Econoburn's outdoor version, Fact or Fiction ?

trehugr Posted By trehugr, Feb 28, 2008 at 3:17 AM

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. trehugr

    trehugr
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 16, 2007
    234
    0
    Loc:
    Greenwood, Maine
    I've been waiting patiently to see Econoburn's outdoor gasifier. They said it would be available 01-2008. Has anyone heard anything new?
     
  2. trehugr

    trehugr
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 16, 2007
    234
    0
    Loc:
    Greenwood, Maine
    Now the website says March. Doesn't matter anyhow, its going to be July before all this snow melts. I cant even see my truck in the driveway.
     
  3. heaterman

    heaterman
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 16, 2007
    3,355
    622
    Loc:
    Falmouth, Michigan
    As I recall from a conversation with the VP of sales at Econoburn, they have the ASME folks coming in to inspect and certify their product line right about now. I would guess that they are waiting for that certification before they bring anything else on the market. In a lot of states ASME rating as a true pressure vessel is not a big thing. No inspections required, no insurance issues etc., but here in Michigan it's not legal to install a non-rated pressurized system of any type for heating purposes. You'll see the outdoor version very shortly along with the ASME rating. My guess is that this will become an issue with all pressurized boiler manufacturers in the near future.
     
  4. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson
    Mod Emeritus 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 18, 2005
    5,875
    147
    Loc:
    Central NYS
    So it's illegal to hook up an EKO in Michigan?
     
  5. mtfallsmikey

    mtfallsmikey
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 27, 2007
    149
    0
    Loc:
    Mt. Falls Va.
    Technically yes...(if there is not an ASME stamp) any "pressurized" heating vessel must have ASME certs, as well as UL. That is in any mech. code nationwide. I personally would not own any pressurized boiler without it!
     
  6. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson
    Mod Emeritus 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 18, 2005
    5,875
    147
    Loc:
    Central NYS
    It's fact. They have a prototype with a movable cover designed to work where a conventional OWB would otherwise be sited. It's awaiting certification and increased market demand. Presumably the latter will become apparent once the new regs on OWB emissions are implemented in several Northeast states.
     
  7. slowzuki

    slowzuki
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 1, 2007
    507
    9
    Loc:
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Re pressure vessel registrations, just because it doesn't have an asme stamp doesn't mean there is a problem with it. It is certainly nice and is easily absorbed in the price of units with high production.

    Open / non-pressurized devices get around this requirement.

    There are some open areas based on service temperatures, fluids, operating pressure, size of vessel etc. For example, we don't have ASME stamped taps for our hotwater despite being pressurized. I'm not sure but in Canada there are some slightly different requirements, we are going through this with some sprinkler systems in a power plant right now. We used the B31 code series here.
     
  8. heaterman

    heaterman
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 16, 2007
    3,355
    622
    Loc:
    Falmouth, Michigan
    "So it’s illegal to hook up an EKO in Michigan?"

    That's a fact. It's illegal for any person who does not hold a boiler license to install a pressurized system even if it's for your own residence.

    Now.....the fact of the matter is that it's obviously done all the time. Dave at Cozy sells more than a few EKO's around the state. A code official cannot come into your home without being asked if there is no permit pulled.

    Every water heater that's sold by HD Lowe's or the corner hardware store is also supposed to be permitted and inspected. Like that ever happens!

    About all the codes do is penalize the contractors trying to do it right by raising their cost of doing business.
     
  9. BrownianHeatingTech

    BrownianHeatingTech
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 5, 2007
    1,253
    0
    Loc:
    Northwood, NH
    Seconded...

    I see higher quality work here in NH than in Maine. NH has no licensing of oil or solid fuel heating technicians. Maine has both. All that means is that Maine has more-expensive cost for similar work due to the protection racket the state runs for "licensed" techs, and cheap fly-by-night techs who may kill you with shoddy work.

    Here, you actually have to know what you're doing in order to compete. If you don't, you lose customers really fast. About the only shoddy work I see is from big companies that can afford to lose customers (and who would be the first to get licensed, if such a thing were adopted).

    Okay, off the soapbox, now.

    Joe
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page