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Q&A Enough Air for Gas Logs ?

Post in 'Questions and Answers' started by QandA, Jan 1, 2005.

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  1. QandA

    QandA New Member Staff Member

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    Question:

    I have a question that I could not find an answer to in your database, but maybe I didn't look hard enough. I have a masonry fireplace upstairs and down. The upstairs one is called a Swedish fireplace, I'm told. It is in the middle of the house, not on an outside wall. It is open on the front and on one side. The fireplace in the basement is a standard one which is only open at the front. They both have raised hearths and share the same footings and masonry to the roof. When we bought this house, it was evident that they had used both fireplaces a lot. But the house was very drafty and we had window repairs made and new doors installed. The house is now too tight for these to operate. They start out fine, but then burn up all the combustion air and die out. I've decided to install gas logs in both of these. But before I do, I'd like to know where will I get the combustion air? Remember, neither of these is on an outside wall. And, it is not possible to run a horizontal pipe to the outside wall for air. Do I need outside air for these fireplaces? If so, can I get it by running a pipe up the chimney? I really don't know what to do.




    Answer:

    This is a tough one..since most houses have more than enough air to run at least one fireplace. One solution would be to install gas "inserts" instead of logs. The direct vent type have two pipes which go up the chimney..one brings air in, and the other brings the gas out. It is possible that your idea of running a flexible aluminum pipe down the chimney to feed the gas logs may work. You'll have to experiment with it. Make certain that you do not terminate the intake pipe too close to the top of the chimney.... or it may just suck the gas fumes back....maybe run it out a foot or two, or flex it down after it comes out the top...good luck

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