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Cutting/chipping cinder block

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by ultimate buzz, Jan 1, 2013.

  1. ultimate buzz

    ultimate buzz New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2013
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    Loc:
    Nekoosa,Wis
    I'm a long time lurker, but this will be my first question/post.

    About a year or two ago, there was a post where someone was going to cut an opening for an insert through some eight inch webbed cement or "cinder" block. They were looking for an alternative to using an abrasive blade in a circular saw or hand held grinder, because they needed to keep the dust in their living area to a minimum.

    Someone on this site had recommended a "chipper" or "nibbler" that enabled the operator to cut or chip through the face of the block in between the webbing to remove the cement block. I have tried using the search feature to locate this older post but have hit a dead end. Does anyone know what I am looking for, what the name or brand of the tool is, and possibly where to buy one? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, -ken

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  2. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    If you run a shop vac or two while cutting it will cut down in the dust. Here is the tool that you mentioned. http://www.as170.com/index2.html
    They are expensive, and still create some dust when used inside. It will be better than a saw though. I would look into renting one.
  3. DMbekus

    DMbekus Member

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    Loc:
    central NJ
    Typically called a chipping gun. They are readably available at most tool rental stores. Good ones new start at about $300.00. I own one and used it to punch through concrete block and clay flue liner in the fall when installing my flue pipe-worked great. They do make some dust. Get a good shop vac with new filter and hold near work area if you want near zero dust from installation.
  4. Eaglecraft

    Eaglecraft Member

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    Buzz:

    I'm not familiar with a cement "nibbler," but you might consider two alternate tools. The first is a "cement board" saw sold under the RIDGID brand, as in Home Depot. I bought one last year for installing cement board siding (HardiPannels). This cement board blade can be replaced with a masonry blade for cutting concrete. This saw # R3401, 5 inch, comes with an attachment that is connected to a "Homer" bucket for capturing the dust. The saw provides its own force to blow the dust into the bucket. Having used the saw many times to cut fiber cement board, I can personally attest that little if any dust escapes from this system. It works like a champ.

    A second tool that might work for you is a rotary hammer dill - from HILTI or from Bosch. These hammer drills can be used with "chipper" blades for chipping away concrete. I used one 3 years ago to install a new Energy Star sliding glass door to a concrete slab. You could have your work partner hold a shop vac on the work while you did the chipping. Hammer drills can be rented from tool rental shops. I don't know about cement board saws, though.

    Good luck with your project.
  5. Eaglecraft

    Eaglecraft Member

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    Webby:

    This is one heck of a masonry tool. I've never seen one before. Did you you rent or buy this tool? I want to remodel my concrete block shop - new doors, etc. I may have to get one of these jobbers to cut through the SMUs.

    Thanks for the tip.
  6. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    I haven't personally used one. We installed a gas fireplace in an existing brick home, a mason used on to remove the brick on the back of the chase. It was very impressive. It's best for removing mortar joints, in turn, bricks. To cut concrete blocks, a gas demo saw, or a circular saw would probably be best. With the circ saw, you can cut from both sides and then chip out the webs.
  7. ultimate buzz

    ultimate buzz New Member

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    Loc:
    Nekoosa,Wis
    Wow! Thanks for the quick replies!

    Webby, I have been chainsaw carving for quite a few years and have heard a lot of horror stories on the different chainsaw carving forums about both the Arbortech and the Lancelot powerheads being extremely dangerous for carving. Knowing that, I might be able to pick one up from one of the other carvers who has one and does not feel comfortable using it, if the attachment for cutting concrete is an available option from Arbortech. Thanks for the info.-ken

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