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  1. craigvalk

    craigvalk New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2005
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    Have a relatively new installation in my home. Russo stove, piped into 6 inch ss liner, installed in a masonry chimney, inside house( not running up external wall). Been burning only about 7 weeks or so since new install. And not every night!

    I have a thermometer and try to burn at 800 or so.

    My wood is well seasoned and dry. Never have had any water cooking out of wood while I burn.

    Went up on roof today and there is a thin glaze of hard, black creosote build up, I scraped it off the cap. But is a very thin glaze of this stuff a hazard? I think I should go get a brush and do it ASAP. And next question, ok to use steel brush in that SS liner?

    I can't tell how far down the chimney the glaze is but suspect it is near the top where the chimney exits house and is cooler. I am having no draft problems and always make sure to let the stove get real hot before damping it.


    Advice appreciated.

    Craig

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  2. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Boulder County
    the less dampning you do the less the cap will be a mess. Your right about the flue gas condensating at the exposed chimney, when you choke your stove the flue temps drop signifantly and will cause more creasote. Keep it hot all the time, or be prepard to clean that cap quite a bit.

    And a steal brush is just fine for a liner, its all i would recomend.
    Ryan
  3. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

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    Also, if it's a russo stove that was made for coal and not one of the multi fuel units, then it's part of your problem. Burning wood in a older stove is a dirty job to begin with, but take into account that the stove might only have underfire air control and you'll see why you have a bit of creosote accumulation.

    Not trying to be a pain at all, I'm just saying the stove might be part of the problem.
  4. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    I had a metallurgist recently tell me that using steel brushes to clean thin (and MOST are almost paper thin) flex stainless liners will shorten their life. According to this expert, small pieces of the steel brushes can break off and then react with the stainless. Also, it is possible to eventually perforate these thin liners.....

    I recently had the chance to cut and pull apart some of the flex liners and was amazed at how thin they are - and most are not even welded, then are simply spun and pressed together. While they may have passed UL testing, one cannot say what will happen after 15-20 years of hard use and cleaning with a metal brush.....

    I vote for plastic!

    A thin layer of glaze is fairly normal - it may build up and then burn off on a regular basis. However, if it gets quite thick, a chimney fire could be hot!
  5. craigvalk

    craigvalk New Member

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    Thanks much for the advice. I do have the brush and all but from what I have read I would be better off to spend a little time treating the fires with the anti-creosote agents and then cleaning. the glaze is "very thin" and there is no clogging at all.
    Got some of the Rutland powder and spray so will try that for a couple of weeks and it sounds as though it will help loosen that stuff a little before I run the brush down it.

    Thanks

    Craig
  6. craigvalk

    craigvalk New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2005
    Messages:
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    Thank you.. it is a wood only stove, and it does not have the underfire air. it's got adjustable vents each side. Front loader, with glass door.
    I don't think the creosote is extreme after perusing other posts. Will treat it with the Rutland powder and re-inspect / run the brush down in a couple of weeks.


    Craig
  7. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    I should refrase my comment on the brush and liner issue, i only sell heavy liners, i have no experence with thin ones, if it were "paper thin" i would use nylon. But i wouldnt install a paper thin liner to begin with. I have never seen a liner that was so thin that i would prevent me to use a metal brush. But thats me, and i only sell one brand, simpson duraliner, and that stuff is bomb proof.
    Ryan
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