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Creosote Removal Products - Anyone else use them?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by MnDave, Dec 23, 2012.

  1. MnDave

    MnDave Guest

    I have used a powder product for years and it seems to help prevent buildup of creosote which makes running the brush quick and easy.

    I only use 2 tablespoons every week or so vs the every 3rd fire as recommended in the directions.

    I brush at the beginning of the season and in the middle of the season. I find that the creosote simply flakes off and falls down to the cleanout.

    I always look to see if there is any damage to the stainless steel. I cannot detect any.

    Does anyone see a problem using this stuff?

    MnDave

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  2. MnDave

    MnDave Guest

    I guess that I should not have called it a "removal product". It, "Acts as a catalyst and destroys the binder which holds the creosote particles together."

    MnDave
  3. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    I use the Anti-Creo-Soot spray which works great, the pipe looks great here too.
  4. jatoxico

    jatoxico Minister of Fire

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    Hey Zap do you spray the wood and let it dry or spray directly on the fire? I have the same spray seems to work but don't know if spraying the fire is the best way.
  5. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    We spray it on the fire when it's starting to go pretty good with the bypass still open (we have the Lopi Liberty) usually our stack temp is about 350 when we spray.

    After we spray we shut the door then the bypass, seems to work for us.
  6. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    No chemicals . . . just burn at the right temps with well seasoned wood and check/clean when needed . . . works for me . . . but using the anti-creosote stuff cannot hurt things.
  7. MnDave

    MnDave Guest

    I have a new stove so I am not familiar with its creosote rate. I think it will be significantly less than what I had before which was not too much. After the holidays I plan to run the brush and see what kind of stuff falls out. If it is just soot and not shiny flakes I will reduce the usage of the powder further.

    I like that the brush always gets down to bare metal versus creating a shiny build-up.

    MnDave
  8. Butcher

    Butcher Minister of Fire

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    I use the rutland granular stuff that you put on hot coals and then reload. Might be whiches brew but I do find coffee grounds in my cleanout. Makes cleaning alot less messy. Might be a waiste of money but I get a certain piece of mind from it.
  9. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames Feeling the Heat

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    This is very true. If you just use good dry wood it will be the same as using the creosote chemicals. The chemicals just dry out the creosote so it flakes off the flue rather than sticking. If you are using questionable wood it is not a bad idea to use them. If you have a stainless steel chimney liner, make sure the chemical you have is safe for the liner.
  10. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    My thinking is in line with Butcher and i use it for peace of mind. I have no idea what happens if I don't use it because every couple weeks I throw in a scoop and when I run the bush it all comes clean. I am burning really good wood so probably overkill but at 12$ a tub that lasts a season or two it is cheap piece of mind for me.
    zap likes this.
  11. HotCoals

    HotCoals Minister of Fire

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    I burn oak wood from Backwoods Savage..it is over 300 years old..no creosote ever!
    Beer Belly and jatoxico like this.
  12. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon Minister of Fire

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    Ok, why would my local store who sold me my Quadra-fire Isle Royale tell me absolutely no creosote chemicals should be used????
  13. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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  14. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon Minister of Fire

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  15. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    We use Co-Mate Chimney Cleaner every once in a while......like some others, not sure if it helps, but figured it can't hurt....except my wallet....$20 for a 2 lbs can here
  16. MnDave

    MnDave Guest

    Ok. I just looked at my Quadra Fire Owners Manual under "Chimney and Chimney Connector Inspection/Cleaning"

    "Do not use chimney cleaners or flame colorants in your appliance. It will corrode your pipe."

    MnDave
  17. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    It sounds like the owner's manual may have made the decision to use this stuff for you, however, are the results you mentioned here an improvement over what you found in the chimney before using the product?

    pen
  18. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    The stuff I'm getting is dry and crumbly so I don't mess with the cleaner.
  19. MnDave

    MnDave Guest

    Actually, I have been using this stuff for as long as I can remember. I had a chimney fire in a short fat masonry chimney with a sluggish draft over 20 years ago and that is probably when I started using the stuff.

    I have been using it for over 10 years (sparingly) in my metal chimney which was essentially new when I bought this home. I recently put in a new stove and carefully inspected the connector tee and it looked fine. It is stainless steel.

    But I just looked at my new QF owners manual (because of what Don Williams said above) and it states that the chemicals "will corrode your pipe".

    Maybe plain steel is what they are referring to. Stainless steel is very corrosion resistant.

    MnDave
  20. hockeypuck

    hockeypuck Feeling the Heat

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    I use the Rutland product. Just as others here have said.. it does not replace sweeping, just makes it easier. I burn well seasoned wood, but the creosote ends up as a fine granulated powder when I am done cleaning.
  21. MnDave

    MnDave Guest

    I am a little surprised that a stove company would weigh-in on creosote remover since creosote is not likely to form in the stove and the intended purpose of these creosote products is to prevent chimney fires. .i.e stove safety. I believe they work as my creosote falls off in small flakes.

    I plan to see what chimney manufacturers say about chemicals.

    MnDave
  22. MnDave

    MnDave Guest

    I hear ya honeypuck.
    I think what some of these guys are saying is that if you are burning good wood and keeping the stove hot, you do not need the creosote products. That fine granulated powder you are seeing may not be creosote.

    The way that I ran my old stove I produced creosote as shiny black flakes. I can see where that stuff could ignite and start a chimney fire. In my case I doubt it ever got thick enough to damage the chimney. It took the remover to break that tar-like stuff up. The brush would run right over it.

    With my new stove I rarely see smoke and my stovepipe temps are much higher. Next week I will run the brush and see what is collecting in my chimney. Maybe I'll take a picture and post it here for discussion.

    MnDave
  23. HotCoals

    HotCoals Minister of Fire

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    It's hockeypuck.[​IMG]
  24. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon Minister of Fire

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    What are good stove pipe temps to burn hot enough to discourage creosote? and are we talking 18 inches up? 4 feet up? or where the most likely problem spot for me is...where the pipe makes 2 bends to exit the wall 7 feet up?
  25. HotCoals

    HotCoals Minister of Fire

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    Any part of the pipe/chimney that is below 212 degrees f will be the most susceptible to creosote formation..start up is where a lot of it happens I have been told.

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