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Favorite Species of wood to burn.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Greg123, Aug 23, 2006.

?

Favorite Species of wood to burn.

  1. Oak

    50.9%
  2. Ash

    10.5%
  3. Maple

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Elm

    5.3%
  5. Cherry

    10.5%
  6. Beech

    1.8%
  7. Birch

    21.1%
  8. Other

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
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  1. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Our Eastern Pines don't get over maybe ten to eighteen inches. They do all of their growing toward the sky. Up about seventy or eighty feet and then break off and land on your car or house. I did a frame up rebuild on a garden tractor of mine five years ago. Like a brand new machine. Pine tree snapped off and flattend the sucker like a pancake.

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  2. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    I voted OAK . That Hedge, Osage orange is a nice hot hard fire wood but a he(( of a lot of sparks come off of it . The best way to burn it is all night burn and let it be . If you burn it durning the day and reload your about 90% to get a face full of sparks . When i cut it and get in my wood pile i normally just burn it out in the shop . Them sparks are bad for the carpet in the house . 60% of what i have this year is ELM ...... just one of them years i guess .
  3. berlin

    berlin New Member

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    true ironwood is actually eastern hophornbeam, not osage or as i've always called it "hedge"
  4. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Oak or Apple, then Ash, Maple and Elm. Actually pine seems o.k. Burns good for a while puts out good heat, then poof it dissapears. I also like Hickory, but don't get much of it.
  5. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    I also burn almost exclusively pine, the pinon variety. It's density is somewhere in between the oaks and ponderosas which we have here, but probably a bit pitchier than the latter on average. Ponderosa makes the best kindling though; it's straight, large grain splits very controllably and neatly.

    There's a little oak around here too, but the price is about as ridiculous as it is up MSG's way.

    The thing I notice most about the difference between the way oak and pine burns, the pine produces much longer flames and predominantly yellow in color.
  6. brian_in_idaho

    brian_in_idaho New Member

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    I put other just due to what we have locally. Around here in order of preference its tamarack (western larch), red (douglas) fir, grand fir, lodgepole and ponderosa. Ponderosa=evil stuff. Soaks up water like a sponge, splits terribly, lots of ash. Tam is great stuff, splits like a dream. Red fir is a close second, and a lot more available right around my property.

    Bri
  7. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Ha ........ You said the "E" word there Warren . I didnt see that it wasnt voted on ............O' thats right "love to hate" was the wording for that wood .
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Locally madrona is the primo wood to get. Not on the list, so my vote is for 'other'.
  9. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    I only added Elm as being on my favorite list since:

    a: I burn a lot of it since every dead friggin tree around here is an elm
    b: It's not a bad burning wood.

    BUT:
    Elm sucks it's natures cruel joke. It's impossible to split and when it burns it leaves clinkers stuck to your fire brick that eventually destroy your firebrick. Litterally cause it to crumble. But it heats your house night after night for the price of a two firebricks per year...It's a good deal in my book.

    Plus by splitting that 5 cords of elm in the yard a peice of 30" white oak might as well be a peice of 12" ash as far as splitting effort goes.

    Yup...I sure love (to hate) elm. I'm thinking Roo is right up there with elm...He seems to love to poke me on this "issue I have" LOL :) :) :)
  10. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    Intresting "other" is as popular as "oak" what would you guess the btu's per lb are in "other"?
  11. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Whatever is in Pine would be my guess.
  12. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    LOL :) I would have to agree with your list . We get a lot of Elm around here . We also have a lot of OAK but i cut trees as there are needed to come out. Most of the time the ole Oak tree is fine with no problems , healthy and no big reason to be felled . Now Elm on the other hand is alway "falling apart" and has issues so the take down is needed. I would rather burn a tree that is needed to come out over a tree that is just fine as it be. I guess the big reasion i poke so much at you over ELM is because you take the words right out of my mouth . If some one says "ELM" you always seem to beat me to your famous lines over it . Also Warren you mentioned the Elm breaks up your fire brick ............. I for one havent run across this issue . In the past 15 years of burning wood i might of replaced 2 fire bricks total of all the stoves i have run .I know there are a few different types of Elm . Maybe you have a different type of Elm where you are located ?...?...?
  13. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    No idea if it's different. The Elm I'm burning is all cut from a a couple peoples yards. Some of it was big, some small. But it was all dead as a door nail. No bark on the standing tree. Some if it seemed to take a month or two to season, then it would burn well. The higher smaller limbs I would burn right away. It was the bigger splits that seemed to cause the problem more. I'm still searching for a good theory on this clinker thing. This happened only just in front of the air intake at the front of my stove. Most times I could just scrape it off and it was fine, but I guess when the stove was allowed to get full of ashes, I found this stuff completely bonded to the firebrick. When I poked at it to remove it the fire brick crumbled and left a divot in the firebrick. I tried cementing the peices back in place with refractory cement, but that didn't work. The other point to note here is the firebrick in the stove is, in my opinion, is a lousy quality firebrick. It looks like cinder blocks or those 6x12 patio blocks. It's very light. The stuff I got to replace the two in my stove looks just like the stuff in the pictures of Kevin's new Morso 7110. That stuff feels like a brick should. It's very dense, very heavy. I weighed the two bricks with a kitchen scale, and one is around twice the weight of the other. I'm hoping that this year, more well seasoned wood cut much earlier in the year plus the higher quality bricks will solve that problem and I'll just have to hate ELM a litte less.
  14. Greg123

