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degrees of moisture levels in a stack

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by kwikrp, Nov 26, 2008.

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  1. kwikrp

    kwikrp Feeling the Heat

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    Are certian areas on a stack generally drier or seasoned better or quicker than others ? The top compared to the middle or the bottom ?

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  2. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Depends on the area but I find that there is about a two foot blanket of moisture gradient on the ground. The closer to the ground, the more the moisture. In reality there is a much larger gradient of moisture that you can often see on tall metal structures like lattice towers but I doubt you will stack your woodpile over 50 feet.
  3. jpl1nh

    jpl1nh Minister of Fire

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    After today's 40+mph gusts during the torrential rain we got blew part of my well weighted tarp off, the top 2 feet of my stack is the wettest. Aside from that, I agree with LLigetfa. Normally, the tops and outer edges are the driest.
  4. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    Tops.
    I have my stacks top covered.

    Bottoms of the stacks tend to stay wet longer from wind driven rain than closer to the cover that stays relatively drier.

    There may be a bit less wind closer to the ground, too.
    Plus the ground has to evaporate after every rain, too.



    I know from sailing there can be quite a bit more wind higher aloft than at sea level.
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