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FLUSH MOUNT STOVE?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by bluefrier, Jul 4, 2008.

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  1. bluefrier

    bluefrier Feeling the Heat

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    Newbie to this forum needs help. Would a fan blowing into the firebox cavity help to circulate more heat into the room? See photo

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  2. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    Looks neat, nice. Hope you have a block-off plate where the chimney of the stove goes through the old fireplace damper area.

    I'd think a fan would be helpful, the challenge is to find one that looks good. A low profile cage type fan such as is used on some inserts would be nice, something that would sit low in front of the stove and push air back under the fire box, and hence out the top and sides.

    EDIT: does the stove manufacturer offer a factory designed/fitted fan? That would be my first choice, if expensive, may run a couple of hundred.
  3. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    As Jerry says...that installation just cries out for a block-off plate. Look into the cavity above the stove where the stovepipe begins its vertical journey...is there some sort of solid (sheet metal) plate that fits tightly around the stovepipe and snugly into the masonry structure? Without it, you're just losing massive amounts of the heat you're looking for your stove to produce right up the chimney. Without the block-off plate, blowing air into the cavity surrounding the stove would simply exacerbate the problem. Ideally, a fan designed and purpose-built by the stove manufacturer mounted directly to the stove is the best bet for getting more warm air directed out from the stove and mixing/diffusing into the room. Blowing at the stove from the front, or into the cavity from the side of the stove would probably be my last choice. Rick
  4. bluefrier

    bluefrier Feeling the Heat

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    Thank you for your replies. The damper does have a block off plate. btw i did my own install. it is fully lined, sealed at the top and bottom. Englander does have a fan but i would hate to have the power cord running across the hearth. I would rather use a fan on an as needed basis if possibly. The stove does heat the living and dining room (adjacent) very well but on really cold days the stove could use some help.

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  5. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    Nice job, after my advice I admit I don't have a block-off plate on my insert installation, but the liner is sealed at the top and the liner is insulated. If you want to gain some additional transfer of heat, I'd guess a small fan temporarily placed to blow low, under, the stove would push more heat out.

    That must be one big fireplace, I'm not familiar with the Englander 13NC, but I know putting a stove in my fireplace didn't look good, and I have a large fireplace.
  6. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Looks and sounds like you did a bang-up job on that installation...very nice! We have a freestanding Lopi sitting on a hearth in front of a decommissioned & sealed masonry fireplace. We have the factory blower kit on the stove, and we're very glad we do. Yes, the power cord runs along the hearth, and I too was a bit concerned about that. Put something in front of it (fireplace tools, whatever), and we've found we don't even notice it anymore. I'll post a pic. Rick

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  7. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    You cut that poor lil 13's legs off! :wow:

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  8. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    A fan is a definite help. Especially as high up as your damper block-off plate is located. The heat has to build up and then either be absorbed into the masonry or roll out of the fireplace opening. I have the blower on the back of my 30 and it shoots the air over the top of the stove out into the room and makes a big difference. I am going to have to drag my stove back out someday because the blower had a bad bearing out of the box. I kept trying to convince myself the sound was just vibration in the housing until it was too late to put the touch on Mike for warranty. As an old helicopter mechanic I know a bad bearing when I hear it but I kept trying to convince myself otherwise.

    Now about that silicone you sealed the liner with at the block-off plate. Keep an eye on it. The first time that liner gets up to eight hundred degrees on startup with a good load the silicone is going to vaporize. After the stink dies down, re-seal that spot with furnace cement. It won't crap out until around 2,000 degrees. Using silicone to seal around the edge of the plate was fine. That part won't get that hot but the liner darn sure will.

    And don't let the family stand around breathing the vapors when it does vaporize. Nasty stuff those vapors.
  9. bluefrier

    bluefrier Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks BB. I will take your advice on tha block off plate silicone
  10. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Another thing you can do to get more heat out into the room, and I am going to do it this year, is a lower block off plate even with the lintel of the fireplace. The convection from the rear heat shields of the Englander stoves is really good. The problem when they are installed in a fireplace is that the warm air from the rear shield convection slams into the back of the bricks over the lintel. I am putting in a lower block off plate even with the lintel so that the air just flows right out into the room. I tested it last season with just a sheet of aluminum foil and it as different as daylight and dark as to the heat that moves out into the room.
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