Good Seasoned Wood Source in Seacoast NH? Anyone?

theothersully Posted By theothersully, Jan 22, 2009 at 7:48 PM

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  1. theothersully

    theothersully
    New Member 2.
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    Dec 18, 2008
    31
    0
    Loc:
    NH
    Does anyone have a good source for seasoned hardwood in the NH seacoast area, or within 50 miles of here?

    I need:

    *12" logs (or I can cut 24 inchers in half onsite with my saw)
    *Fairly small cross section
    *Can only take 1/4 cord at a time, but need to purchase that 1/4 cord more than once this year

    I am more than willing to pick up the wood. Delivery not necessary.

    Does anyone know of a place to get it? Anyone got a good wood guy?

    Thanks!
     
  2. backpack09

    backpack09
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 10, 2007
    554
    7
    Loc:
    Rochester, Mass
    If you have indoor wood storage, you sound like the perfect candidate for bio bricks / envi blocks and the such. A pallets worth of sawdust logs is roughly equal to a cord of seasoned hardwood, the largest of them (envi blocks) is 10" in length. If there is a distributor nearby you can pick them up yourself too.

    Otherwise, finding short orders of seasoned wood thought the year might be impossible, and or very costly.

    http://www.biopellet.net/ - biobricks
    http://www.enviblocks.com/ - envi blocks
     
  3. theothersully

    theothersully
    New Member 2.
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    Dec 18, 2008
    31
    0
    Loc:
    NH
    Uh oh...

    Wood is our primary source of heat. I'm from New England originally and remember the "good old days" up here.

    What boggles my mind is that while living aboard this boat (I live on a boat) in New York City and in Long Island, I had an *easier* time getting wood!!

    What happened up here? Why is there no 1/4 cords available, even if I'm willing to cut 24 inchers down to 12 inchers myself?

    The wood guys in Craigslist don't even return my calls. :(

    Guess I better sail to Miami next year and give wood heating a miss, even though I like it so much.

    I have only outdoor storage for wood, unfortunately, since I'm on a boat. The wood stays under a tarp.
     
  4. savageactor7

    savageactor7
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Jan 25, 2008
    3,708
    10
    Loc:
    CNY
    ^unfortunately wood processors don't cut 12" OR 24" They will for a valued customers but it's kind of a nuisance. Those bio bricks Backpack recommends would be a good solution for you ...hell you can even cut them lengthwise with a simple sheet rock hand saw in 20 seconds or less. I bet in HD of Lowes they're on sale now cause spring is right around the corner and they want the space for new product. No offense but I think it's a big mistake to dismiss them so quickly. Anyway good luck to you.
     
  5. theothersully

    theothersully
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 18, 2008
    31
    0
    Loc:
    NH
    Thanks for the second vote on the bio bricks. No offense taken at all. This is good information, as I didn't even know they used wood processor machines.

    I guess I may have a look at these things again. I tried them for a short period, but was very unsatisfied at how they burned compared to real wood. They would start extremely hot (hotter than real wood), then after an hour or two taper off to putting no heat at all out. Very uneven heat compared to real wood.

    I guess in a pinch (we have about a week's worth of wood left now), we should give them another look.

    Only problem is where to store them... I have no dry area.

    EDIT: The question my be solved. I'm paying 20 cents per KWH here for electricity. Using an electric heater is cheaper than buying bio bricks, lugging them around, trying to keep them dry and tending the fire. I'll sure miss my wood stove for the rest of the winter, but you can't argue with dollars. :)
     
  6. mainesuomi

    mainesuomi
    New Member 2.
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    Jan 24, 2009
    3
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    Loc:
    Western Maine
    You could look into a local construction site. They are fewer and far between with the local economy, but there are some sites where you could get construction scraps. You can check in with the building inspectors in the area and call on the sites. Most contractors are still having to pay to have that stuff hauled off in dumpsters. If you're willing to pay a bit, one of their guys might be willing to drop off a pallet load. The other avenue would be some of the local cabinet shops- they will sell scrap, and again, one of the guys in the shop would probably do a delivery for a small sum. Where are you moored?
     
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