Does wood "season" over the winter?

kubes14060 Posted By kubes14060, Dec 1, 2010 at 12:05 AM

  1. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    One cannot compare good wood vs punky junk even in the drying process. There is just too much difference in the two.
     
  2. oldspark

    oldspark
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    So George was drying out?
     
  3. golfandwoodnut

    golfandwoodnut
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    Well his wood was shrinking.
     
  4. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd
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    Did you really just say that wood needs rain to dry? Rilly?
     
  5. Skier76

    Skier76
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    Interesing thread.

    I ordered another cord of wood last week so I could have it stacked for the winter. It's next year's wood, but I figure the extra few months of drying time won't hurt the situation.
     
  6. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood
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    Yep, also means that if you have a sloppy wet spring or just don't have time, your wood is already drying when the warmer weather comes.
     
  7. oldspark

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    Thats the reason I like to get it stacked it the fall and winter, you never know what spring will bring and I do NOT think the wood drys that much in the winter, sure a little here and there but for me the real drying season is march to november.
     
  8. Skier76

    Skier76
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    Maybe I'll do a little experiment.

    The cord I had delivered last week had a lot of white birch in it. I'll see if I can get a reading on the ol' moisture meter this weekend. Once spring rolls around, I'll do anther test. This should give us an idea of what happens over the winter. Totaly unscientific, but we'll at least have a rough idea. :lol:
     
  9. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller
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    So true. It's amazing how quickly it dries once the outside temps drop and the air loses basically all its water holding capacity. Once that air infiltrates your home, the relative humidity nose dives and the nose bleeds start. But I say, let the drying fun begin. Adds a bunch of much needed humidity to the air as well.

    I can only get about a cord in there, though. The rest of the space is filled with about 10 cord of metal, glass, and wood working tools.
     
  10. Rockey

    Rockey
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    Ha. You refer your tools and misc. in terms of cords too. When I was looking for garage plans this past spring I kept asking everying for a 90 corder. They all looked at me funny.
     
  11. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood
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    Damn, I put the wall on the wrong side of the shed. Honey, just nail those picture hangars right into the ends of the big splits :lol:
     

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  12. formula_pilot

    formula_pilot
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    I agree, punky wood is somewhat like trying to dry out a smelly sponge, fresh cut wood is quite different.
     
  13. John the Painter

    John the Painter
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    Yes the wood will dry in the winter.The "dry" frosty air will help pull out the moisture.
     
  14. graycatman

    graycatman
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    I think someone posted a link to this article on equilibrium moisture content of wood last season. It shows the EMC for various temps at various relative humidities, as well as EMC for each month for various places around the country. It may surprise you.

    http://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/5913
     
  15. burntime

    burntime
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    I know the 2 ash and 2 hickory I just dropped are splitting and checking. Me thinks its drying :lol:
     
  16. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
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    When I was in my 20's and living hand-to-mouth, I would measure firewood seasoning in weeks, not months, and certainly not years. I was mostly scrounging Birch culls from a plywood mill. I would buck it up short, burn the end pieces right away and let the rest season for a few weeks. A few more days inside near the stove and it was golden.

    I spent a Winter trapping on a remote island and we cut most of our firewood late in the Fall and it all burned that Winter. Mind you, all this was before the advent of EPA stoves.

    Until recently, I would buck up wood one Winter and burn some of it the folowing Winter. The wood that was all bucked at the same time burned better in February than it did in November. Proof that it did season between Nov and Feb.

    Also until just recently, I would just toss all my splits in a heap and then move it to the shed late Fall. Now the heap would not season evenly. The splits on the top would be ready to burn but the splits in the middle needed more time. The stuff on the bottom needed much more time. I would sort it into now, later, and much later stacks in the shed and burn it in that order. I would select splits from the "much later" stack for overnight burning and as the Winter progressed, I could see the difference in how well it burned.

    Another measure is shrinkage. I would stack the wood tight to the rafters and see a space form over the course of the Winter. Also, the last row of wood would shrink more on the exposed face than it would on the backside and as a result the stack would lean out and need to be continually pushed back to prevent it from toppling.
     
  17. oldspark

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    Like some one else stated, its not that it does not dry at all in the winter it just drys way less than the warmer months.
     

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