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forrester model 280

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Chopper, Apr 21, 2006.

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  1. Chopper

    Chopper Member

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    I've recently obtained a forester model 280 anybody ever heard of it? Not crazy about the looks of it but the price was right. Would I be wasting my time installing this model intill I can get the one I want? I really like the soap stone ones but don't like the prices.

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  2. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    I believe you picked up one of those 70's stoves. Probably un- listed and questionable being able to obtain a permit to install it.
    I think your question and being a bit unsure says it all. A better question would be,,how safe would this stove be in opperation?
    Personally one would be better off finding a more modern stove. We here can educate you as to what to look for in finding one
  3. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    I think this was made by the US Stove company. They are still in business.

    See: http://www.usstove.com/Downloads/Literature/1821.pdf

    These were tested and listed stoves (UL), but probably not epa. The current lit shows them EPA exempt, which means a high air to fuel ratio, although one mode is EPA approved.

    It is a steel stove, patterned after the original "air tights".

    So, yes, I have heard of them and yours should be OK at least in terms of safety. It will need some care in order to burn clean so make certain you educate yourself in proper burning techniques.
  4. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

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    Craig, sometimes your stove knowledge amazes even me!
  5. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Actually, didn't take too much for this one....I right away guessed that it was US Stove or the old Atlanta stove, and instead of mentioning both, I googled Forrester Wood Stove and saw it was US.

    So actually, it is more that I know a little and google fills in the rest!

    I was thinking of the woodsman and the huntsman, these were Atlanto stoves! One of them was cast and one was steel.

    Well, most of us are dying off. Luckily I started young, so would probably win any stove trivia game (but lose all sport, movies and tv ones).
  6. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    Boy if you started young then what did I do? I've been at it since I was 18. (currently only 7 years but it's a start)
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Didn't cha know? Craig helped Ben develop the Franklin stove. :)
  8. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    I doubt that if Craig had helped develop it it would have been alot more efficient.
  9. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

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    Craig, this is a torch I'd be happy to take. I've been studying stove manuals, manufacturer literature and other sources since I was 8. I used to make my mother take me to all the area stove dealers and amaze them with how much I knew about their stoves. I have fireside advisors from vermont castings from WAY WAY back in my collection. So don't worry, it's not an entirely dying breed. :)
  10. HarryBack

    HarryBack New Member

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    geeez...and I thought I was bad collecting National Geographics! My wife hates them, they take up an entire bookcase in the den! Benn collecting since I was 10...all the way back to 1926.
  11. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I read an issue of Mother Earth News once. Does that count?
  12. Chopper

    Chopper Member

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    After doing some reseach... my freind finding the manual.... it is a plate steel stove claims to be "air tight". It's from the seventies and in very good shape.Not even a cracked fire brick.The clearances are huge 36 inches all the way around but this can be dealt with.My thoughts are this stove should be bannished to the garage and wait to get a "real" stove.After this winter I just want some relief .Any input would be appreciated
  13. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

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    I have from about 1952 to current. Yes, I know that I was born in 1985. My grandpa passed them along to me! haha
  14. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    First of all clearance reduction enclosures can be built to reduce the clearances to 18". Since you have the instructions booklet please provide more specifics concerning the stove in question. Is the stove Ul approved? It is possible this stove is a decent usable stove.

    Naturally it will not burn as clean and EPA stoves and it will consume more wood. But with dry wood and learning how to control it much of the polution issues could be reduces
  15. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Hey Elk,

    I haven't looked at clearance charts for while, but can't they be reduced 66% (2/3) with as simple as sheet metal spaced 1 inch from wall? That was the original generic NFPA.....66% from original wall. Of course, pipe clearance has to figure in, but pipe heat shields are usually for 50%, so piple can be as little as 9".

    Here is the older NFPA table we have on Hearth.com
    http://www.hearth.com/content/images/uploads/nfpachart1.jpg

    I would have no qualms using a stove like that when I comes to basic safety - rather the biggest concerns are the dirty burning and possibly chimney fires, etc. - If you are an educated burner you can avoid this by using the stove with lots of air and hot fires. Such a stove should not be smoldered often.
  16. kd460

    kd460 Feeling the Heat

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    This is good stuff as I have a "buddy" in a similiar situation. Older stove, in good shape, experienced at burning. Burned often at his old house, but since moving, his new house has no "wood burning capabilities" and he really misses it. He came accross a wood burning stove (heck, I think it might even be the same model!), and wants to get it up and running.

    He's no idiot (except after a few beers!), so following directions/tips/information from the experienced folks here you would be a big help. I'm gonna follow this thread closely and pass on the info to him.

    Hey Chopper, it sure would be interesting to see if your manual shows how to reduce the clearances. And does any one know if there is a way to get the clearances even closer than 18"? Say ceramic tile on the wall with the tile installed on durock or wonderboard with a gap from the wall (maybe by using steel studs?) I guess the manual for the stove will be the bible.

    Gonna do search for him right now. Chopper, if I find anything good I'll post it here. Good Luck, KD
  17. Chopper

    Chopper Member

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    It would be nice if the manual would give me all the answers but it don't.Idid notice that it says do not use in mobile home what does this mean? The manual says copywrite 1978.If it was ul approved would it state this in the manual or on the stove?
  18. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

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    Wouldn't matter, UL listings generally expire within 20 years.


