Glass cleaner

Elfin Posted By Elfin, Sep 9, 2008 at 5:02 AM

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  1. Elfin

    Elfin
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    Apr 21, 2008
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    We did our first burnoffs of the new PE Alderlea T5 this summer, and last week the morning temps were low enough that we actually got to use it! I am loving this stove! So much nicer than our old woodstove or pellet stove... the way this thing burns is amazing! It really holds the coals and the stove itselfs retains heat for such a good long time.

    Anyway, on to my question... the user's manual says we should use fireplace glass cleaner... is this really necessary? I don't anticipate a lot of dirty glass, but don't want to invalidate my warranty by using a product I shouldn't. Typically I would probably just use vinegar or ammonia and water, but could this possibly be damaging and a bad idea?
     
  2. R&D Guy

    R&D Guy
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    Apr 25, 2007
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    I've always just used Windex and newspaper to clean soot off of neoceram and tempered glass. Never noticed any issues.
     
  3. karl

    karl
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    Apr 9, 2007
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    Take a wet paper towel and dip it in the ashes and rub he glass with it. Then take another wet paper towel and wipe it off.

    This works great when you get smoke stains on the glass, better than any glass cleaner.
     
  4. savageactor7

    savageactor7
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    Jan 25, 2008
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    We use bottled water with a paper towel...I was told some tap water can leave a haze on the windows so be careful. If you do it regularly in the morning when the stove is the coolest it takes only a minute and you'll have showroom glass all day. btw it's best to use leather gloves when doing this.
     
  5. cmonSTART

    cmonSTART
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    Nov 29, 2007
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    Windex and paper towels work fine for me. Seems to get the stuff off pretty easily. If it happens to get really thick I use a razor blade to scrape it off after its wet.
     
  6. colebrookman

    colebrookman
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    Feb 7, 2008
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    I've used all of the above but usually come back to Rutland glass cleaner. A little goes a long ways wiped off with crumbled newspaper. Glass should be cold to use. Also a nice hot fire should keep the glass reasonably clean. No wet wood.
    Ed
     
  7. webby3650

    webby3650
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    Sep 2, 2008
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    I have tried most products out there and have found that ash works as good as any. But I use a terry cloth rag, which is naturally abrasive and stays that way.
     
  8. Tfin

    Tfin
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    Jul 24, 2007
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    Count me in with the windex and paper towel crew.
     
  9. Henz

    Henz
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    Mar 23, 2006
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    I went to my local Ace Store and bought the soot glass cleaner. I think it was cheaper than windex even. Works well
     
  10. jadm

    jadm
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    Dec 31, 2007
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    I'm of the razor blade crowd. No mess and cleans nicely.
     
  11. Jfk4th

    Jfk4th
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    Feb 8, 2007
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    Sign me up for another vote for local Ace soot glass cleaner, works great.

    Hey Adirondack, have snow up there yet :cheese: At least the black flies are gone, right?
     
  12. Henz

    Henz
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    actually, last weeks warm weather brought the skeeters back. I would expect them to be gone this week as we are expecting a cold snap!
     
  13. myzamboni

    myzamboni
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    I do this, or use Simple Green.
     
  14. hookspacken

    hookspacken
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    Nov 8, 2006
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    I use some damp newspaper dipped in wood ash , then I use a damp paper towel to shine her up. Works like a champ!
     
  15. Elfin

    Elfin
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    Apr 21, 2008
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    Thanks, everybody... glad to know that there is no true necessity to use the special cleaners!
     
  16. ScottF

    ScottF
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    Aug 7, 2008
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    How about a way to clean the mica on an antique stove. It is extremely thin and fragile. Anyone ever heard of how to clean that?
     
  17. savageactor7

    savageactor7
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    Jan 25, 2008
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    We had mica or isenglass (sp) in our Franklin stove...just be careful and get a small block of wood to put a little counter pressure on the outside. Cleaning that is almost like performing heart surgery...I one broke a piece out of it and the stove burnt fine till I replaced it...just say'en.
     
  18. bluefrier

    bluefrier
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    Jul 3, 2008
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    No cleaner can compare to #0000 steel wool.
     
  19. Elfin

    Elfin
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    Apr 21, 2008
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    Oh, I'm a #0000 steel wool addict! It is great for cleaning glass and ceramic tile. Of course the user's manual for my stove says "no abrasives" -
     
  20. Randyb

    Randyb
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    Jul 27, 2008
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    Tried a couple of the things mentioned here couldn't get it completely clean (didn't try the #0000 steel wool) ended up Mr Clean Magic Eraser dry got it spotless
     
  21. TreeTrunk

    TreeTrunk
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    Sep 9, 2008
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    Burning the stove real hot every now and then seems to keep my glass clean.
     
  22. fossil

    fossil
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    Prob'ly OK with #0000 steel wool pads, as reported here, although sometimes they come with a light oil in them to inhibit rust (they are, after all, steel). I use 'em for wood & metal cleaning/finishing, and like them very much. They're pretty gentle. Whatever you do, DON'T use a "Scotchbrite" pad, thinking that it's similar to the steel wool. I scratched the glass windshield of one of my cars some years ago using one of those evil things. :shut: On the other hand, I've used them to good effect cleaning up lightly rusted metal in preparation for paint. Rick
     
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