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Q&A DURA VENT STOVE PIPE

Post in 'Questions and Answers' started by QandA, Dec 2, 2007.

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  1. QandA

    QandA New Member Staff Member

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    Question:

    I AM HAVING DIFFICULTY FROM THE MANUFACTURERS OF DURA VENT STOVE PIPE WHEN I ASK THEM HOW HOT THE OUTSIDE OF THEIR PIPE MIGHT GET DURING A CHIMNEY FIRE. WHILE BURNING A FAIRLY HOT FIRE, I HAVE TAKEN READINGS OF OVER 200 DEGREES F AS THE CHIMNEY GOES UP THROUGH THE HOUSE (I HAVEN'T ENCLOSED IT YET) I WAS UNDER THE IMPRESSION THAT THIS TYPE OF TRIPLE WALL PIPE STAYED RELATIVELY COOL TO THE TOUCH. WAS I WRONG? I JUST WANT TO MAKE SURE IT IS SAFE FOR MY NEW HOME DURING THE WORST CASE SCENARIO OF A 2000 DEGREE F CHIMNEY FIRE. CAN YOU DIRECT ME TO SOME ADDITIONAL RESOURCES/SPECIFICATIONS ON THIS TYPE OF PIPE? THANKS



    Answer:

    A good question! A short discussion of temperatures in in order. Let's start at the bottom"
    1. Water will burn your hand at about 120 degrees F. Metal much hotter than this will also burn you if you hold your hand on it.
    2. Hot water pipes for heating (radiators) regularly hit 200 degree F...yet they go right through wood floors and other combustibles without any problems.
    3. Steam heating causes pipes to hit over 212 degrees...these also go through combustibles, yet would be MUCH too hot to touch.
    4. The lowest POSSIBLE temperatures where wood could ignite are in the 300 degree range. Even at this point, it would take prolonged heating and the wood would char long before it ignited.
    The outside of insulated chimney can probably hit temperatures of 500 degrees or hotter...still, the temperatures on the wood 2" away would remain very low. Supports for insulated chimney are designed so that air circulates in this 2", so it would be very difficult for a properly installed chimney to ignite materials in the walls or ceiling.

    So, to summarize..yes, you were wrong...it does get hot to the touch. Still, it's well within safe bounds.

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