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Fiskars Pro Splitter Disappoints

Post in 'The Gear' started by pulldownclaw, Aug 24, 2009.

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  1. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Every one of them have straight handles. You really should try a nice curved handle axe.

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  2. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

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    Curved handle ax? I guess I don't know what one is or what it's used for. For chopping on the other side of the tree or around corners? Picture please.

    I think every "hitting" type tool I have has a straight handle. Hammers, sledges, baseball bat, machete, horse whip; couldn't imagine hitting baseballs with a curved bat.
  3. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Ja, but why ridicule? A curved handle puts the centreline of force closer to the cutting edge making it more stable. Curved handles are common on felling axes for that very reason. I used 3 1/2 lb felling axes to split with most of my life. I've never used a straight handled axe ever and only tried using a straight handled maul once it my life. That was all it took to realize the engineer that designed it didn't know the value of a curved handle.

    http://www.stihlusa.com/handtools/PA100-Felling-Axe.html
    [​IMG]
  4. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

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    I have never seen anything like that. So the handle is in a straight line from end to head, but it's got kind of a sway, or dip, in the middle. Besides felling axes, do they make splitting mauls with the same type of handle? I was imagining a "curved handle" like the old scythes. Thanks for the picture.
  5. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    WTF?
  6. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

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    Ha ha! Yup, I thought the only Fiskars stuff I had was a pair of hedge shears and a fillet knife. Forgot about the ax. As the blade goes into the small piece of wood to make kindling, the edges of the wood hit the plastic part that's wrapped around the head and it sticks. I think if it had more of a flare on the head like the Fiskars splitter, or the plastic part was thinner, it would work better. If the plastic of the handle was inside the head, like the yellow-handled ax that I use, the wood could slide better. But I never bought it for me to use for kindling anyway, so I just put it away and forgot about it.
  7. southbound

    southbound Minister of Fire

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    My money is on the helko Vario 2300G Heavy Splitting Axe...

    I own both and like the helko much better...
  8. mn_jon

    mn_jon Member

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    I just ordered one for 46 bucks on amazon also. I got 30 bucks off for signing up for the amazon visa (which i'll promptly cancel afterwards). I guess for 16 bucks it's worth a shot. I'll post more when I get it. For now I am just piling up a huge mountain of rounds.




    jon
  9. Inwo

    Inwo New Member

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    After reading this and several similar threads I ordered up a Fiskar's 4.5lb splitting axe. After years (and years) of a sledge and wedges I gotta say this is night and day. I can blast wood apart faster than I had ever imagined. My only problem is since I'm working in the dirt I manage to land the thing halfway buried after every swing. It's caught a few rocks :( Still, it's the best investment I've ever made.
  10. kbrown

    kbrown Feeling the Heat

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    I could retire if I could get a commission from converting people over to the Fiskars. Yes, I will firmly say that you can't use it for every round, but can do at least 80% or more. The remaining ones I finish off with ole reliable 6#'r maul. I didn't read every post in this thread, but the thing to remember is it not just about going out there and thinking you are going to make the round explode with one hit; first you need to read the round and understand how to use the existing cracks and grain pattern to work with the tool you are using. I have nothing but good things to say about the Fiskars and have split some really knarly stuff with it and look forward to many years of satisfaction with it.

    Yes, I do now own a splitter, but until recently have done just about everything by hand and really enjoy it. I will still hand split and save the knotty stuff and similar stuff for the splitter. I would rather not use a wedge anymore after reading the posts of the injuries that have happened; even if they are taken care of properly. Why risk it.
  11. Nonprophet

    Nonprophet Minister of Fire

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    I too love the Fiskars Pro Splitter! Someone else in this thread said that the first 1/2 hour they used it they were just giggling--and I can relate!! This thing carves through anything I've thrown at it so far--including some 16" rounds of green Elm!!! I'm so impressed with how it went through that Elm that I fully intend to set up my video camera and shoot some footage, when I do I'll post it on Youtube so others can see how well this axe splits even tough wood like Elm. I've split 3 cords of mixed hardwood in the past 2 weeks and I haven't touched my 8# maul even once............

    NP
  12. CarbonNeutral

    CarbonNeutral Minister of Fire

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    I feel cheated - I only started splitting this year and I went straight for the Fiskars based on Amazon reviews. How can I feel the enjoyment I should when I haven't had 5 years of pounding away with a heavy maul?
  13. mn_jon

    mn_jon Member

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    well it is a very handy tool to have around. It does an excellent job with most of the rounds I split. It does however get stuck in really wet wood (no surprise here). I am amazed that everything splits easier and that the fiskars usually sticks in the stump I split on. This thing is REALLY SHARP, like everyone else says. I am really careful with this compared to the maul.




    Jon
  14. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, or 25.
  15. dougstove

    dougstove Member

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    Regarding double-bitted axes:
    My grandfather was an old time logger in his youth.
    He always used double-bitted axes. One edge would be ground thinly, with a smooth, gradual taper (slightly convex, I think, almost towards hollow ground). That side was very sharp, but relatively fragile, and was used for felling clear wood.
    The other side was ground thicker, with a blunter taper. The thicker side was used for rougher work like limbing (and I guess perhaps splitting), where there was more risk of knicking the blade on a knot.
    I think I recall hearing there are also physical advantages to a double bitted axe, because more of the mass of the axe is in line with the cutting blade.
    My dad still has some of them, in perfect shape; works of art.

    (Reminiscence: Grandfather was sinewy little guy with a grip like a vice until the day he died. Those old loggers burned 8000-12000 calories per day. They chose their logging operation largely on the quality and reputation of the cook; the cook had to be skillful to make it physically possible to eat enough to stay healthy. Mechanization is great, but imagine a job working outside in the cold woods all day with an apple pie for lunch...).
  16. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, or 40. I've been pounding away with a heavy maul for 40 years, same maul head for 30, and the same handle for 25. It's always worked well for me, one reason why I'm reluctant to change now. It seems kind of odd that anybody that does not know me and love me would be so concerned about making my work easier, thank you. But by lightening my wallet 40 bucks? Hey, wait a minute! Is this some kind of advertising scheme to promote a product that otherwise cannot sell itself?

    I will consider buying one, but not until I've tried one first, no matter how many advertising testimonials I see. Is there anybody close to Castle Rock Lake that owns one and would let me take a couple swings? I would greatly appreciate the opportunity to try a new type of splitting tool!
  17. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    It's $40. Buy one. Even if you hate it for splitting you still get a great little (or big, depending on which way you go) ax out of the deal. How many top shelf, lifetime guaranteed tools can you get for $40? Not many.

    And it will ease your splitting chores, assertions to the contrary notwithstanding.
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