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Dead standing Ash?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Reckless, Aug 6, 2013.

  1. Reckless

    Reckless Feeling the Heat

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    Found this in my woods when dragging stumps with the quad, what you think? Its a monster and there are a few ash trees in the area with leaves. I just don't want to waste my time or my health trying to cut this big boy down for no reason.

    Attached Files:

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  2. blujacket

    blujacket Minister of Fire

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    Looks like Ash to me.
    schlot likes this.
  3. schlot

    schlot Minister of Fire

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    Looks like it.
  4. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    What is monster about it? Looks like an ordinary ash and will make excellent firewood.
    Missouri Frontier and nrford like this.
  5. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    Certainly looks like White Ash to me. If you are still uncertain after you drop it, post some pics of splits before you buck it.
  6. nrford

    nrford Minister of Fire

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    it's ash.
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  7. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut Minister of Fire

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    Go get it. Looks like a nice long straight run before getting to any branches.
  8. Reckless

    Reckless Feeling the Heat

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    Its a good 30-40' tall and 24" across, I mean I have bigger on my property but this will be the biggest I've fallen.

    When I went back out to take measurements I noticed there are 4 dead ones all like this which I didn't see before because its pretty dense out/up there..... what could cause these ash trees to die like this?
  9. blujacket

    blujacket Minister of Fire

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    Not sure if it's hit NY yet, but here in the Midwest, the EAB has/is killing all Ash trees
    ScotO likes this.
  10. Reckless

    Reckless Feeling the Heat

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    BIG BOY DOWN and its a beaut!!! All wood still perfect condition and Im guessing between 1-2 cords.
    It may have gotten here already if this tree is indeed a ash like I think. There are ALOT of ash in the area still alive and well.........

    Attached Files:

  11. schlot

    schlot Minister of Fire

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    Three counties in Iowa have recently reported it. Eastern Iowa but it probably won't be long until we start seeing more reports across the state.
  12. Reckless

    Reckless Feeling the Heat

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    So is this Ash for sure?????? And if it is has this disease reached NY?
  13. Buckeye 2012

    Buckeye 2012 New Member

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    Its not a disease its a bug. Yes it is spreading wildly. Most of Ohio ash trees have been killed or are in the process.
  14. Reckless

    Reckless Feeling the Heat

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    Bug attacks where? Everything I've cut so far is solid, only thing wrong with the tree was there were no leaves.

    And again... is this for sure Ash??????
  15. schlot

    schlot Minister of Fire

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  16. schlot

    schlot Minister of Fire

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    From what I understand it pretty hard to see evidence of an EAB. A D shaped exit hole is one way, but the bug is pretty small so it's hard to spot. I believe there would be trails under the bark left by the critter if it kills the tree.
  17. nrford

    nrford Minister of Fire

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    It is An Ash for sure.
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  18. Reckless

    Reckless Feeling the Heat

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    The fact its missing leaves matches the description but there are no burrow holes that I can see.......
    Fresh split is between 25-30% and since its ash it should be good for this winter no?

    Attached Files:

  19. blujacket

    blujacket Minister of Fire

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    Not likely
  20. schlot

    schlot Minister of Fire

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    Agreed, it might be hard pressed to get it down below 20% by then.
  21. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    It is called the emerald ash borer. Soon there will be no ash trees left. All of ours are dead.

    As for felling the 24" trees, in my opinion it is easier to fell those than the smaller ones.

    Here is what the borer looks like but you won't likely see one. You'll find some D shaped holes in the trees though and if you get any bark off the logs, you'll see a roadmap inside where they have traveled.
    EmeraldAshBorerMale.jpg
  22. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Do not look for the holes in the wood itself. You'll find the holes in the bark. As for burning it this coming winter, I suppose some would but I would not. Never buy into that saying that just because it is ash you can burn it right away. That is nothing but pure baloney. Sure, you can burn it but you won't get but maybe half the amount of heat from it vs burning it after it has time to dry. Even most of our dead ash is not ready to burn when cut. There is a little bit but you have to remember our ash trees started dieing in 2002. That is 11 years ago!
    HDRock, ScotO, Reckless and 1 other person like this.
  23. Reckless

    Reckless Feeling the Heat

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    Sad really. Is there anything I can do to save the ones that are still alive? Im guessing its probably already too late....... As for the 24", it was the first one I fell that big so my heart was going a little, luckily it went exactly where I wanted it to and thank god I had a wedge :) Bucked up about a 1/3 so far of the top end..... the bottom, yea, Im not sure how I am going to get those rounds out of the woods (hope my 2 wheel drive quad is strong enough).

    Thanks for all the info guys!!
    Applesister likes this.
  24. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Basically there isn't much you can do. I have heard of a spray but the cost could be well over $200 per tree and I've heard much higher. That is why there has been very little spraying done. Yes, it is sad. We had a few hundred of those nice white ash.... It hurts.

    As for the felling, that tree looked like it was a good one for you to practice on. The basics are to notch the tree going 1/3 into the tree on the side where the tree wants to fall. Then cut the wedge. From there, you cut from the backside but don't cut on the same level. Go up a couple inches higher than that first cut you made. As you make that back cut, don't cut all the way through. Cut to within a couple inches of where that wedge is and the tree should fall. The part you didn't cut will act as a hinge, keeping the tree falling in the direction you want it to. Sometimes you need to use a wedge or two but I rarely use a wedge for felling. However, I won't hesitate to use them if needed. Most times the tree will have some lean and also a greater number of limbs on the leaning side. This way, Mother Nature has helped you in the felling of the tree. You'll do fine. Just be careful.

    A word of caution, Before you ever make the first cut, remove anything that you might trip over. You want to move away from the tree as it starts to fall. But remember, you do not go straight back nor do you go straight sideways. You want your escape route to be at an angle (45) going away from the tree. Funny that one fellow who I thought knew better turned out to not be so smart. Seems he always cut then ran straight back from the falling tree. Then he complained because he had been hit a few times. "You can't outrun those limbs," said he. Naturally, I then informed him of the proper way to back away from the falling tree.

    Another caution. Always look the tree over and also where it will be falling. Are there any dead limbs? Remember that those can and no doubt will be coming toward Mother Earth. If they are on the tree you are cutting, the vibration from cutting could knock them loose. You do not want to be beneath those. On the surrounding trees, limbs could be broken as the tree falls. You don't want to be in the way of those either.
    Reckless and ScotO like this.
  25. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Definitely an ash tree, and a nice looking firewood tree to boot! As Dennis said, be careful when felling trees. For beginners, make your wedge cut on the leaning side of the tree, also make sure the top weight is on that side of the tree too. Don't bring your back cut the whole way through...leave some hinge wood for the tree to pivot on as it is falling.

    As for the ash borer, it's already begun it's devestation here in central PA. I've had to remove three on our property, and the big one at my brother's place is getting less and less full every year. Just a matter of time. The EAB lives in the layer between the bark and the sapwood. Like Dennis said, it leaves a zig-zaggety, maze-like path behind itself. Peel off some bark, you'll see what I mean if the tree has EAB....

    [​IMG]

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