    Greg123 New Member

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    Any body ever burn CottonWood, (I think it is also called Poplar or related to it some how) I just picked up some free stuff yesterday, it splits really easily but the inside smells like horse manure :sick: . I couldn’t imagine burning this stuff indoors; maybe the smell subsides once it is seasoned. My intentions where only to burn this stuff in my out door fire pit anyway.
  15. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    Cottonwood is not poplar... around here it's also called Chinese Elm but bears no resemblance to the elm that others here are so fond of... :)

    I have four big ones (30"+ diameter) lining the front of my yard... had five but lost one to drought and felled it last summer. You're right, it doesn't smell great but in a stove that's not an issue. I think it is essentially junk wood. Has about 75% the btu's of pine but leaves more coals, which eventually creates a problem. It makes ok kindling, and maybe you can mix one piece into a load of 3 or 4. Or you can burn it at the beginning and end of the season when you don't need full heat output. But I wouldn't go out of my way to get it. In fact someone drove up last week and offered me a pickup load of it cut and split for $20. As soon as I saw what it was, I passed...
  16. brian_in_idaho

    brian_in_idaho New Member

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    It's amazing how this happens with P-pine! Red fir or tamerack I can usually pop a 2 foot dia round with a couple wacks of the maul, its sweet stuff! Feels good to be able to do that, I haven't seen the need for a splitter, or a wedge unless there is a bad knot. P-pine is another story for me, I have had to work on little 10-12 inch pcs and didn't think they would ever pop. Seems like they are fussy on when to split, green they don't do well, but if they sit on the ground more than a few months they seem to soak up water, if the maul doesn't bounce off it sticks! Splitting at the end of a long, hot summer seems to work best for me. Around here P-pine grows pretty fast (we're at about 2700 ft), it probably isn't as hard and dense as what you have.

    Bri
  17. Greg123

    Greg123 New Member

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    Precaud – Thanks for the clarification between Poplar and CottonWood. With a smell that bad, I would agree that it is junk wood.
  18. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Cottonwood Ole Cotton Wood ........... Its A.O.K as a tree but when it comes to wood burning its not worth a P . ( i'm bad i know --------- HEY quit throwing stuff ) If i ever come across a cottonwood tree for a take down / removel I normally cut it up 24" and take it down to the lakes , camp sites , fishing holes , dam ect for any one that wants to burn it as camp fires and such . The boy scouts are often calling for fire wood to so i keep them in mind if i run across something . I just hate to take any wood ( except brush ) to the dump . I sure in the he(( am not going to use it my self in the wood stove and wouldn't sell it for such. I have seen cotton wood for sale for about $20. a truck load and the $$ is for a fee to get from point A to B is about what it amounts to .
  19. berlin

    berlin New Member

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    "Cottonwood is not poplar… around here it’s also called Chinese Elm but bears no resemblance to the elm that others here are so fond of"

    cottonwood IS poplar, more specifically poplar is a name given to the eastern cottonwood if i remember correctly "populus deltoides" hence poplar. while there is a chinese elm i've found what is commonly called chinese elm is a completely different species (it is actually "siberian elm) and if you saw the two side by side there is no way you could get them confused. i have burned much poplar it burns hot and very very clean, albeit quick.

    http://www.hort.uconn.edu/Plants/p/popdel/popdel1.html -poplar

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siberian_Elm -"chinese elm" or siberian elm

    and just for fun; eastern hophornbeam aka ironwood one of the absolute best burning trees imho- http://www.oplin.org/tree/fact pages/hophornbeam_eastern/hophornbeam_eastern.html
  20. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Hophornbeam (I giggle every time I say that for some reason) is one of many trees to go by the name of Iron wood. Since an earlier post by me stating that Osage can sometimes be called ironwood (old timers around my area), I did a little research (not much, mind you). Thought it to be somewhat interesting. From Wikipedia:
    Ironwood may refer to the following:

    Any particular wood that has a reputation for hardness. Usage of the name may (or may not) include the tree that yields this wood. Species involved include:
    Androstachys johnsonii — Lebombo ironwood
    Carpinus caroliniana — also known as American hornbeam
    Casuarina equisetifolia — Common Ironwood from Australia
    Choricarpia subargentea
    Copaifera spp.
    Eusideroxylon zwageri
    Guaiacum officinale and Guaiacum sanctum — Lignum vitae
    Hopea odorata
    Krugiodendron ferreum — Black Ironwood
    Lyonothamnus lyonii (L. floribundus) — Catalina Ironwood
    Mesua ferrea — also known as Rose Chestnut or Ceylon Ironwood, from Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia
    Olea spp. — various olive trees
    Olneya tesota — Desert Ironwood (of Subfamilay Faboideae, in Family Fabaceae)
    Ostrya virginiana — Hop hornbeam
    Parrotia persica — Persian Ironwood
    Tabebuia serratifolia — Ipe

    That is all. You may return to your regularly scheduled program. :)
  21. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    That list reads like the ingredients in alot of medications. As long as there is no anal leakage involved I'll take two.
  22. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    EEEEEWWWWWWW! :sick:
  23. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    Sorry I was just thinking of a commercial I saw the other day. I think it was for allergy medication or something. At any rate they listed of about 10 possible side effects and the last one being "anal leakage" whatever the hell that means. I thought to myself gee I can have a clear nose and leak from places one shouldn't leak or simply put up with a stuffy nose. Decision time. :)
  24. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

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    Some stuff should just not be advertised...anal leakage..is that like breaking wind or a full set of drawers? What is next?
  25. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    Another great one is "oily discharge". I love how they say it too it's all upbeat "this pill will stop one ailment but can cause headache, diahreah, abdominal cramping, bubonic plague, crop failure, and everyones favorites anal leakage & oily discharge or in some rare cases death" but hey you won't be depressed anymore.
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