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Envi Blocks will void my stove warranty!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by isipwater, Jul 31, 2013.

  1. ridemgis

    ridemgis Burning Hunk

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    South Kingstown, Rhode Island
    Oh yeah!

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  2. bmwloco

    bmwloco Member

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    Jan 17, 2008
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    Loc:
    Asheville NC
    Up early - working nights make for interesting days off.

    Soon to button up my Vermont Resolute. We moved, and made special care to bring the old VC. She's been a stalwart stove. Sporting two Stirling Engine fans now too.

    Here in the garage, towering over the old1969 Moto Guzzi V7 is my cache of Envi-8 Logs. 50% 3 packs, 50% 6. 10 rows, 6 feet high.

    My truck stays clean now. My chainsaw idle. The wood splitter is in storage.

    Last winter in the "new" house (1928 brick with gas furnace) I just pushed the Resolute in position, fired her up, and she was drawing fine. No smoke. Nothing but Envi Logs.

    Amazing consistent burn time; 1 hour 350F; 1:45 600F - and it was stay at 600F for 8 hours; in the mornings, I could place in a couple more Envi Logs and keep a hot box night to night.

    And ash? Phht. I only had to shovel it out monthly. It was fine, very light ash too.

    So, sitting here in late July, I'm ready. Bring on winter.
  3. prezes13

    prezes13 Member

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    Towards the end of the heating season I used exclusively eco bricks in my lopi cape cod. I usually used 8-10 bricks at a time. Most of the time I would start with a cold stove and have only one fire a day. I didn't pack the stove tight and I didn't over fire the stove but once I had it going nice I had the air shut all the way for most of the time. I was getting long burns 8+ hours. Once even close to 13. I would use them all the time but they are too expensive in my opinion. I think it's easier to over fire stove with fuel bricks but if are cautious they great alternative to cord wood especially if it is wet.
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2014
  4. prezes13

    prezes13 Member

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    Also funny thing is that my dealer also sells fuel bricks. Either hot bricks or bio bricks, he also burns them in his show room stoves. That includes travis industry stoves.
  5. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    My only source that isn't outrageously priced is a hundred miles away.

    Trees are thirty feet from the house on all sides. Five and a half acres of them.
    clemsonfor likes this.
  6. prezes13

    prezes13 Member

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    There is a place in my town that sells ton of Eco bricks for $265 I think that it's a lot compared to $3.26 a gallon of oil right now. I get my wood free so I am a but biased.
  7. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    Ecobricks are still cheaper. 1 ton Ecobricks are 20 million BTU (essentially 1 cord of wood) = $13.25 per mBTU. At $3.26 per gallon you are paying $23.30 per mBTU for oil.
    clemsonfor likes this.
  8. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    At $265 my old self would be laying them in and letting the saws rest.
  9. prezes13

    prezes13 Member

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    I totally agree with you, the way I used to calculate was that 100 gal of oil = a cord of wood. It's just there is much less work with oil and I can turn the thermostat up or down whenever I want. I just think that bricks are bit pricey overall to burn them exclusively. But all that said I will get a ton of them to supplement some of my free wood.
  10. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    I was thinking almost the same. Should I ever not be able to process my own wood I don't think I would bother with buying split wood but go directly to burning the bricks. No stacking at least 2 times, less mess, no bugs, less ashes, less creosote, no need to go outside in the cold... Maybe I should switch right now?! :oops:
    clemsonfor likes this.
  11. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    Gallon oil is 140,000 BTU so it's more 150 gallon oil = 1 cord (21 mBTU). Given the amount of money that goes into chainsaw(s) + gear, splitter, woodshed, gas etc. the bricks are not THAT pricey actually.
  12. prezes13

    prezes13 Member

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    Really? Nothing beats burning real wood. But yes it is a big convenience, going price of a cord of wood here in ct is $200, split, delivered, not seasoned, so for extra $65 you are getting a premium "wood", looking at them from this perspective maybe bricks are not that pricey after all. And those stove manufacturers don't want us to burn them.
  13. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    I never used them but I doubt that you will see much of a difference when burned in a stove. Secondary flames plus heat is all I need.
    Our price around here is similar. That's the reason I would rather buy the bricks than split firewood. The added convenience and less work will make the premium absolutely worthwhile.
    Certainly not all of them. Osburn (SBI) for example mentions them as permissible fuel in their manuals (at least the few ones I have looked over).
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2014
  14. blades

    blades Minister of Fire

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    With good hard wood split cord at $300 per around here( ya know it's green and best be able to identify what they are selling as most seem to consider any thing that isn't a conifer, good hardwood ) the blocks represent a much better deal. One guy quoted 200 a log cord picked up. With pricing in that area might just as well turn on the NG furnace. About the only thing I save on would a gym membership.
  15. prezes13

    prezes13 Member

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    You are getting secondary flames and all that it's just a different look of the bricks, especially in the coal stage. Once you try them you will see. Wow I was thinking that we pay high prices for wood, oil, gas etc. but some of you guys pay really high prices.
  16. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    They are charging that for softwood locally. :mad:
  17. NewStoveGuy

    NewStoveGuy New Member

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    Just stunned at some of the pricing out there. Around here in the Upper South it's $100 - $180 per split, delivered, unseasoned to 6 month seasoned cord of good hardwood. There are guys who charge more, but they're generally buying wholesale and reselling to those who don't take the time to fire up CL and shop around.

    Still looking to lay up a ton of woodbricks though...
    clemsonfor likes this.
  18. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    Greenwood county, SC
    Everything is cheaper in the south

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