1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Do you bring your kids to cut wood?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by CowboyAndy, Nov 6, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. chad3

    chad3 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Messages:
    453
    Loc:
    Southeast CT
    Daughter helps start the fires and she "knocks the wood as she walks by it". She'll help next year I'm sure. Good girl. Love burning, but as of now understands the steps. I used the lighter for the grill today and as soon as I picked it up, she asked about lighting the stove. Right now she crumbles the paper, hands me the kindling and gives me the small splits for the first fire. She even asks me to make them smaller off the bat.
    I love her. She will make a man happy a few (ha, ha) years from now. Her first rifle is already sitting here.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. North of 60

    North of 60 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2007
    Messages:
    2,449
    Loc:
    Yukon Canada
    My boys are 5.5 & 2.5yrs. They sit back and eat their raisins when Im cutting. They stay in the truck if Iam falling. But
    do their very best to help daddy when they can.

    Attached Files:

  3. CowboyAndy

    CowboyAndy New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    744
    Loc:
    Chateaugay, NY
    MY wife grew up on a farm too, and EVERYONE was expected to do their part. My daughter just doesn't seem to have the same work ethic as anyone else around her. I think I am going to let her off the hook, but my boy must help (and he will get something special for it).

    I like the idea of the air horn. Usually when we are felling a tree, they have to stand at the FRONT of the truck (which is parked where it is well out of harms way) and must remain there until I say so, not when the tree comes down (never know what can happen).
  4. AceRyder

    AceRyder New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2008
    Messages:
    24
    Loc:
    Central NJ
    My 6 year old son and 4 year old daughter love to help when it comes to stacking wood and actually do a pretty good job. But it's usually short lived.. Once the chainsaw starts, they usually run the other way.
  5. willisl64

    willisl64 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2008
    Messages:
    68
    Loc:
    South Central IA
    My 2 yr old son loves to go to the woods with us....Thinks the saw and splitter are too loud to get too close, which is great. He also "helps" stack on occasion
  6. Cazimere

    Cazimere Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    Messages:
    224
    Loc:
    Delmarva
    I wouldn't allow children in the woods with me while felling, limbing or bucking.
    It's bad enough i have to scold adults and homeowners about staying clear while i'm cutting.
  7. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    Messages:
    15,972
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    Thats funny when I start my saw you cant find anyone!
  8. bruce56bb

    bruce56bb New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    333
    Loc:
    Flint Hills of Kansas
    north

    that pic is great.
  9. mranum

    mranum New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2008
    Messages:
    96
    Loc:
    Wisconsin
    We had the usual chores to do too on the farm along with helping to keep the house warm. I can remember helping clear the brush when I was 7 or 8 and by the time I was 10 I was helping on the buzz saw. We learned about hazards and safety early on. There is something to be said about giving kids responsibility early depending on the kids maturity. I was raking hay by myself a couple miles from home at 10 years old driving a 50 hp tractor to boot.

    Giving kids meaningful tasks to do is a sure way to get them to want to help in the future, it makes them feel important.
  10. RedRanger

    RedRanger New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
    Messages:
    1,428
    Loc:
    British Columbia
    All 3 of mine helped up till about 12 years of age. After that--well we all know what teenagers are like.? Looking back, I think we should invent a new defination for teenagers=lazy slugs :cheese:

    Now the youngest is 25 and the oldest almost 31-and when they come to visit, boy, do they love the heat of that wood insert. Still clueless though me thinks, about how that heat gets in and out of that firebox. :wow:
  11. Jeff S

    Jeff S Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2008
    Messages:
    302
    Loc:
    Kimball,Michigan
    My children are son(9).daughter(15),son(17),I try to have one of them helping me at all time,sometimes all of them when there not busy with there own activities.
  12. DavidV

