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Fiskars X27

Post in 'The Gear' started by ironguy, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. ironguy

    ironguy New Member

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    Hi Everyone,

    I just received a Fiskars X27 from Amazon and took it out yesterday to try it out. I'm curious, what kind of edge retention is typical on these axes? The edge on mine is beat up a bit more than I thought it would be for no more work that I did with it. Most of the splits were done with the log to be split resting on a stump. Only a handful of pieces were challenging. I happened to look at the edge after maybe just 3 or 4 pieces, and already I could see it was starting to look a little nibbled. I'm sure I can stone the edge back into shape, but is that kind of wear normal for these axes? I can't decide if this is par for the course or if I got an axe that's maybe a little soft. I'm sure the heat treatment on these axe heads is completely automated and dialed in. Makes me wonder if the cutting edge initially suffers from a touch of decarburization; I wonder if it improves once it's been sharpened a few times and that outermost layer of steel is removed. Thanks for any thoughts.

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  2. Researcher1

    Researcher1 Member

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    Pittsburgh PA
    Mine is chewed up a little bit but doesn't seem to be affecting it at all. I have had mine since jan 2012 and have used it a lot.
  3. Mr A

    Mr A Minister of Fire

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    I read some of the reviews on Amazon. Some recommend buying the sharpener and touching up the edge out of the box. I did this and it split better.
  4. ironguy

    ironguy New Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I expected it would get dinged up a little; I just didn't expect it so quickly. It gave me pause, I guess. But it does do a very nice job splitting the wood. It's a far cry from the axe I was using. It wasn't a splitting axe, so the work was twice as hard. At least.
  5. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut Minister of Fire

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    I too got the sharpener and it does touch it up nice.
    You can really get it very sharp. I ran my leather glove
    down it and it cut it open like paper. Missed my finger.:)
  6. bboulier

    bboulier Feeling the Heat

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    NE Virginia
    The Fiskar's axes do get a little beat up, but sharpen up fine. Highly recommend the sharpener. Easy to use and does a good job.
  7. ironguy

    ironguy New Member

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    Thanks for your thoughts guys. I think this axe is a very nice tool. I'm not going to worry about the little dings in the edge. It sharpens up pretty well, and it sure does a nice job splitting wood.
  8. colin.p

    colin.p Burning Hunk

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    Ottawa Canada
    Maybe I'm not holding my tongue right, but after 2 years and the better part of a cord of various kinds of wood, I have yet to put even the hint of a nick in it. I did, however, buy the sharpener, but I really don't think it puts any magic edge on it. Maybe it does?_g
  9. ironguy

    ironguy New Member

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    Wow. No kidding. I've chopped a couple of cords already, and the edge is plenty nicked.
  10. Scols

    Scols Member

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    Springs New York
    The edges do get nicked with minimal splitting. As far as sharpeners, I prefer the accusharp to the fiskars sharpener. I think the accusharp gives a much better edge and when the little stones inside the sharpener wear down you can either turn them around or replace them.
  11. new_wood

    new_wood Member

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    Lebanon, Ohio
    Scols, do you happen to remember where you purchased the accusharp? Thanks.
  12. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    I've split about 1/4 cord of White Pine, green and wet, and sappy - I hit the ground at least a couple of times and on examination I could see a couple of dings in the edge. A few passes on a stone and it looks fine. I think it is a great splitting axe and while Pine is "soft" it isn't particularly easy to split.
  13. Mr A

    Mr A Minister of Fire

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    Some of the Amazon reviews mention the axe being made of "soft" metal, similar to chef knives. What does "soft" metal mean? The axe is light weight, so a sharp edge, and it's balance enable it to split better than a heavier maul. I'm guessing "soft" metal is a forging process that is easily sharpened?
  14. mtneer

    mtneer Member

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    The edge on mine was pretty weak at first. It would get dings in it just hitting a round the wrong way. Give it a few sharpenings and it will be solid (as long as you don't hit concrete). I haven't had to touch mine up in 4+ cords of splitting.
  15. ironguy

    ironguy New Member

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    I've got the Fiskars sharpener on order. Thus far I've been using a couple of slipstones that I use to sharpen carving tools. They work fine, but I think the sharpener will be more convenient.

