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Ever seen a pto wood splitter like this ????

Post in 'The Gear' started by machinistbcb, Oct 9, 2008.

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  1. machinistbcb

    machinistbcb New Member

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    I found this splitter for sale. It hooks up to a 3 pt. hitch and runs off a P.T.O. that drives a wedge on a jack-shaft back and fourth. Ever seen or used one like this ?? I have an electric splitter simular to this but I have never seen one that runs off a pto. The seller doesn't have a tractor to hook it up to, so I can't see it run. I wonder what it has for power.

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  2. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    I suppose it would depend on the thread pitch of the jack shaft. (assuming that is how it's moved back and forth) If you know the shaft diameter, thread pitch, and the torque your engine/motor would apply (taking into account any torque multiplications through gear reduction) you could probably punch that data in a calculator, such as http://www.turula.com/bolt.html. Set the level of detail for the calculations to 'high' then see what it spits out for the 'axial stress' of the bolt. That should also be the force going into your log. You could also work out the cycle time based on the input rpm and thread pitch.
  3. kevin j

    kevin j Minister of Fire

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    dual lead screw that reverses at end of stroke, or some sort of crank shaft/pitman like a sickle mower?
    Just guessing from the mechanical principles, but the acme revesring screw would likely be slow but have lots of power. a crank shaft would be fast but use impact, like a super splitter, instead of sheer force.

    I'd pass because:
    -the pic shows a tractor. was it his? why can't it demo then.... yellow flag. is somethin wrong
    -If pto powered and no way to stop it, no e stop bar or engine kill, I can see a big safety issue. That is the biggest red flag for me. too dangerous unless there was a deadman type control, or at least a kill.

    -if you have tractor, look for a hydr one. Usually slow, only 6-10 gpm at the rear outlets on older ones, but faster up to 20 gpm on newer tractors. Lots of power though, so same speed full stroke, no shifting down like a two stage pump does.

    k
  4. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    the power will come from the pto source
  5. slindo

    slindo Member

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    What bothers me is the loads it could be putting on the drive train, of the tractor especially, if it jams or can't split the log. Is there any kind of slipper clutch to handle this? Hydraulic systems tend to soften and dissipate the blow when this happens, and usually have overpressure reliefs valves to avoid straining the system. Are you on any of the tractor forums? They might be a good place to check it out, see if anyone has any info, or even a manual. Is there a name on it?

    Often with these old orphan gadgets, if it's the only one like it you have ever seen, and the company is out of business, and everyone else seems to make them the same, other, way... there's a reason!

    That said, it's pretty cool, and I want it!
  6. woodconvert

    woodconvert Minister of Fire

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    The ACME drive screw would be the weak link me thinks. Older tractors i've dealt with didn't clutch the PTO but did have shear pins in case of overload and something didn't give.
  7. polaris

    polaris Feeling the Heat

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    If it is PTO driven it is completely separate from the hydraulic system. I would think almost any real tractor would have power to spare @ the PTO. For example my small compact tractor has 48 hp at the flywheel and 44 at the pto. If 44 diesel hp wouldn't operate a log splitter there is a problem. All pto driven equipment will have a sheer pin(usually just a non hardened bolt) or if a newer pricier unit, maybe a slip clutch. I may have missed it but where is this located. I would really like to have a tractor mounted splitter that's pto driven rather than the more common hydraulic driven units. They are also pricey when new.(more than a 20-30 ton self powered unit).
    Machinist, if this unit is real cheap and you decide you don't want it I would be intrested in trying to work something out with you. I.E. paying for the unit and paying you a finders fee and for your time and trouble. I do regular bus. with both roadrunner and DHL. I have a loading dock and pallet forks on a tractor and a bobcat. Just a thought.
    Joe
  8. machinistbcb

    machinistbcb New Member

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    I plan to look at it tomorrow. I think it is set-up with a belt drive somehow, see the blue leaver towards the front. The belt would slip if the wedge ever got jammed And yes I understand the power is coming from the PTO what I meant was if it has enough power to split big stuff. I have an old Ford 8n tractor that would have plenty of H.P. to run it.
  9. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    I have a thread here about my "unicorn" style pto log splitter that I run on my tractor. It is even more dangerous than this one and I have been able to stall the 30 HP diesel tractor with it and also have broken shear pins, the difference is that a sharp and sudden stoppage will bust a pin and a slow one will stall the engine. The belt drive is a built in overload limiter as the belt will slip.

    There ain't nothing small and compact about a 48 HP tractor. My 30 HP machine weighs 4500 lbs ready for work.

    If the device is only splitting or retracting while the lever is engaged then this could be a smart device. Farily safe. The screw drive system might not be as efficient but that's OK.

    An old Ford 8n is low on HP. I want to say they were in the teens. Lots of torque though. Also their rear exhaust would smoke you out if you worked back there too long.
  10. flyingcow

    flyingcow Minister of Fire

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    Keep in mind, if it doesn't come with the pto shaft to run it(between the tractor and splitter), those can be a little pricey. I had one made up for a 7ft mower. $350
  11. machinistbcb

    machinistbcb New Member

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    Yeah, I have one of those unicorn splitters too. Its in pretty rought shape though, bearings are all frooze up, point is dull and I need a shaft for it. I think my 8n has like 19 h.p. at the PTO but like you said it has lots of torque. There is a big difference between my 1948 23 H.P. motor and the cheapo's they sell today. I can see a pto shaft on this splitter in the pic.
  12. polaris

    polaris Feeling the Heat

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    It is by definition a "compact tractor". I think it all is in perspective. I have a tractor with duals front and rear and central pivot that puts out 325hp and 900+ ft. lbs. of tq. I also have an old Ford commander that is a fairly large tractor with a 6 cyl. inline diesel(non turbo) that only puts out 38 hp? An 8n is just under 20 hp. but in no way could you compare that 20hp to a 20 horse kohler/Briggs in a lawn tractor. Modern tractors have had a tendency to have a way higher power to size ratio. I have an old 9n that has even less power than the 8n. but it would still drag 3, 20 horse lawn tractors all over the place(due in part to the weight advantage).Remember people used to farm several 100 acres with nothing but an 8 or 9n. and a single bottom plow.
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