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Dave A's stacks

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Joful, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Thread moved from the Hearth Room:



    Those wood piles in my photo (above) are about 300 feet from the house, and 400 feet from the end of the house where I actually bring the wood in thru the basement. I keep only 1 cord stacked on the patio outside the basement, which is covered by my porch. So, I have to move a cord up to the house five times per winter, which is only once per month in the shoulder seasons, but more like every second weekend in the cold part of Jan/Feb. I use a tractor with FEL and a utility trailer to move the wood, but am currently debating ways I can move an entire half-cord skid at a time, to limit travel across the often-soggy part of the lower yard.
    Criss-crossing your ends is a time-honored technique, used by many here. It works well, but requires some nice straight and uniform splits to make it come out nicely, and takes more time than just setting up some book ends and stacking like an idiot.
    If you want a privacy fence, I'd build a privacy fence, then stack on your side of it. It will keep the neighbors from complaining about the appearance of your stacks, and eliminate your problems with having to constant burn your fence and move your stacks.
    Pallets are around... but it can take a while to find some sources. I was in your boat a year ago.

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  2. Dave A.

    Dave A. Minister of Fire

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    This house has fairly wide eaves in some areas and we used to keep the firewood next to the walls under the eaves. That was with a fireplace, that ended up not being used for years at a time, and the wood wasn't that good to begin with -- mostly branches from yard pruning. So the wood left there for years began to cause problems. When I began using the insert last year, I rejected storing the wood under the eaves because of the problems. But it might make sense to go back to that, especially since it's not going to sit there more than a few weeks at a time. It would be more convenient and I probably wouldn't have to keep as much in the house.

    I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree about this, but I don't find neatly stacked rows of firewood any less attractive than a stockade wood privacy fence. And since I don't expect to be here more than a couple more years, I don't expect to replace the wood stack fence very many times.

    Even so, same as you do moving your seasoned wood close to the house each year, I'd have to do the same thing, whether there's a fence behind it or not.
  3. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Dave, why not put some posts in the ground at the stack ends? I've been doing it that way for 7 years and it works very well and it's temporary (they'll eventually rot).
    I put a post every 16'.
    Did I miss something else here?
  4. Dave A.

    Dave A. Minister of Fire

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    You mean dig-a-hole kind of post -- 4x4 size?
  5. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Small trees, landscaping posts......no need for 4x4's.
    Piece of cake. I make 'em 8', then bury almost 3', then stack 4-5' high.
  6. Dave A.

    Dave A. Minister of Fire

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    So you make them yourself by taking off the limbs and the bark.
    That would work. Actually even a 4x4 would work, if I had some spares. Wouldn't need that many either. And if buying, pressure treated isn't much more and should last awhile in the ground, too.

    But over then next couple years, till I move, I want to keep it as easy as possible. Just tried the criss cross technique or maybe it's not called that if you don't make a tower. But just changed the direction at the end of the row every few rows tilting up. That seems to work pretty well -- not taking credit -- saw it in a picture in another thread.

    But it is more effort than mindless stacking. If you're putting the posts in the ground and keeping them there for a few years that's probably less extra time than the criss cross. I have to be thinking next winter might be my last here. Don't really have any small trees around that I can think of that have to go, but if I do, I'll give that a try.
  7. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    I've also used the 3x5 landscape things that are half round on 2 sides and flat on 2 sides. They're on sale at HD for $1.97 quite often and are treated.
    I can put one in the ground in about 5 minutes, and it takes longer than that to cross stack an end. Once it's in the ground, it's there for a long time but cross stacking has to be done every time you stack.
    Not knocking that method, but it's not for me.
    Oh, and when I put a log in the ground, I don't bother taking off the bark. It'll come off eventually.:cool:
    NortheastAl likes this.
  8. Dave A.

    Dave A. Minister of Fire

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    I'll look out for them.
  9. NortheastAl

    NortheastAl Minister of Fire

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    I use these landscape timbers to keep the wood off the ground. They are cheap and do the job. I like the idea of using them as end posts too.
    PapaDave likes this.
  10. Dave A.

    Dave A. Minister of Fire

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    Not to beat a dead horse, but also with the privacy fence and then the wood stacked close to it for seasoning, it really wouldn't get the necessary air circulation (picked that up from another thread;) )
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  11. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Air circulation is key if you need to get wood dried fast. Usually an issue for folks in their first year or two of burning, or slackers who can't seem to get ahead. The advice there is to stack in a high sunny spot, in single rows, to get maximum air flowing thru the stacks. On the other hand, having your wood stacked a few feet from a fence isn't going to prevent it from seasoning, if given a proper three years.
  12. Dave A.

    Dave A. Minister of Fire

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    And you're serious about that too. Those who can't/won't/don't want to get several years ahead are "indeed slackers" when it comes to wood burning. Dunno what to say.

    Can't help thinking about my first wood guy from Jersey "Well, you don't want that oak too dry. It'll just burn right up in no time."
    Backwoods Savage likes this.

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