1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Drain size and how to exit

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by jeff3447, May 27, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. jeff3447

    jeff3447 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2008
    Messages:
    5
    Loc:
    Southwest Ohio
    I am running drain tile that is draining a roof area of approx. 680 sq feet. I have installed 4" tile for this run, the total length of the run is about 80 feet. I have another area of roof that I am draining that is approx. 640 sq. feet, this would tie into the other run at about the 60 foot mark. If I try to tie these two runs together would that be too much for a 4" pipe? Should I run them parallel to one another rather than join them? Also if I maintain a 1/8" drop the drain tile will never make it above ground, the top of the tile would be right at ground level. This being the case what is my best option for dissipating the water? I have seen talk of using popups, I have also considered excavating an area and filling it with gravel to do it. Any other ideas or options?

    Thanks
    Jeff

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2006
    Messages:
    6,984
    Loc:
    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    I have been researching a similar issue.
    If you already have the trench open, might as well do a separate pipe for each downspout.
    As far as depth, if you don't go below the frost line for your area, your wasting your time, as it will freeze up and the water & ice will back up, rendering the drain tile useless until it thaws. There is aso a potential for the piping to brake or crack if it freezes.
    Most folks use a pit filled with stone. Keep in mind depending on the soil make up & density, during a very hard rain, the pit can back up if more water is coming in than it can release.
    You can also use a concrete cauldron made for this also, most usually have some type of pump in them to pump the water elsewhere.
    Best bet if possible is to extend the drain piping to a point where it can daylight out the side of a hill, which eliminates pooling, ponding & back up.
    Take your time & research your options. Talk to a few local excavators, thats what I did. You should get that piping below the frost line most importantly.
  3. jeff3447

    jeff3447 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2008
    Messages:
    5
    Loc:
    Southwest Ohio
    Thanks for the input. Unfortunately my lot is very flat so I cant get it down below the frost line, at least not the entire run. A small portion of it is at 24" then it does get to some slope. Im also not able to extend it to where I can run it outside a hill, Im stuck running into the middle of the front yard then letting gravity take over. Also the soil has a very high clay content, apparently its a former lakebed, not going to be easy.

    Thanks again for the input,
    Jeff
  4. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2006
    Messages:
    6,984
    Loc:
    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    How flat the lot is should not matter. You can dig the trench as deep as you need to get below the frost line. You do want the piping to pitch towards the pit you are running the water to.
    Looks like a pit with stone is your only option. My father has same set up at his house and it works well. Any way you do it, it must be deep enough to be below the frost line(except of course right where it meets the downspout at the house).
    Just be careful of sewer, electric lines etc. The local utility or public works dept can mark them for you.
  5. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,299
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    I also had a daylighting problem with a combined downspout/curtain drain run. If you just end the pipe into gravel then all of the junk that runs down your downspouts will accumulate in the last section of pipe that stays submerged all the time. No real choice here, it will be wet at the end of your run. Also consider that if you're too shallow that your lawnmower will crush it. At least a pop up will allow you to maintain depth as well as locate the outlet. Keeping it clear.

    The typical pipe at HD is 4" and it is cheap. A single 6" pipe flows more water than 2-4" pipes but it is much more expensive, it can be run flatter. You'll need to compare the price of 2-4" pipes to a single 6" pipe.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page