Englander 30nc secondary air location

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by dies9, Feb 17, 2013.

  1. dies9

    dies9
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    Ive had my stove for 3 years and cant say enough good about it. However the last three fires i have had have been weak. Same wood i have been burning. It seems like the secondary air is block some how. Can someone tell me exactly where the stove gets its secondary air from. And is it possible to be blocked in anyway. Thanks guys/gals
     
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  2. EatenByLimestone

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    When this happens to me I generally clean the ashes away from the front of the stove. I nearly pulled 6 gallons of ashes out last time this happened after a cold snap.

    Mat
     
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  3. chvymn99

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    Have you cleaned your flue pipe lately? Have you pulled your tubes and board down to clean?
     
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  4. pen

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    The secondary air enters the stove by a rectangular opening found above the large circular opening at the back of the stove.

    However, I agree with checking the chimney. A partially blocked cap will really turn a stove into a slug.

    pen
     
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  5. dies9

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    chimney and pipe was cleaned 2 weeks ago. boards and rails were cleaned also. It seemed to happen right after this warm snap we had in new england. im burning it down now to clean the firebox out.
     
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  6. BrotherBart

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    Warm weather will wreck chimney draft most every time. Most noticeable over 50 degrees.
     
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  7. blades

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    Pull your tubes and run a wire brush through them as well as the out side. The little orifaces due get plugged up eventually. Warm weather and poor draft go together as was stated before.
     
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  8. dies9

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    i understand warm weather kills draft. However its 15 degrees now. the stove seems different all of a sudden. Im going to give it a good cleaning.
     
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  9. StihlHead

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    Yah, anything over 45 deg F. here and I have a hard time starting a fire. The draft goes to crap.

    At 15 deg F and the draw should be terrific though. Check for creosote buildup on and just below the cap. I had a good buildup just below the cap after a cold snap here in January. The stove pipe was clear up to the top 3 inches, where a thin cone of creosote had formed choking the pipe down to about 2 inches just below the cap. It was weird, like a layer of a hornets nest. Thin as could be, one scrape with a screwdriver and it fell down into the firebox.
     

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