Gloves when splitting?

basswidow Posted By basswidow, Dec 12, 2011 at 7:06 PM

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  1. basswidow

    basswidow
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    Oct 17, 2008
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    Do you wear gloves when swinging your Fiskar Axe? Any glove recommendations? I like gloves when stacking and moving wood.

    When swinging the axe - I usually do not wear gloves. I like a firm grip on the handle that I get without gloves. It does cause my ring finger to get pinched. Perhaps my fingers are fat. I've solved this by removing my wedding band while splitting - being mindful not to lose it. I usually stick it down into my shoe.

    I am wondering if a batting glove would work?
     
  2. Gary_602z

    Gary_602z
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    Only if you are swinging it horizontally, and then you might get in trouble from somebody! :cheese:

    Gary
     
  3. thinkxingu

    thinkxingu
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    I swear by Atlas Fit gloves, but recently I tried a pair of kevlar gloves from my local Fastenal. Were $7 or so, but seem to be holding up well. The Fastenal version of the Fit lasted two days.

    S
     
  4. fossil

    fossil
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    I wear gloves when handling a bunch of wood...running the hydraulic splitter, tossing, stacking. I normally don't wear gloves when hand splitting, unless it's really cold when I'm doing it. So, when hand splitting, gloves are just to help keep my hands warm, but everything else gloves are to protect my hands from the perils of processing firewood. Rick
     
  5. Thistle

    Thistle
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    I only wear gloves when its cold,handling Shagbark Hickory or dealing with thorny shrubs/vines etc. 27+ yrs in construction & 30+ in the woods have made my hands leathered with calluses.
     
  6. CTYank

    CTYank
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    Gloves are almost mandatory handling black locust splits. The splinters are like tool steel, but just about the same color as leathery skin. Makes them hard to find & remove. (At least red oak is a bit darker.)
    With some woods, you learn quickly not to let your hand slide along the grain, but still they can get you.
    Make sure your tetanus is up-to-date.
     
  7. golfandwoodnut

    golfandwoodnut
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    I now wear gloves almost all the time when splitting and stacking wood. Let's face it, in order to get the wood into splitting position you are handling it, often lifting it, so what is the difference between splitting and stacking. when i don't wear gloves my hands get really very callused, which is Ok, although the wife doesn't like it very much. i like to just wear the inexpensive western cotton gloves as they feel really good, but wear out quickly. I have worn just regular work gloves and even the rubber gloves with the cloth backing. They all wear out quickly, but when you can buy 10 pair for about $7 at harbor freight i don't worry about it.
     
  8. buggyspapa

    buggyspapa
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    I like gloves more and more as I get older. The grip is not as good, but they save the skin. A good set of pigskin or goatskin gloves give a decent grip and touch, but block a lot of the easy cuts, nicks and pinches. Put some vegetable oil on your hands before putting them on and they stay pretty supple. I have a pair of Stanley pigskin garden gloves that I bought out of a sale bin about five years ago that are finally starting to disintegrate. Shoveling snow, digging holes, pruning bushes, cutting wood - about the best thing you can get for coarse work and retain some feel.
     
  9. Dix

    Dix
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    I'm a glove fan, but with the horses, it's pretty mandatory. Uninsulated leather gloves in warmer weather, insulated when colder out. As my barn gloves wear down, they become my wood gloves. I get a little bit of extra mileage out of them.

    Werks fer me :)
     
  10. 76mark

    76mark
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    I bought a pair of Mechanix padded palm gloves about 2 month ago and love them. I was expecting them to last 1-2 tree jobs, but they're still going strong. They just seemed too soft to last, but I was completely wrong. Next time I see them I'm grabbing a few more pairs.
     
  11. WoodNStuff

    WoodNStuff
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    For a lot of work, I like not wearing gloves. For c/s/s I wear gloves most, if not all, of the time. When running any chainsaw, the gloves help with some of the vibration. When splitting and stacking, the gloves prevent nicks and cuts. They also protect against the bitterness of the cold, wind, rain, etc. My hands are my best tools. I need to take care of them.
     
  12. trailmaker

    trailmaker
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    I wear Atlas Therma-Fit gloves and wrist-wraps when I'm using the Fiskars.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    With my older school mauls (heavy with wooden handles) the gloves and wraps aren't as helpful but I usually wear them anyway. I think the high speed of the Fiskars combine with a synthetic handle is just a bit tougher on the body.
     
  13. seeyal8r

    seeyal8r
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    +1 !

    I just wear the cheap leather gloves from the feed store. Not even sure they have a brand. They are in a pile of gloves where you pick through left and right hands to find a pair that fit. They are all supposed to be XL but I need the biggest pair of the stack. I think they are $3 a pair. The right hand always wears out first for me with holes and the stitching comes apart. But not after quite a bit of abuse. $3 is cheap insurance.
     
  14. midwestcoast

    midwestcoast
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    I've settled on those type of gloves as well, Nitrile coated, mid-weight & whatever brand is in the store when I remember to pick up a 3 or 5 pack. They seem to feel more like bare skin on the Fiskars handle. Leathers wear-out just as fast or faster for me and cost more.
    Someone gave me a few pairs of the thicker, textured, rubber coated gloves & I could not safely swing an axe with those. Way too grippy.

    What's the wrist wrap for?
     
  15. trailmaker

    trailmaker
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    I just tried the straps on a whim and they really seem to reduce or eliminate the wrist pain I used to feel after splitting with the Fiskars. I don't know exactly how they help but I think they dampen vibrations that make it through my gloves.
     
  16. WoodNStuff

    WoodNStuff
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    I had been wondering the same thing. Thanks for the info.
     
  17. pyper

    pyper
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    My guess would be your grip on the axe is too tight. Tension causes pain.

    As far as gloves, I've become a huge fan of Nitrile coated gloves. I wear them for anything.
     
  18. muncybob

    muncybob
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    Love the nitrile gloves too. Helps me with my ever weakening grip and not bulky at all. Seem to last longer than cheapie leather work gloves.
     
  19. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford
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    I use the cheapo rubber (or something that look like it) coated cotton gloves.
     
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