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Encore 2550 rebuild... start to finish

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by jharkin, Aug 11, 2013.

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  1. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    3,329
    Loc:
    Holliston, MA USA
    Final Thoughts - Part I

    Ok, so I'll add some final thoughts about the rebuild process and we can keep this here as a reference for other Vermont Castings owners.

    Is this worth doing?
    That all depends. For me I felt it was worth it because I inherited the stove with the house, Im handy enough to do all the work myself and the hearth is small and would be challenging to find another stove that fit well. I also only use the stove part time and the castings overall were in pretty good condition to re-use.

    If you rely on the stove 24/7, if you have to hire the work out, if you have significantly warped iron, its probably not worth it.

    What should I replace? How far to take the stove apart?
    This is a tough one. It is often recommended that if you are doing this much work you should tear the stove apart completely and rebuild it like new. That's a daunting task I didn't have time for. Nor the rebuild manuals to be sure I did it right. If you are going to do the refractory though at a minimum you have to take apart all the internal castings and fireback. If any part of the fireback is warped you might as well buy the entire fireback kit, otherwise just replace any parts that are not re-usable.

    Note that if you see signs that there are leaks in the outer shell (difficulty controlling a low burn in spite of good gasket seals, smoke test shows air being sucked in through panel seam, etc) than a full tear down rebuild is a must.

    How long and how much?
    I spread the work out over a couple months. Mostly working a half hour here or an hour there in evenings and on weekends, around work, kids and travel commitments. If you know what you are doing and work straight though I feel it could be a (long) weekend project.

    My total spend was a bit over $400 including a pro-rated warranty catalyst, refractory box, gasket kit, adhesives, hardware and misc supplies. I had all the tools.

    Where to get the parts?
    Your local dealer, or.....
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2013

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  2. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    3,329
    Loc:
    Holliston, MA USA
    Final Thoughts - Part II

    What about guides or manuals?

    So far I cant find the service manual for the 2550, and from what Ive been told VC wont give it out (they want dealers to do the service).
    I do have the following docs which should help:

    • The instructions for the 2550 Fireback kit install. Note that it says nothing about cementing or gasketing the upper back- refer to Defiants suggestions earlier in thread.
    • The manual for the VC gasket kit which should asnwer any gasketing questions and also has advice about aligning the door air manifolds, etc.
    • The service manual for the earlier 2140 revision of the stove. The fireback catalyst acess, door glass are all different but otherwise its a good read and provides helpful insight into things like cementing panels and how to properly adjust the thermostat.

    Attached Files:

  3. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    3,329
    Loc:
    Holliston, MA USA
    Final Thoughts - Part III

    What tools and supplies do I need?

    At a minimum:
    • Shop vac
    • Straight and Phillips Screwdrivers
    • Socket set
    • Allen key set
    • Couple size cold chisels and a hammer
    • wire brush
    • Gaskets, Gasket adhesive, furnace cement, stove paint if applicable.

    I strongly recommend:
    • A Dremel rotary tool
    • Dremel grinding bits - the #952 bits are perfect for cleaning gasket channel
    • Dremel cutoff wheel (to cut new screwdriver slots in creosote encrusted window glass screws and cutting oversize bolts to length)
    • PB Blaster or liquid wrench
    • Rubber mallet (for pressing castings back in and settings the fireback wedges)
    • Copper Anti-Sieze
    • 1/4-20 and 10-24 taps and tap handle
    • Replacement hardware (1/4-20 x 1" and 1/5" bolts, 10-24 button head screws x 1/4" & 1" for glass) - plain steel or stainless. no zinc!

    To really make things easy:
    • Drill or angle grinder with a couple size wire brushes
    • Electric impact driver to break stuck bolts
    • Graphite spray for the hinges, etc
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2013
  4. Reckless

    Reckless Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Messages:
    269
    Loc:
    Orange county, NY
    Like I said I didn't get ANY smell or smoke with the rutland, seems you have had the same fortune :)
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