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Drying wood in the oven???

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by barrettdp, Jan 18, 2011.

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  1. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    Use your woodstove as a de-humidifier. Stack as much firewood in the stove room as posible. Keep it a few feet from the stove. Buy a pallet of bio-bricks and burn them. There are many threads on bio-bricks. Use the search feature. Have patience with the wood. It will dry inside due to the heat and low humidity. A couple weeks or more. Never seen a turkey in the oven burst into flames.

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  2. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

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    We speak fluent glass here. Well, my wife does, I only dabble with the stuff... just because it's playing with fire and all. It's funny how often we hear that. I think I even remember my chemistry professor telling us that when we were studying crystal structure. We once bought some antique poured glass panels, and the guy was showing my wife how it was thicker at the bottom because it slowly "melted" over the years. How he knew which end was up when it was glazed into the window frame I'll never know.

    Of course, in this place, we have no problem getting it to flow at slightly higher than room temperature....


    [​IMG]
  3. jlove1974

    jlove1974 Member

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    If you do this, make sure you use Hickory, Apple, or a similar wood. Put in oven at around 270 degrees.
    Wet wood thoroughly before putting into oven. Add desired white meat. Smoke til done ;)
  4. logger

    logger Minister of Fire

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    Didn't get it. Ill send you one and see if that works, but my inbox is empty.
  5. Rachel Porter

    Rachel Porter New Member

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    Wow, talk about unsolicited rudeness. I've been trying to figure out how to quickly dry firewood and so far, all the responses I have found have been: 1) "It needs to dry for a year" (I understand that is how you're SUPPOSED to do it, but this is obviously not what I am asking about) or 2) "What a stupid idea, city folk etc etc"

    I'd like to point out that in order to be a "city person" you must be resourceful, creative, and brave enough to try new things. City people do not do things a certain way just because that's how generations of family members have done them, and unlike some "country folk", are not incapable of imagining new ways to get things done. Before you're rude to someone who doesn't know how to start a fire (because there are, actually, higher callings than fire starting) try to have some compassion. It takes all kinds.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Welcome Rachel. You are responding to a 2+ year old thread. This is a common topic which has many other threads on it. In an urban environment your best bet is going to be bring the wood indoors and if possible have a fan blow across it. Wood that has been in the house in boxes or rubbermaid containers will dry out considerably faster in a warm ventilated space. If you have a good axe or splitting maul, splitting the larger splits and rounds in half will accelerate their drying. I would not try using the oven to do this. If you can set up the wood as stacks with a fan blowing through them it will be fairly effective and safer.

    Here's another thread with some good tips on drying wood:
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/uh-oh-wood-is-wetter-than-i-thought-advice.81238/
  7. Dave A.

    Dave A. Minister of Fire

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    300F sounds a little high to me. I'd try somewhere between 200 and 250 for an hour or so.
  8. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    If you go to Walmart, buy a few of their larges storage totes, and fill them with wood inside the stove room, they will dry well. You may have to watch for insects or not coming from the wood.
    Reload each tote as it is emptied and you will have a revolving supply of dry wood.
    I loaded 5 large totes in 2010 when I had a hernia op and was not very mobile.Worked very well.
  9. tsquini

    tsquini Minister of Fire

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    Instead of baking logs why not just bake bread. Bread bakes at 400* and at the end you have something to eat.

    If I were to bake logs I would defiantly bast it every 30 min. Until the internal core temperature hit 180* . Then let I'd sit for 30 min before you split it against the grain. Then let it burn.
  10. My Oslo heats my home

    My Oslo heats my home Minister of Fire

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    As others have said, try trading for dry wood. There might be someone that is will to help you out.
    Pallets are another options, as well as bio bricks.
    Mixed options, putting in dried wood with a portion of unseasoned.
    And I like Hog's idea, I have done it too in a pinch. Place unseasoned wood near your stove and
    it will help dry it a bit more before burning.
  11. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    I had pretty good luck a couple years ago, stacking wood that was split small in the house with a fan blowing on it. Took it from 25% to 20% in two weeks. If your stove is a non-cat, you might be able to go ahead and burn 25% wood and still get some heat off it....
  12. Big Dan

    Big Dan New Member

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    I would soak your wood in gas. remember to get the high-octane because the longer burn time.
  13. dmmoss51

    dmmoss51 Feeling the Heat

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    I think if your goal is to have a nice little fire for ombiance during the holidays and you're just talking about a few splits drying wood this way will get you what you need.

    However, as pointed out before, for home heating purposes the quantities of wood needed would make this very inefficient.
  14. Tenn Dave

    Tenn Dave Feeling the Heat

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    Make sure you season the wood liberally with plenty of salt and pepper. Another southern favorite is to deep fry it.
  15. dmmoss51

    dmmoss51 Feeling the Heat

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    The problem is your wood needs to be completely dry before putting it in the oil or else there could be a dangerous boilover which can cause a fire. Only use your turkey frier to dry wood outside in a well ventilated area :p
    Big Dan likes this.
  16. Tenn Dave

    Tenn Dave Feeling the Heat

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    point well taken..........
  17. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    and with that note, Good night, Gracie.
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