Done for now!

rdust Posted By rdust, Jul 28, 2009 at 12:48 AM

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 9, 2008
    7,361
    110
    Loc:
    NW Ontario
    I have another theory on that besides good looks. A regular sloped pile is too aerodynamic and as such the air tends to just skim over the top. A pile with stacked sides presents itself as a vertical face to the wind and as such the wind is channeled into the stack. The same stacked sides reduce the amount of sprawl so the core closer to the ground is not as far from the surface and the wind more apt to reach it.
     
  2. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 3, 2008
    6,770
    63
    Loc:
    Syracuse NY
    I am up over 12 ft in the center and the sprawl has definitely become an issue. I want that area to hold 4-5 years of wood, so the sprawl will have to be addressed at some point.
     
  3. wendell

    wendell
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 29, 2008
    2,026
    10
    Loc:
    Madison, WI
    I had posted this picture before as this is how I have 2010/11 stacked.

    [​IMG]



    The stack is now actually twice as big and I stacked a row of pallets vertically in the middle to allow airflow and this is how I am considering stacking my third year. Will that space created by the pallets get enough air to the center?
     
  4. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 3, 2008
    6,770
    63
    Loc:
    Syracuse NY
    I like the wire fence especially with the kids. Is it 4'? How long are the stacks? Could a kid pull the fence over if they climbed it in the middle?
     
  5. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 9, 2008
    7,361
    110
    Loc:
    NW Ontario
    That fence reminds me of some pics I saw a while back of huge round corn bins full of wood. I couldn't find the pics that were posted here but here is a small empty corn bin.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 3, 2008
    6,770
    63
    Loc:
    Syracuse NY
    Think 4-5 years would fit in there?
     
  7. Stephen in SoKY

    Stephen in SoKY
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 20, 2008
    333
    14
    Loc:
    Southern Kentucky
    I know a fellow that tried the corn crib system. His was only two rings intsead of the three ring above. Ran his wood up a hay/grain elevator and filled it full. Started trying to access his wood & soon found whenever he pulled a stick loose, it rained splits on top of him in a VERY dangerous manner. Wound up putting a ladder up & cutting a hole in the side then hand throwing his wood out. The old boys ankles were a sight to see. Even with boots on during the unloading all that shifting wood bruised & cut him up badly. IIRC, when spring finally arrived he was about half way down the bottom ring and offered the wood free to anyone who'd take it.
     
  8. wendell

    wendell
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 29, 2008
    2,026
    10
    Loc:
    Madison, WI
    The fence is 6' tall and the stack is about 14" long, now about 7' deep and it was 6' tall but now closer to 5'. The openings are pretty small so I would think that it would be difficult to climb. If you notice the ropes, they now connect the front and back to help secure it.
     
  9. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 3, 2008
    6,770
    63
    Loc:
    Syracuse NY
    Now that's a good lesson for someone else to learn for you. A lot of the farmers around here use corn bunks built with those 6x2x2 interlocking concrete blocks on a slab. They are nice because they drive on top of the banks on either side and easily unload from the fields. Then, they can access with a payloader or skidsteer from the ends. Thinking maybe a modified version with the concrete blocks on one side and a cage like they have in warehouses on the other might be the trick. It would probably double the amount I currently get in the heap and I could still run the tractor in from the side in the fall. I vaguely recollect from an earlier phase of life that those cages can withstand the abuse of forklifts pretty well, so wood being tossed and my tractor shouldn't be too bad.
     
  10. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 3, 2008
    6,770
    63
    Loc:
    Syracuse NY
    Thanks...my shed is 30+' long and I stack 8-9 ft high. Although the two rows get leaned against the back wall and the kids are good about staying away from it, I think something like your solution may be prudent.
     
  11. ikessky

    ikessky
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 2, 2008
    862
    24
    Loc:
    Northern WI
    I told myself tonight that I shouldn't cut down the big white ash I was looking at. Needless to say, it is now sitting in a pile waiting to be split. I think I might have a problem!
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page