1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Disappointed w/ my heating bill for 1st yr burner.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Bster13, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    811
    Loc:
    CT
    Yes, 2 x 12in (in the two doorways to my stove/living room) and 1 x 18in (blowing all the way from the sunroom)

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    811
    Loc:
    CT
    Actually, less cozy. It is warmer in the stove room where we hang out, no doubt, but a little colder in her bathroom (where she gets ready in the morning) and the master bedroom (mostly fine with this as we're just sleeping). The biggest kicker is the constant noise and wind storm throughout the house. U need slipper else your feet/ankles get cold. I'm moving some serious air, haha.

    In any event, I think she's settled down to the stove not going away, so I'll just not mention this thread to her. ;)
  3. PLAYS WITH FIRE

    PLAYS WITH FIRE Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Messages:
    639
    Loc:
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    What is your attic insulation like?
  4. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    811
    Loc:
    CT
    To the joists. Old house.... spring time project I guess. Not only insulation but I want to do some air sealing. I guess I was being lazy in that I was hoping I didn't need any home improvement with insulation if I just plopped a stove in and cranked it. It can only overcome so much, haha.
  5. PLAYS WITH FIRE

    PLAYS WITH FIRE Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Messages:
    639
    Loc:
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Early spring!!!!!!!! Or now!!!!!!!! When I did mine it was, I thought, early spring...whew! I have a very low pitched roof and had to do all work on my stomach and back, it sucked! I am now prepped for blow in with a blanket of r-30 pink stuff. I have about an r45 now but I think r60 is required. I want to replace my ac but the air handler is in the attic. The blown in will be after the ac is replaced.

    Home Depot has r30 unfaced 11.87 a roll cost me like 300 bux or something plus minus the tax thing..
  6. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Messages:
    1,612
    Loc:
    SE Mass

    you might try pulling the fans in the doorway back into where the cold air is coming from. I use a small 3" fan way back at the end of the hallway, about 10' from the door opening to the stove room. It works much better than in the door opening. Smaller fans would use less energy. I think its more about encouraging a natural draft heat exchange process, not brute wind power.
    PapaDave likes this.
  7. oconnor

    oconnor Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Messages:
    1,069
    Loc:
    Nova Scotia
    I see you have average temps listed in your chart. How was it calculated? I did a similar calculation here, but used "Heating Degree Days". You can usually look up the number of HDD for a given month for your area online, or possibly from your gas supplier.
    SuperGenius likes this.
  8. firebroad

    firebroad Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2011
    Messages:
    1,521
    Loc:
    Carroll County, MD
    Bster, look at it this way. You will recoup your losses, just not as quickly as you wanted. As you get more accustomed to cooler temps, you will find you cannot even sleep unless the temp is 65 or below. (Yes, I am a woman!) Also, once you seal the place up it will make a world of difference.
    And the most important part of burning: You are using a RENEWABLE resource, rather than having the earth poisoned by fracking and such. Not to mention the quality work out you get, even if it is only moving and stacking!
    Ubookz and Bster13 like this.
  9. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    811
    Loc:
    CT
    All the data is from the gas company.
  10. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Messages:
    1,612
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    +1 on the sealing/attic insulation. I had MASS save put in 6" blow in above the joist tops. Also, the sides of the masonry chimney are a wicked air loss area. They sealed it up with aluminum sheeting. You can only go so far with certian constraints, for example I have a 18 pane bow window that is basically floor to ceiling and about 9' wide. it was built by hand on-site in 1955 with the house. it has double pane glass, but its still inefficient by today's standards. Its a focal point of the front of the house, so we're no going to replace it.
  11. ohlongarm

    ohlongarm Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2011
    Messages:
    745
    Loc:
    Northeastern Ohio
  12. ohlongarm

    ohlongarm Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2011
    Messages:
    745
    Loc:
    Northeastern Ohio
    Well that sucks,my entire bill for a year including hot water is$400 max.

  13. Bigfoot

    Bigfoot Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2009
    Messages:
    67
    Loc:
    Hi Desert Southern California 3000' level
    CUT the natural gas off 100% on the heating, that will get ya there, we did & yea its cold unless you work that fire, good luck!
    firebroad and fox9988 like this.
  14. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2013
    Messages:
    1,082
    Loc:
    NE Ohio
    I don't think you need to move that much air. :eek: ;) It is surprising how much a single small fan running on low will do to disperse heat over time.
  15. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    811
    Loc:
    CT
    I dunno, it will get into the mid teens this evening and mid 20s during the day. How many times are u guys reloading your stoves? Something tells me I won't get an all day burn if I push my stove harder. And the stove room is 76, just difficult to get the heat out of the room.
  16. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    31,018
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    How "new to me" is the house?
  17. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    811
    Loc:
    CT
    Bought it last May 1st 2012.
  18. Charles1981

    Charles1981 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2013
    Messages:
    674
    Loc:
    Michigan
    If you are still using the NG for heating I would guess that a 50% reduction in use is pretty darn good, but I can see how you would be dissapointed as you were expecting more.

