected. Consider my post as an attempt to save your life, then worry about your drywall
     
  4. bruce

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    is that dura bond the same you use for tile?
    that sounds like a great idea
     
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  5. narutojp

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    Yeah, it is a new house. There have been the odd crack here and there throughout the house, due to a) it is a new house, so the house is still settling (or so I've been told), b) the house is dry in the winter while we burn (yes, we use a humidifier) and c) I did the job myself (ie. not professional). That said, this corner is the worst for cracking. I did check for drywall movement when I removed the tape last time, but I could have missed something. I also used fiberglass adhesive drywall tape, so I didn't put any mud under the tape as you would with paper tape. Would paper tape be better?
    In reply to Better safe than sorry, you may be right about the heat. I will look into extending the brick facing on the walls.
     
  6. elkimmeg

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    As an inspector, a word of caution, just bcause you place a brick wall in front th that does not satisfy code. If 3' is required, the plain brick wall will only reduce the clearance requirement by 1/3. A brick wall with 1" air space 50 % reduction in any case less, than 8" is a very dangerous situation. Like I said I doubt it ever passed inspections nor was a permit ever pulled. BTW required. Read your manufactures manual for proper clearances.
     
  7. carpniels

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    Hi narutojp,

    I have to agree with ELK. Consider this an early warning. Check your manual and if you do not meet the minimum clearances, DO NOT USE THE STOVE!!! You could set your new house on fire.

    Get another stove that meets the clearances you have or change your installation.

    Carpniels

    PS. I have a certain install and wanted to change my stove to a larger model. I found only 2 stoves that meet the installation requirements. But better be safe than without a roof over your head!!!
     
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