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External Air for Oil-Fired Boiler?

Post in 'The Green Room' started by velvetfoot, Jun 9, 2006.

  1. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    I think I will do this over the summer (factory kit).
    Currently boiler gets air from interior (basement).
    It is not fan forced or induced draft or whatever it's called (has a chimney - no plastic pipes).

    Is this indeed an energy-saver? Will there be operational issues?

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  2. Rhone

    Rhone Minister of Fire

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    Hmm... read this under Derating or replacing oil burners and read about the flame retention burner which will save you 20% of your fuel costs by blocking air from going out your chimney when not in use. It sounds like your kit is that and read this where it talks about specifying a unit with outside/sealed air combustion and how it saves energy pretty far down the page. It also warns about using them with unlined old chimney as their exhaust can be corrosive or something to that effect.

    Don't know if that's helpful but sounds like a wise choice if you can get the word it's compatible with your current chimney setup.
  3. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    outside air supply to a boiler/ burner is never a bad idea In fact a good idea if competing appliances are in the same area.
    Whether it is an energy saver yes and no If lacking or competing for combustion air complete combustion will be assured with
    the introduction of outside air. this will save money and improve effecienccy. However if totally satisfied with the inside air vollume then not much will be gained. How do you know if it is the effeciency test are taken when during short periods of run time and do not indicate its running situation on peak demand mathicical formulars are available to claculate you indoor air vollume to see it it is satisfied
  4. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Whoa, 2006 thread with Elky commenting. Good to hear it's working for you Don.
  6. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Thanks BeGreen

    People do not realize that the new oil burners with blowers that now fire before the oil lights up really blows alot of air!!

    The Air boot kit has 4" flex aluminum piping! That is alot of air moving, so using outside air really keeps the inside more comfortable!
  7. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    As the originator of this thread, thanks!
    Five summers later, I still haven't done it.
    Things seem to run okay now, the way it is, but...

    No problems with condensation (slug of water)?
    I've also read of people putting a "U" in it (I think that was Alaska), to keep the cold air at bay when not operating.
  8. steam man

    steam man Minister of Fire

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    I have used an outside air kit for years made by Field Controls for use with their power venter. One of the things to consider is that just using outside air for combustion doesn't necessarily mean big savings since you still are heating the air for combustion, hence you are using fuel. If you use inside air it is already heated. Savings? The Field Controls unit uses the exhaust gases to preheat the incoming air at least a little bit to recover lost heat out the stack. I would say more savings this way but not sure how much without doing a heat balance. My issue is that I would like to figure out how to do the same with the barometric damper since it sucks out room air when running. There are some oil guys who say a damper is not needed with a power venter although Field Controls recommends it. I am thinking I could readjust the fixed damper inside the unit to stop the barometric one from pulling so much. Anyone have experience with this?

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