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Generator question

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by WellSeasoned, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    I got a briggs & stratton storm responder 5500/ 8250 starting watts portable. I plan on keeping it on my deck that is open but has an awning. No where in the manual does it say that it cannot get wet, but looking online there are some people that say it just can't get wet.

    Rain is going to blow in, and its going to get wet. Is this okay? Thx

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  2. tsmith

    tsmith Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2009
    Messages:
    758
    Loc:
    Kutztown, PA
    Mine has always set outside in the rain or snow when I run it during a storm, never had a problem.
    WellSeasoned likes this.
  3. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    Thx, it won't be in direct rain, but its going to get wet. I know you'll have yours out. Your in this storms direct path too.
  4. tsmith

    tsmith Minister of Fire

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    Sep 13, 2009
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    758
    Loc:
    Kutztown, PA
    Yea, my only problem is that I work in the water plant at our municipality and I will most likely be at work dealing with flooding etc. Hopefully my wife will be able to hold down the fort, she don't like hooking up the genny etc.
  5. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler Minister of Fire

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    1,847
    Loc:
    Massachusetts
    Just a suggestion.....I would try to keep the generator off to the side of the house...best place for safety would be in an area that winds would carry the fumes away from your house. I know that the deck is probably convenient, but you might be better off with it in an area that you don't have the fumes being trapped under an awning and seeping into your home. (I know I know....worry wort here) But after being out of power for 11 days during the ice storm of 2008 I would rather have you safe. The water shouldn't be that much of an issue,...but could you perhaps just get a few saw horses and throw a sheet of plywood or something else you have laying around over the top?

    Have the same genny and it served me well...just make sure that you change the oil after the first 10 hours....it gets pretty ugly and I think thats the specs of the one I have.

    Good luck. I have some close relatives in the Gilbertsville, PA area so I am staying dialed in to your area.

    Stay Safe
    WellSeasoned likes this.
  6. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    Thx wood hauler! Your not a worry wort, its safety, and thats a good thing. During the height of the storm, if the power is out, and I need to use it, the winds will be strong enough to keep the fumes moving away. After that, if we still dont have power, it will be moved much farther away from the house. I actually have family in wyomissing, and occasionally go through gilbertsville, and I know they are in for a rough next couple days. I wish for every ones safety. Thx, be well
  7. Retired Guy

    Retired Guy Feeling the Heat

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    Loc:
    Cape Vincent, NY
    I'd worry more about the awning.
  8. FrankMA

    FrankMA Member

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    Jul 18, 2008
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    Loc:
    Merrimack Valley - Northeastern MA
    DWH - Great suggestion about the saw horses and a sheet of plywood. I just bought a generator last month and thought about doing a teepee style cover with 2 pieces of plywood to keep it out of the elements but I like your idea better. Thanks for the suggestion!
  9. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    Jan 12, 2009
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    2,348
    Loc:
    SW Virginia
    You'll want to make sure no water can get into the fuel tank. Many have a manual vent on the gas cap. Water could get suck in there if it puddled up somehow. You may want to at least put a rain shield of some sort (e.g. Dixie cup) over that. It just needs to let air flow in.

    You won't want water getting near the spark plug area if you can avoid that either.

    I have no idea how it might affect the genset though.
  10. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    I am, its an aluminum roof and mostly well attached on 3 sides, but its aluminum and can tear off easily. I added a ratchet strap on the more exposed corner for added support.
  11. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    Schenectady, NY
    Chain the generator down. If there are a lot of people without power they tend to walk away.

    Matt
  12. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    Chained to the floor of the deck.
  13. jonwright

    jonwright Member

    Joined:
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    137
    Loc:
    Little Rock, AR
    Mine has a tank on the top so although it's been running in the rain you DO have to worry about getting water in the fuel. Have that tshirt.

    What no one has mentioned yet is that electricity and water aren't good combinations. I'd worry about checkin on the Ginny Ina a puddle and having an arc. Yeah, there are circuit breakers but I'd rather not chance it.

    If ya have to run it be sure it isn't where water is going to puddle IMHO.

    Sawhorse a plywood is a good idea. Not sure how wind resistant that is.

    Front porch? Concrete area that's dry? Carport (not attached garage)?

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