Early Pacific Energy?

Willhound Posted By Willhound, Jan 13, 2006 at 12:50 AM

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Willhound

    Willhound
    Feeling the Heat

    Nov 20, 2005
    440
    0
    Loc:
    Northern Ontario, Canada
    I posted this link over in "The Gear" as part of the thread that Wahoowad started regarding pics of handmade fire tools.

    After looking at the picture for a minute, I realized that the stove shown looks a lot like an early version of a P.E. product, maybe ??
    Looking at the arch of the door, the ash shelf and the door catch, it looks a lot like my Summit....but the legs are a little cobby looking, and I don't see the trademark sliding draft control under the ash lip, so I'm not sure.

    Pic is here: http://www.woodheat.org/tips/ashfetish.htm

    Anybody?
     
  2. Rodney

    Rodney
    New Member

    Nov 25, 2005
    13
    0
    This is actually a modified cook stove built around a pacific energy. A gentleman by the name of John Gulland built it. This is the link to his website in regards to this stove:

    http://www.gulland.ca/homenergy/stove.htm

    interesting project
     
  3. Willhound

    Willhound
    Feeling the Heat

    Nov 20, 2005
    440
    0
    Loc:
    Northern Ontario, Canada
    Thanks Grandprix

    Wow! That is quite the project. So I was correct regarding the Pacific Energy, and I can see in the webpage shots that the damper slide is there. I can also understand the leg set-up now.
    This is quite a contraption. Brings back fond memories of Grandma's house that had one of the old style wood cookstoves with the side firebox, built in oven and water tank on the side that you pulled the little spigot down and hot water came out. You could either front load the fire box or top load by removing a lid or the entire top could be lifted for larger wood, or for ash cleaning. Over top of the unit was a closed storage/warmer space, with a little drawer that pulled out to keep toast warm. Eventually the water tank rusted out and was no longer used, but the firebox was good. When they went electric in the late 70's (!) we ended up with it in a cottage property we had that my parents sold about 10 years ago, and as far as I know, the new owner still uses it on special occassions, but mostly as a conversation piece. Anyway, I digress.

    This unit is very interesting. I know that there are different opinions regarding heating coils and wood stoves, but the latest incarnation with a seperate water tank looks like it can work, without the danger of overfiring and steam/pressure creation. I agree with Mr. Gulland, I'd love to see this go into production.
    When I get more time today I'm going to check out the rest of his website. Looks interesting.

    Willhound
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page