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Englander 30 Overfire?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by fran35, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. fran35

    fran35 Member

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    I have an Englander 30 and I fear I may have overfired it. The paint around the collar looks a bit faded, almost rubbed away. I have never noticed the stove even remotely glowing, but my stovetop thermometer has been pegged at 800 before. This is my second year burning with the stove and I never had issues with the stove temps last year burning less than ideal wood(imagine that). Anyway, I have 30 feet of exterior Class A and my draft is a little extreme. Based upon some other members recommendations(thanks Pen) I installed the forbidden key damper last week. This has helped control the craziness but I noticed the paint around the collar missing at that time. I did a visual inspection at that time and it appeared superficial, but the bottom 12 inches of the black stove pipe is a bit lighter than the rest of the pipe--but still black. I have been burning for a week or two since that time and all seems good. I have a better grasp of my draft now with the damper and think it is under control. However, is the paint that is faded/gone a reason to shut it down and call someone?

    Anyway, forgive a newbie--I am learning as I go with this and hope I have this thing under control.

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  2. neumsky

    neumsky Minister of Fire

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    Semper Fi !!!!
  3. ozzy73

    ozzy73 Member

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    Fran we have all sinned, looked the gates of hell "2ndary burn tubes" and pegged the stove top thermometer at one time or another. :)

    Good to hear that the damper get things under control.
  4. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Paint faded means you certainly did get it hot. So long as the stove is controllable now you shouldn't have caused any damage. Perhaps repaint at the end of the season if this area is visible for your installation.

    No need to call anyone unless you see something warped or the stove is operating strangely. I think that key damper is going to be a big help to you. May take a while to get in the habit of opening it up before opening the door, but other than that, you should be just fine.

    pen
  5. HotCoals

    HotCoals Minister of Fire

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    With the key damper it is my belief that since it slows the hot air down that is going up the flue ..your pipe will get hotter below the damper.
    Actually it will also get a little hotter just above the damper before it does below..pipe heating up from hot air going slower up flue is my take.
  6. greythorn3

    greythorn3 Minister of Fire

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    heck we hit 800-850 most the time after a reload on our nc30 but our imperial thermotoer on the stove top reads abotu 100f to high, they are pretty junky, i got 3 of them and they all read high. its the one from lowes.

    the rutland we have is allot closer!

    Semper FI. USMC 1371
  7. neumsky

    neumsky Minister of Fire

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    Not owning a stove yet just wondering if the air shoulda been shut down on the leeward side???
  8. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    My thoughts exactly, when my stove top gets over 700 its time to start the blower of some other fan forced air and turn the air down a bit.
  9. neumsky

    neumsky Minister of Fire

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    This seems to be the general consensus??? Is this what they say in all the manuals?
  10. neumsky

    neumsky Minister of Fire

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    @ Greythorn... I was a 1371 combat engineer in 1973 thru 1977! Uuuuurah!
  11. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef Minister of Fire

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    If there is a change in color than it certainly got hot. From what you have mentioned, I would not get too worried about it. Those stove pipes can take a bit of abuse, just don't overdo it.

    On another note, I have a double wall pipe. It costs more but I believe it's a stainless steel inner liner.

    On my stove, I could often hit 800-850 (stove top temp) on a reload if I don't turn on the blower. With the blower, I can keep it at 700. I need to get the box nice and hot in order to get the secondaries going. I have never seen my stove glow nor has it changed color.

    Hope this helps!

    Andrew
  12. SmokeyCity

    SmokeyCity Feeling the Heat

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    I am the patron saint of over firing and I absolve you.

    Go and singe no more.
  13. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    LOL :lol: Good one Smokey!
  14. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    OK, here is the deal. That stove was designed for a 15 foot straight pipe. Take a piece of material of your choice, magnet, aluminum tape, whatever and block one half of that secondary burn inlet hole just behind the primary air intake and in front of the heat shield. And make a stove like they designed it to be. Block it in the middle so air can go in both sides of it. And toss that creosote collecting key damper on the scrap heap.

    No more blast to the moon overfires.

    http://www.gulland.ca/florida_bungalow_syndrome.htm
  15. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    Very interesting!!!! This explains why my 30 works relatively well connected to a 12x12 chimney. Although the chimney is way too big its also about 25Ft tall.
  16. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    The issue you have is how long it takes to heat that big tile hole up and what it takes to maintain that draft after it is heated. And what collects on the walls of it during the whole process. Be much better off with it lined.
    Snotrocket likes this.
  17. fran35

    fran35 Member

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    Thanks for all the responses, gents.

    BB, are you referencing the secondary intake that is perfectly round and approximately large enough for a pepsi can--at the rear and bottom of the stove?

    Also, if the stove is going Chernobyl on me, does turning on the blower truly help heat it down quick, or is it just the stove top? Along those same lines, I have just started using the blower this year. I really didn't care for it much last year, as I felt that it cooled the box down too much and impeded the secondaries. If I am using the blower, should I open the primary air a bit more to keep the box up to 500 or so?

    Thanks
  18. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    The secondary intake is a open rectangular hole in the bottom of the stove directly behind the round primary air inlet.

    After the firebox is up to temp the blower doesn't have a large effect as far as I can tell on the internal temp. But I wouldn't ever run it until the stove is up to temp and settled in for the burn. It slows down the process of getting the stove up to temp.
  19. PLAYS WITH FIRE

    PLAYS WITH FIRE Minister of Fire

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    Not hijacking but the secondary intake is in the back behind the heat shield correct? I guess by the blower?
  20. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    No. On the 30 it is a hole in the BOTTOM of the stove in the center back.
  21. PLAYS WITH FIRE

    PLAYS WITH FIRE Minister of Fire

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    That's what I was saying I think...
  22. greythorn3

    greythorn3 Minister of Fire

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    semper fi supergrunt! 89-97
  23. mywaynow

    mywaynow Minister of Fire

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    Is the foil tape referred to the same stuff you use on insulation sheets? I believe it is also used as duct tape?
  24. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I use the Nashua aluminum tape from HD for most stuff including the joints on pellet pipe.
  25. mywaynow

    mywaynow Minister of Fire

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    Thanks BB. Can I get your opinion on what I plan to do for break in?

    Going to set the stove outside on the patio with a 6 ft piece of stove pipe connected (someone else's reco)

    Plan to burn 2-3 fires of 4-5 poplar kindling pieces, letting the fire burn down to mostly ash

    Run 1 fire with 2-3 smaller cherry splits and after it coals up, run a fire with ash/oak and try to maintain stove top temperatures from there.

    I plan to do this over 3-4 hours on Saturday. We are looking at 50 degress as a high then. Thinking I should try and maintain a 500 stove top on the last fire and then when it settles down run some poplar to spike it into the 650 range. Not having used any stove of this nature before, I am expecting to miss some of the benchmarks, but they are targets all the same. Main object is to cure the paint so the stink stays outside and keeps the lady of the house happy.

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