    What those people mean by soft is that the edge deforms, or rolls, as opposed to chipping, which happens if it's been left too hard and is brittle.

    mtneer----I kind of suspected just what you say. I had no idea how much grinding was done after heat treatment, but the way the edge got damaged so easily, it made me wonder if there wasn't a layer of decarburized steel there that would get removed in a few sharpenings.
  16. Scols

    Scols Member

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    Most hardware stores and bait and tackle shops carry them. Im sure amazon has them too. I use the one with the blue handle.
  17. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    I use, not often, a two sided (course and medium I think) puck shaped stone.

    Interesting discussion on metallurgy (whatever that is)... I like the idea that the factory shipped edge is not the fully hardened heat treated due to the thinness of that small area (different temperature?) during heat treatment. Maybe I misunderstand : ( I like the idea that the edge gets stronger with sharpening. : )
  18. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    I use either 220 grit diamond stone,followed by washita or soft arkansas soaked in water for a few strokes.Wear heavy leather glove & pay close attention while doing this.I got a minor 'bite' a few months back,first time wasnt wearing gloves & had a small cut on finger that took a couple days to close up.Could've been much worse,that edge is like a razor!
  19. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    Stop it you are scaring me, oh, yes, that's the value of telling us.

    I worry more about a miss that comes around to my feet/legs. I have the X27 and am tall and mostly chop on a block/large round, and keep my feet apart - and I don't sharpen my axe to razor sharp, still works well and is still is a scary weapon/tool.
  20. tbuff

    tbuff Feeling the Heat

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    Central NJ
    Believe it or not, I find my little X7(kindling ax) more intimidating then my X25! Maybe cause I'm doing more tedious chopping or maybe because its easy to forget that a small, lightweight ax can do some serious damage to a misplaced finger..
  21. ironguy

    ironguy New Member

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    I find hatchets a little unnerving. It's so easy to get it back into your legs or feet; or to lose your grip. I don't have any problems at all with an axe. I'm 6'1". A 36" handle is a good fit for me. I swing it a lot like I would a sledgehammer, as if I want to drive something straight down. I never have a problem with it wanting to rotate around into my feet or legs. I split everything on a stump.

    BTW, full disclosure, I'm no metallurgist. I'm just a metalworker who knows some stuff about the materials he works with. My main concern with this axe was just to see what other people's experiences with it were like. Its edge was far more fragile initially than I'd expected it to be. There's a lot me you'd have to know, to know for sure why that is. Like I don't have any idea what tool steel the head is made of.
  22. bboulier

    bboulier Feeling the Heat

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    I am not sold on the X7. It is nice for some tasks (e.g. chopping branches), but I don't think it is a good splitting axe for kindling. It is too "slippery". The axe doesn't stick in a preliminary cut. It slides out. I find choking up on the X25 (my favorite axe) or the X27 works much better.
  23. Mr A

    Mr A Minister of Fire

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    Lifetime warranty is good, if the company is still in business. Looking at this tool, there would be no way to replace the handle if it ever broke.
  24. NW Walker

    NW Walker Member

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    I do find them a bit soft, but it also translates to easy to sharpen for me. I prefer the x25 for general duty, and only use the x27 for knocking the big rounds apart. I most often use the technique of flopping the axe on it's side on impact, so it's important to me that it is sharp. I think that technique is harder on the edge as well. Still, they are by far my favorite tools for splitting. I'll never go back to a heavy maul.
  25. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon Minister of Fire

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    Like any other edge on any cutting tool, a quick run on the grinder and it is good as new. Holds an edge amazingly well for me, a nick or two is expected now and then. just grind it out

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