    Not being able to be installed in a mobile home means it can't be installed in a mobile home. I could be wrong, but the things necessary for mobile home installation usually must include an outside combustion air connection as well as a means of being anchored to the floor, if I'm not mistaken.
  19. seaken

    seaken Minister of Fire

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    Yep, and also a specialized chimney and connector pipe. A stove has to be specifically tested for mobile home. This stove in question was not tested for that purpose.

    In some localities it is still acceptable to install "unlisted" stoves when complying with the NFPA 211 standards for unlisted stoves. I can't say for sure, but it sounds like US stove never went through the UL listing process with that stove. The unlisted clearance is 36". The hearth also has to be properly prepared. (And yes, these clearances can be reduced as already mentioned).

    I suggest you learn to burn hot fires and keep your chimney clean. This stove will be a lot more work than a modern clean-burning stove but it could be done safely if you pay attention to the counsel here. The chimney system will be the weakest link (assuming you adhere to the clearance requirements) so make sure you have a good and properly installed chimney system - preferrably a Class A or a Type HT insulated stainless liner. Good wood is a must.Well-seasoned and dry. Bring it indoors a few days before putting it in the stove. Some kind of staging of your wood supply would be in order.

    I would agree with Elk and consider waiting for a good deal on a new-technology stove. But it's up to you. Whatever you decide, remember that creosote fires are dangerous to your health. Be careful.

    Sean
  20. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Craig again your are right 66% reduction can be achieved witha properly built enclosure and double wall connector pipe of an approved pipe heat shield. at no point the reduction can be less than one foot unless the stove is listed as such with a heat shield .
    Part of my threat was to error on safety side. It is hard to apply modern code to ancient stoves. The codes at the time of this stove only allowed 50% reduction. A case could be made that more modern stoves can be reduced, but applying these codes to older stoves not tested, I used the code requirements pertaining to the age of the stove 1970's

    I used the 1982 code book concerning this stove In Canada they require 48" from combustiables as their base for older stoves.
    I think the question here is can modern code be applied to stoves this age? or should one apply the older code requirements to relfect the time era? Remember by today's code these stoves can not be installed because they are un listed so is using modern code one can not selectively choose only part of code to fit the situation. but using modern code all factors must be considered?
  21. kd460

    kd460 Feeling the Heat

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    I'm not trying to contradictory (sp?), but I find it interesting "that all UL listings expire after 20 years". That kind of stinks. Does that mean the refrigerator that I have in my garage is garbage? What about the TV in my basement that works fine? If something where to happen with that fridge or TV and cause a fire, will I be screwed because the UL listing expired?

    Yes I know, a wood burning stove is a different product, and safety is more of an issue. I would just hate to see a useable stove go to waste. But, on that same scenario, if something where to go wrong with that stove, the insurance company may raise an eyebrow about the fact that an obsolete stove was installed, and I guess there is no way for it to pass inspection just because of it's age. If installed with no inspection, then that is another problem. Especially if something where to happen and it's time to file claim. Hmmm.

    Looks like if anything, that puppy needs to go in the garage. Need to pass this info on to my buddy. Yes, his stove is the very same model. He will be disappointed.

    Chopper, are you sure there an no clearances listed in the manual? If you do choose to install it, are you capable of cleaning the chimney on a regular basis? Are you an experienced wood burner? Just curious. KD
  22. Chopper

    Chopper Member

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    The clearances posted are 36 inches allthe way around .I figure I could cut the down to at least 20 inches with a heat sheild. Can any one tell me what year stove companies started making "modern" stoves are they that much better.....cleaner.....safer? I'm capable of cleaning my chimney.
  23. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    For most it started in 1988 in anticipation of the 1990 EPA wood stove regs. The regs required all stoves ( there are exceptions)
    sold in USA to be tested and certified to be at least 63% effecient and emit no more than 8.5 grams of particulates per hour cat stoves 5.5 So if in the used stove market late 1980's that have approval from Oregon to 1990 WPA label forward For instance I have a VC Intrepid II Approved for use in the state of Oregon it was manufactured in 1987 These specs are the same as the EPA adopted 3 years later. With carefull searching one can come up with a decent priced EPA approved stove new or used
  24. Chopper

    Chopper Member

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    OK you guy have provided me with alot of great info.Let say the cheapest SOB on the face of the earth was going to buy a new stove? I think I've narrowed it down to either a vc or a jotul. Don't really know if I should get a "cat" or not. House is about 1300 sq ft.I live in the middle of Michigan so it's plenty cold.Any feedback would be great
  25. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    If you want cheap while maintaining quality look at Dutchwest. Still the VC technology in the non-cat and you can get one for around 1000.00. They don't top load but do have a side load door. The non cat version has been around in one incarnation or another for approx. 30 years. They introduced the non cat about 2 years ago. Both are good solid stoves and in my opinion one of the best buys on the market today. Another thing I like about them is the convection chambers are built in, not provided by a heat shield.
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