    DavidV New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Messages:
    792
    Loc:
    Richmond VA
    My 9 year old and my 12 year old help gather the wood that I've cut and put it in the truck I have them bring me wood in the back yard when I'm stacking. The 12 year old really enjoys splitting with the splitting axe....I won't let him near the splitter. My daughter who is away at college used to love stacking wood. She would turn on her MP3 player and go to town. The boys would pull splits off the pile and take them over to her and she would make some really nice tight stacks. She called home the other day and told me to make sure there is plenty of wood to stack on Thanksgiving break....and some to split as well. She never really was good at splitting it but she liked to try.
    My wife will get up and walk out on the porch to grab some wood to put in the stove... :)
  13. fattyfat1

    fattyfat1 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2008
    Messages:
    104
    Loc:
    SW WASHINGTON
    when I was five, I was helping my dad gather wood, he shut the saw off but the chain was still spinning, I ran in to grab the round, and hit my head on the bar. chain cut a kerf out of my skull along with a three inch scar I have to this day. my two boys (4 & 6) are not allowed ANYWHERE near me when the saw starts, or the tractor is running, or the logsplitter is splitting. they love to carry and stack though. This summer I tossed those two in the back of my truck, and they handed me and my wife every piece of a cord of wood to stack in the shed. very helpful little guys. ( they even have their very own toy chainsaws so they can "help" me cut, and I took my axe, outlined it on plywood, cut out the shape, so the each have their own "axe" to help dad split.)
  14. Falcon

    Falcon New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2008
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    Battle Creek, Michigan
    Ditto. I grew up on a fruit and dairy farm. By age 15, I was driving equipment worth 4 times more than the annoyed driver of the German sports car following me down the road. The work never ends on a dairy farm, but hey, we had an endless supply of apple wood to burn! My family still runs the farm, and my 4 boys have all had regular tastes of an honest days work. They are 21, 19, 16, and 14. This summer we re-roofed & re-guttered the house in June, and put up 10 CSS cords from July through the start of school. My wife has been turned into a wood-splitting monster! She taunts us if we don't keep up. Who'd have thunk it?

    My older two will do anything I do, perhaps with less precision. The younger two only use the saws, splitter, etc. with supervision. The day before my 19 year old went back to school, I caught him up on the roof, he said he was "just looking at it". Tell me he didn't have a sense of ownership in a difficult job well done. I involve my kids as much as I can.

    The ability to be self reliant is one of the most important things a child can learn...does wonders for their confidence in everything else they choose to do. Helps out when I'm having a "bad-back day" too.
  15. Cory92

    Cory92 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Messages:
    37
    Loc:
    Central Ohio
    My 12 year old says " But Dad I don't want to" It's not about what what you want, It's aboout what I need you to do. Needless to say she and her 4year old twin sisters helped me stack wood for and hour and a half and had the time of their lives.
  16. Chris S

    Chris S New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2008
    Messages:
    339
    Loc:
    Orange County NY
    My kids helped with the splitter and stacked wood when they were younger. The youngest would always last the longest- running the splitter valve at 6 or 7 years old.
    It was always a " chore"
    We gave up woodburning when oil was .70/ gallon, but are getting back into it now.
    I told my 2 sons 21 & 17 that they should sell some wood this year, I have 30+ cord on the ground. So one Saturday in September they set to work, and they were stacking it neatly. I said they should just leave a pile & figure out how many bucket loads make a cord. Their answer was Ok, but this wood's for you! Wow.

    As for the girls- they will work till the piles is gone, and they all tried my wifes MS18 saw but don't like it. So they stack & drive the tractor. Neither believes in male oriented work- they both worked constuction and worked hard at it I had all 4 of them on a roof last Christmas break- they aall paid their car insurance that way before going back to college. My younger daughter (now 19) solders pipe when I'm talking with the client for too long. Not as good as her brother, but he's had a lot more experience. I'm lucky they all have good work ethic. Now if I could only find a place to hide that MS18 where she can't find it!
  17. crazy_dan

    crazy_dan New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2007
    Messages:
    857
    Loc:
    Missouri
    my boys are 7 and 8 and they will put in a full days work started when they could walk on their own now at least I do not have to cut down to the 1.5" stuff so they can carry some :)
  18. Danno77

    Danno77 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2008
    Messages:
    4,983
    Loc:
    Hamilton, IL
    Heck yeah, he helps! That freaking Gator cost me (I mean, santa) an arm and a leg, so I better get some use out of it.

    Attached Files:

  19. dvellone

    dvellone Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Messages:
    449
    No. Any aspect of the process from felling to bucking to splitting and even stacking has too many unpredictable dangers no matter how careful you are.
    My kids are too small anyways - 4+6. I would probably think about starting them from the backend first - stacking - and as they get older work them up towards felling by the time their, oh maybe 40? :lol:
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page