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EKO 60 Nozzle Replacement?

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by Eric Johnson, Dec 1, 2012.

  1. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    My rig is 6 years old, so I'm wondering if I should start thinking about replacing the nozzles. Anyone done that yet? If so, here are my questions:

    What do the nozzles cost?
    Do you get them from Zenon?
    Hard to replace?
    What symptoms would indicate they need to be replaced?

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  2. Fred61

    Fred61 Minister of Fire

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    You must be seeing quite a bit of wear after 6 years. After 4 years and only burning three to five hours a day I think I am seeing alot of wear. I talked to Zenon about the possibility of replacing it. I'm sure you've spoken with him before so you can put your own accent on it: ("You do not need new nozzle ---- call me back in twenty year!")
    However, I think it should be replaced but I don't know if he will sell me one.
  3. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I put about 10 full cords a year through it and I also periodically stick a poker up into the nozzles to clear them. But the thing seems to run OK. My only observation would be that I don't seem to get the vigorous gasification that I used to, but it hasn't been very cold this year (or last), and that's when mine tends to roar. Could also be that it needs a thorough cleaning to improve draft.

    Just curious more than anything. I think New Horizon's Q&A section said they only cost something like $50 each, so replacing them every couple of years would seem to be part of routine maintenance more than anything else.

    Yes, I met Zenon at a trade show once. Very nice guy. Very persuasive salesman. My guess is that if he thinks you don't need a new nozzle, you ain't getting one.
  4. mr.fixit

    mr.fixit Member

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    This thread shows what I did to extend the life of the nozzle in the EKO 40 http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/oak-nozzle-erosion-on-eko-40.72151/

    That repair lasted for all of last years heating season fine.

    The beginning of this season I replaced just the bricks that formed the nozzle.The original nozzle under the firebrick overlay looked unchanged from the year before.

    As far as performance,I believe with nozzle the correct size or slightly narrower,performance is equal or even slightly better than new.

    As the nozzle wears,it becomes wider and allows larger coals to fall through.

    Seems like it's easier to get and maintain gasification at lower fan speeds with the nozzle the correct size.

    Also some here have successfully repaired the nozzle opening with refractory cement but I haven't heard how that's holding up.

    I noticed that the original nozzle was cast in place when I first got the boiler,now I wish I would of put the overlay in when the boiler was new.

    Just a few things to think about before you try to replace the whole nozzle.
    It looks like a job and a half.
  5. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Very nice thread, mr.fixit. Very creative approach. I'll probably give that a shot because it's such an easy fix.

    When I first got my boiler, I experimented with putting a piece of firebrick over one of the nozzles (the 60 has two) for shoulder season runs. It worked pretty well.
  6. Fred61

    Fred61 Minister of Fire

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    Here's another discission on nozzle repair.
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/nozzle-repaire.84968/
    I thought I posted a photo but my search didn't locate it. I cut a slot in a half brick and layed it over the worn nozzle. I experimented with different slot widths (narrower) but ended up using a slot about the same as original.
  7. flyingcow

    flyingcow Minister of Fire

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    I just ordered a new nozzle for my Innova. I seem to have the same thoughts on good gassification, nozzle is definitely wider than a new one. I figured I'll need one eventually, get a new one here and try it in the next few months. Save the old one if i think it still has life. It won't be cheaper to buy one in a few yrs, won't hurt to have one on hand.
  8. Donl

    Donl Feeling the Heat

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    If you had to replace the nozzle on an EKO how would you go about removing the existing one? Where could you obtain a new one?
  9. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    New Horizon sells them, I'm sure. As to how to get the old ones out, I assume they just drop into the refractory mass, but I could be wrong about that. I know that to remove the entire refractrory, you have to grind the tubes free and pull them out. That's a big job, I bet. Hopefully the nozzles aren't.
  10. Donl

    Donl Feeling the Heat

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    Here is a picture of an EKO nozzle when it was new. To get it out would you push it up or push it down?

    Attached Files:

  11. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Looks to me like it just lifts out of there, Don. Drop the new one in. That's how I'd design it, anyway.

    It never occurred to me that allowing bigger coals to drop down through a worn nozzle is a bad idea from an efficiency point of view. I like the idea of artificially restricting the nozzle size with fire bricks laid on top, but I think replacing the nozzle(s) is obviously better if it can be done without too much trouble.

    Mark at AHONA might have some old ones in stock.
  12. Fred61

    Fred61 Minister of Fire

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    I was going to mention that. Chances are he will also know what it takes to remove and replace them.
  13. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I should call him. He's just down the road from me. We're not on the best of terms, but that shouldn't get in the way of a commercial transaction.

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