cutting question # 2

basswidow Posted By basswidow, Apr 5, 2009 at 12:10 PM

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  1. basswidow

    basswidow
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    Oct 17, 2008
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    How do you all seem to get your rounds precisely the same size? I see photos on here and guys seem to cut the rounds exactly the same. Do you measure it out or mark before you cut? All my stuff varies - usually because I cut to avoid knots and such. They all run 12 to 16 inches. Onces split and stacked - my stuff just doesn't look a polished. I guess it doesn't matter how it looks - but how it burns.

    Do you all use those length markers off the saw?
     
  2. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
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    Three methods. Measure with the bar, use a sawbuck, and measure with a stick.
     
  3. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone
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    They aren't the same size. They are close based on the above methods. There's also a pile of shorts that are good for the shoulder seasons.

    Matt
     
  4. Jamess67

    Jamess67
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    Nov 19, 2007
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    all my rounds are exactly 16.25 inches long. LOL I wish. I mark a spot on my bar and use that as a measure stick. then with the tip I nick a spot where to cut.
     
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    Some I measure with a stick and some I just eyeball. Most of the time I can eyeball pretty darned close. I too cut to try to avoid cutting through knots.
     
  6. myzamboni

    myzamboni
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    May 22, 2007
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    So you eyeball and tell the wife where to cut? :)
     
  7. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    Ya, but she doesn't like to listen to me. lol
     
  8. terrywillie

    terrywillie
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    Jul 29, 2008
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    I like the nail, string, and marking crayon, (yellow or white) approach. I can mark two or three cuts and put it in a pocket. That way I only have 4-6 places to look. If I do lay it down at least the color stands out, unlike the stick. I use to use the bar, but then I started loosing them and that really slowed me down.
     
  9. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
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    LOL Ja, I could see where that'd slow you down. I never put a nail in my pocket because invariably when I stick my hand in to retrieve it, the pointy end of it ends up jabbed under my fingernail. I think that's why they call them nails.
     
  10. basswidow

    basswidow
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    After cutting 2 truck loads today, I realize it doesn't matter. I just eyeball it. I'm satisfied with that. Starting to feel like my time is worth more than this. It's so much work and I'd rather spend $ 170 on a cord and have some guy dump it for me - while I'm out on the boat fishing. Never been so sore. I bet those who split at the cut site dont' work as hard. Lifting bigger rounds will wear you out.
     
  11. mainstation

    mainstation
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    get yourself a whip...
    practice makes the difference, cut for a few years and your blocks will measure in within a 1/4-1/2 " in no time. There's no sense cutting 12" wood.
     
  12. Todd

    Todd
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    I always start out measuring with my chainsaw bar, but that goes away pretty fast and I just eyeball it. I end up with anything from 14"-20" and it all burns fine.
     
  13. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1
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    I use my chainsaw to measure off my rounds. Just measure a spot from bar tip to saw housing and mark it. I'm cutting my rounds 20 inches for my Oslo, 16 in. bar.
     
  14. xman23

    xman23
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    I to use the bar measuring method. It's quick, swing the saw sideways and dig the tip in where the cut needs to be. When I'm down to a piece 40 inches long I use a tape measure to find the center.
     
  15. CowboyAndy

    CowboyAndy
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    I also use the saw/bar method. There is a spot on the saw where there to tip is 20", and I dont really spend extra time making sure its perfect, but they all come out roughly the same.
     
  16. Henz

    Henz
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    Mar 23, 2006
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    I have a handy dandy bucking measuring thingy that attaches to my saw that I bought at the saw shop. Works the nutz extends to 20" but I set the tab for 16...I dont like using a stick cause I like to ahve both hands on the saw at all times and not holding a stick at the same time!
     
  17. smokinj

    smokinj
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    I cut where the tree makes me those crochs can be nasty so there is always some that are off a little but its firewood and not going to the mill.
     
  18. mayhem

    mayhem
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    Eyeball. No sense in making a big project out of it in my opinion. Stove will hold 22" splits, I aim for about 20" and only at the very end do I ever wind up with anything outside of 18" or so. The smaller chunks I save up for quick heat or for the wife to pick and choose from in the dead of winter as she does not like loading the longer splits.
     
  19. Jags

    Jags
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    Calibrated elbow. Its just locked in to where to drop the saw next.
     
  20. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
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    Eyeball method . . . cutting up wood doesn't really need to be an exact science . . . as long as they fit into the stove they're all good no matter the size . . . although most are pretty darn close in size . . but then again my wood looks pretty ugly . . . not all nice and straight like some folk's pics -- they're crooked, bent, split up all knarly looking . . . but as long as my ugly wood burns I'm happy.
     
  21. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck
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    I get my wood in all sorts of lengths, which means i have to be flexible when I cut it to stove length. If i find a forty inch piece, I don't cut it into two sixteens and an eight, i try to cut it into three piece of about equal length. This results in three pieces too short for the stove i haven't yet purchased. Now that I think about it, maybe I need to start measuring.
     
  22. xman23

    xman23
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    Wood Duck, Any size that fits in the stove will work. The small 6 inch pieces go in sideways. More wood surface area from small pieces and alternately stacked is what you need to have when you have to light a cold stove. At the beginning and end of the season when we starting new fires 2 or 3 times a day, we don't have enough of the small size pieces.

    That said, when I'm buckin 2 ft diameter oak I don't like to not make one more cut than I have to. So I try to cut ever piece 20 -22 inches. That 40 inch round needs to be cut very close to the center. My stove can fit a 25 inch log. There have been a few 26 that didn't make it.
     
  23. JEEPSTER 401

    JEEPSTER 401
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    Mar 2, 2009
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    I have a short piece of 1" angle welded perpendicular to a 16" piece of 1/2" plate stock. After I take a cut I put the piece of angle against the freshly cut side of the tree and cut at the end of the flat stock. Quick and painless until you hit a huge knot.
     
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