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Geez, was this overfired?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by hardwood715, Oct 20, 2006.

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  1. hardwood715

    hardwood715 Feeling the Heat

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  2. ourhouse

    ourhouse Minister of Fire

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    I have to say it got a little hot
  3. babalu87

    babalu87 New Member

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    One thing for sure, the guys lumbago would never hurt.
    You see where the desk is!!!!!!!!!
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Actually those kind of "overfirings" were a pretty normal occurance with the old heavy plate stoves. Not that it made it right, but there weren't any guidelines on how hot get a stove, or not. Just the "don't let it glow" rule. Where do you think the clearance to combustibles rules came from. Furniture three feet from the stove bursting into flames, that is where it came from.

    The big Sierra has run happily at 800 to 1,000 degree surface temp for twenty years. But the paint didn't combust. It won't anymore because I now know better, but had no reason to know better before the Forum. During the runaway burn, documented in another post, it hit twelve hundred for the first time. Dusted two inches of new Stovebright paint in the very center of the top. Scared the crap out of me, not for the stove, but for that new liner.

    One thing I do know from looking at the newer stoves, except the iron and soapstone ones, they would only do it once. And I would kinda like to see what happens to that soapstone at 1,200.

    The old dirty burners had a whole bunch of thick boiler plate in'em.
  5. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

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    Yeah and meanwhile that hearth is probably nothing but patio pavers sitting on top of carpet.
  6. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    There is that.
  7. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    O' Thats a wood stove ?

    I thought it was a FORGE . hahaha............
  8. berlin

    berlin New Member

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    "Hope no one dies buying this"

    please. that type of stove is solid, to get that paint white takes only 1200-1500º F temps, mild steel melts at over 2600º F. to say somthing like that is uninformed at the least.
  9. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

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    It won't hurt that stove. Built like a tank. If it makes you feel better, put a fresh coat of paint on it. Even the cracked fire bricks are ok until they crumble and fall out. Nothing to get excited about. It's not a dainty little thing like today's stoves.
  10. hardwood715

    hardwood715 Feeling the Heat

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    I humbly removed that statement. yes that is a bit much, sorry if I scared anyone! But good to know that my steel stove will tolerate some high heat, not that I would want to test it .
  11. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    today's stoves are " dainty" ?!?!
  12. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Especially the red ones.
  13. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    :p awe..........go back to bed BB . %-P
  14. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

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    "Dantier" than that thing! Heck, the house would burn down around it before you ever got it hot enough to hurt it. Then hook a chain on it and drag it down the road to heat (or burn down if you don't know how to use it) the next house!
  15. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

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  16. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Ahhh, ha, ha, ha! Quit it guys, your killin' me. :lol:

    Them old hunks of iron could fall out of the back of a truck and the only thing it would hurt is the darn road. But man, if the paint is now ash white............I would have to reconsider my burning technique (or lack there of).

    On the other hand---- "look mom, no creosote"!

    Jags
  17. DavidV

    DavidV New Member

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    Look ma no creasote...... Did I mention why I was so gung ho to get a steel liner t his year. I had the chimney swept and the guy told me I didn't have any more glazing because it appeared I'd had a fire. I reswept it myself and when I was cleaning out the smoke shelf there was some "styrofoam peanut" looking ash chunks that I can only assume are burnt up glazing. Gotta love creosote.
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