DR Power Wagon

Shari Posted By Shari, Sep 11, 2013 at 10:21 PM

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  1. Shari

    Shari
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  2. begreen

    begreen
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    I have a split mover already that's much more useful. It's a Ford Ranger pickup truck.
     
  3. Shari

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    BG - I'm talking about moving splits from splitter to woodpile and then, when the splits are needed, move splits from woodpile to front door of the house.
     
  4. begreen

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    Moving the splits to the woodshed is what I use the pickup truck for. We still move the splits from the shed to the house in a big garden cart. I could use the the lawn tractor and cart, but it's less hassle to do this manually. And it always starts in the winter.
     
  5. Shari

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    I wonder if that DR Wagon would do through snow? Last winter hubby broke his leg and of course the stacks we were pulling splits from was at the back lot line.

    I haven't been successful using the snowblower on my riding mower to make a path in the snow across the lawn. The slope is a bit downhill - I can go down with the rider but can't get the rider back up the hill even though I have chains on it. :( I used my Otter sled, loaded it up and pulled it up. That was quite a workout. At the time I was beginning to plan a way to tie a rope to the sled and the other end of the rope to my SUV which was on the driveway.

    I have determined if we get a 12" snowfall we have 12" in the front yard and 24" in the backyard where the wood stacks are located. :)
     
  6. BrianK

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    I've seen them on Craigslist fairly often. Use a CL search engine like http://zoomthelist.com/ and you might find one local. Used ones typically range from $650-1400.
     
  7. begreen

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    Shari, with snow a constant winter obstacle I can see why this would be important. Our garden cart has big bicycle wheels that cut through 12" snow ok. But the route from the shed to the house is all downhill so it has gravity assist. And fortunately in our case snow is a rarity. The DR might do ok with chains in deeper snow. Give them a call and ask.
     
  8. MasterMech

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    What do you have for rear weights on it? Frame weights? Wheel Weights?
     
  9. Shari

    Shari
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    I've got wheel weights & chains - plus me (LOL) for weight.

    I've thought maybe if I could get all the way down the slight incline and then turn around maybe I could get back up the hill - but I'm not that confident about that and getting stuck would be a real mess if the machine was turned around with the blower facing up hill.

    If I got stuck going down I think I could tow the rider back up the hill by hooking up to the hitch on the rear of the rider but there would be no way to attach a tow line to the blower end.
     
  10. lukem

    lukem
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    I could buy an actual dump truck for $2k.
     
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  11. Jags

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    I have often thought of building one of these things, just not sure how useful it would be for my specific situation.
     
  12. Shari

    Shari
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    Jags et al,

    I prefer to split on our driveway - easy to unload the trailer there as we are on a suburban lot. Some racks are at the back lot line so I split into our yard trailer and tow the splits to their stacking area. The trailer and riding mower that tows it are too wide to get between my stacks so I end up with a lot of hand carrying armfuls of splits into the 16-20' long stacks. I'm thinking the DR is narrow enough to get between the stacks for easy off-loading. If the DR could handle snow it would be a slick way to bring splits up to the house as I need them.
     
  13. Jags

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    Hmmm...the narrower - the easier to steer (manually). Electric start with an electric actuator to make it a dump box would be pretty slick, also.==c

    ETA - downside to narrow is stability.
     
  14. Jags

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    Just watched the video - I guess I wasn't the only one with the idea of a power dump.

    I like this one. Add a plow on the front, and plow your way to the pile.;lol
     
  15. gzecc

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    I use a 420 deere garden tractor with bar tires and a snow blade to pull a 5x8 trailer up and down a slight hill in my yard all winter. Of course the tractor also mows my grass, moves mulch, yard debris, plows snow, etc.....
    Its probably worth 3k? Whats nice about the 420's is the locking differential (rear axle) in the snow.
     
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  16. lukem

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    We rented something similar to this (powered wheel barrow) on a job years ago for hauling in some concrete we were pouring. It was about 1000' slightly uphill and couldn't get a truck in there. It was OK at best. Traction was an issue even with that much weight on it.

    We also rented one of those dingo stand-up skid steers. When I first saw it I thought it was a joke, but that little thing was a beast. Big $ for a small machine though.
     
  17. Jags

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    It would still be fun to build one. The one I am thinking of would be a ride on model, not walk behind. "T" handle steering on the rear.
     
  18. bentrice

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  19. lukem

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    That's pretty much what this was...you stood on the back and T handle'd the steering. It would be fine on solid ground. Would probably be a 36 beer project.
     
  20. Shari

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    I could come up with 36 beers. :)
     
  21. Jags

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    Shari - you would want no part of my beer budget during projects like this.;lol
    36 beers wouldn't even get the parts gathered up.;)
     
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  22. lukem

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    That thing has to be darn near impossible to back up with a garden tractor. Hay wagons are bad enough and they are a lot bigger...and length is your friend when it comes to backing up a trailer ;). Backing up a wagon is an art.
     
  23. lukem

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    The one I used looked a lot like this critter, except it was yellow.
    barrow.JPG
     
  24. Bigg_Redd

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    My old man has been using one of these for 15 years or so. He likes it. I think it'd work fine in 4"-5" of snow but it doesn't have the clearance for more than that.
     
  25. Backwoods Savage

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    Shari, is there any way you could use a winch?
     
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