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Damper in flue pipe

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by demo-it, Feb 18, 2014.

  1. demo-it

    demo-it New Member

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    I have a restored Atlanta Stove #27 that burns ferociously. There is no damper to control the draft, can I install a damper in the flue pipe to slow things down a little or will this just cause the smoke to back into the room?

    Thanks

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  2. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    Averill Park, NY, on Burden Lake II...
    You should be able to do that. If you get too much smoke back into the room with the fully closed
    damper position, then you may have another issue with the stove restoration...
  3. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

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    I put a damper in the flue of my Better 'N Ben's I use it more than the air doors to control the fire in mine. I only have puffbacks under certain wind conditions... i.e. my NE farmhouse (meaning all the buildings are connected and about 150' total in length) lies broadside to the near constant west winds in the winter. My Class A chimney is on the leeward side of the peak.. and even though it's 3' above the peak of the roof, under certain conditions the will hit the windward side of the roof, eddy and basically blow straight down my chimney. only happens every now and again... and the fix would probably be another section of chimney, which I will do eventually ($ is the issue atm).

    also, have you replaced all your rope seals, and the box is air tight?
  4. demo-it

    demo-it New Member

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    This box is anything but airtight. I'm not sure it is capable of being airtight. There is a "trough" in front which has a non-gasketted cover which is a funnel for the air. There is no damper or control so the only option I can think of is to put a damper in the flue.
  5. bholler

    bholler Minister of Fire

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    there is no control what so ever? I do not know the stove at all but that sounds like a problem to me
  6. demo-it

    demo-it New Member

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    Here's a pic or two... You can actually see the orange glow beneath the door in the 1 pic. In the other you can see the cover of the trough which I believe is intended to collect ash. Regardless it makes the unit impossible to seal. The door does not close tightly either. 20140220_205312.jpeg 20140220_205129.jpeg
  7. bholler

    bholler Minister of Fire

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    Wow I wouldn't burn that in my house more power to you.
  8. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes it needs a damper. Back in the day, they had different size holes in the center, so when closed the "low burn" was simply closed fully. Watch eBay for a Griswold. You also have to realize when the stove was made, chimneys were shared and even had fireplaces in one room or on another floor, so as the heat rose from this stove, it would allow leaks into the flue from other sources cooling the draft and slowing it down.
    Here's some of my damper collection showing the center hole you won't find in newer dampers today.
    Dampers 1.JPG Dampers 3.JPG

    I'd like to see some pictures of the stove open too. I find it hard to believe there wasn't a closed in piece across the bottom with holes and a slider to control the air. You may find drilled holes that the plate was held on with stove bolts countersunk into the missing plate. You may be missing plate #8 shown below; (Or it's stuck ??)

    Does this look like a break down of the stove ??

    Atlanta Box Stove 27.png

    The bottom pieces are called "suction front, center and back" I believe the center piece 9a moves opening and closing the opening ?? Need pics with it empty AND the bottom !

    Another way to slow it down is to tilt the front lid. This allows barometric air pressure in to fill the void created by chimney draft allowing indoor air to cool the flue, decreasing draft. To cook, you remove the lid and place pan or pot directly over fire. (antique pans will have a "smoke ring" around edge to sit flatter and seal better, but not necessary) Stay with the food !! It cooks fast like stir frying. Quicker than a gas burner, and I have a 30,000 BTU top burner commercial gas stove!

    You did not do "wrong" painting it. Doesn't look like stove black. But you don't paint the top. That gets cooking oil and seasons like a cast iron pan. (stove black doesn't stick and embed itself in machined smooth surface cast like the rest of stove)
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2014
  9. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Here's the piece ! handle / slider ...........
    I knew I've seen them and they are usually missing. You can make something similar;

    Atlanta Box Stove 27 2.JPG

    This stuff is as old as my memory, but held up better ! <>

    This shows the "sunken ash pit" on bottom; Take it apart, you'll figure it out. These old stoves were built with a third grade education. ;em Ok, maybe fifth.........

    http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=154398

    Older but same design with history;
    http://antiquestoves.net/dir/buy-a-heating-stove/box-stoves
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2014
  10. valley ranch

    valley ranch Feeling the Heat

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    I have one of these up in back, not being used. Used it for a while in the hut. I found it had to have a damper in the pipe, or it would consume the fuel and produce almost no heat unless I kept feeding it.

    Richard
  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    With this style stove a pipe damper is a necessity for good control. Open it up when reloading and close it down once the fire is going again.
  12. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Last edited: Feb 21, 2014

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