    What happens if you turn off the NG stove however? We got the wood stove and I have turned the breaker off to all my baseboard electric heaters. We are only heating the house with the stove. Sometimes we wake up to a cool house in the morning depending on how early we went to sleep and how late we woke up but it still is always warmer than trying to heat soley with electric heat.
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2013
  19. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    811
    Loc:
    CT
    How cool is "cool" to you?
  20. Charles1981

    Charles1981 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2013
    Messages:
    674
    Loc:
    Michigan
    It depends on when I reloaded the stove last versus when we go to sleep which as much as I want it to be a regular schedule it isn't.

    The coldest we have woken up to is 64 in the morning.

    When we moved in and just had electric heat it was costing us 450$ a month to keep the house at 65-66 all day and we were keeping some rooms 57-58 at night.

    Now with the wood stove the basement/stove room is close to 85-90 all the time. Our bedroom in the basement/walkout is always around 75-80. Our upstairs is almost always ~71 degrees even now when it is 8 degrees outside. But it is the upstairs that takes a hit in the morning if we went to bed earlier and slept in which happens frequently an the upstairs is around 64-66 and downstairs is 75 or so.

    Often I find myself loading the stove at 7-8 pm. We goto bed at 11pm-12am. Wake up at 8-9am and at best we get 8-9 hour burn times, so the house can cool down significant in the extra 2-3 hours we are sleeping. But even after 12-13 hours between reloads the stove is still 150-200 degrees with enough small coals that I can stoke a fire without having to go crazy with kindling and paper (usually just put in small splits and leave the door open for 5 minutes and the small coals burst long enough to light the small stuff off easily).

    Now heating an an all electric house is 100$ a month (1900 sq ft rancher). Saving 350 a month AND keeping the house way warmer at the same time. Its still going to take 4-5 years for the stove to pay or itself, but if you think about that fact that we can't actually heat the house to 80 degrees with electric baseboard (or else have an electric bill of like 700-900 a month) then it becomes kind of a moot point.
  21. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    4,087
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Just turn the heat off. Put a small oil filled heater in the room she gets ready in. Put a timer on it, set it for hour or two before she gets up. Problem solved! :)

    Have you noticed all those fans helping anything? I think they work in some layouts but not all. I pulled a fan out for the first time this year the other day. I ran it for a day and shut it off, I can't stand the cool air blowing over my feet and the degree difference I seen in the other room just isn't worth it.
    gyrfalcon likes this.
  22. mwatt65

    mwatt65 Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2013
    Messages:
    47
    Loc:
    West Orange NJ
    This time last year we had used over 300 gallons of oil, so far this year the oil has been on five of six times for one hour at the most each time! (less than 35 gallons)
    We did have to put curtains in three rooms to help with the drafts. House has never been as warm, sitting in a tee-shirt writing this.
    Fire has been running 24/7 since Thanksgiving.
    pen likes this.
  23. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Messages:
    5,225
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    Be careful not to set the boiler standby too low on a lower efficiency boiler. If the standby is less then 140F, condensation will occur in the heat exchanger and that will lead to rust. Then you get to replace the boiler when it rusts through. I turned my standby as low as I felt comfortable and then insulated the snot out of my piping so I didn't lose any heat. This is still quite a bit less than the installer had it. I use my boiler for hot water so I didn't want to heat my basement during the summer.
  24. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    811
    Loc:
    CT
    My fans definitely make a difference. Next year we may cut vents in the top of the walls of the stove room, but not this year.
  25. Hoozie

    Hoozie Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2012
    Messages:
    205
    Loc:
    Klamath Basin, Oregon
    +1 That's what I would (did) do. You can even get a cheap kill-a-watt meter to figure out exactly how much it's using.

    My wife has an oil radiator on low in her office, and one of those funky heat dish things pointed right at her. Although now that it isn't -20 at night, maybe the stove can actually make it that far across the house !!!

    Unless you can get under the house to install a cold air return. But then you'd have a cold source in the stove room. Hmm...

Share This Page