1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Good thing for the stove, ran out of oil...

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by rkofler, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. rkofler

    rkofler Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    Messages:
    123
    Loc:
    Long Island
    Decided to go cod with my oil deliveries this year since I am not using as much, was always on auto fill. I knew the tank was getting low, guess I didn't realize how low. We need oil for dhw. My daughter went to take a shower last night, no hot water. Wife not happy, can't shower this morning. Kids ecstatic cause they didn't have to shower last night! (They are 4 and 7, hate showering)
    Scheduled a delivery for today, of course. My question is, will my oil burner fire right back up? I read a few articles stating that I might have to prime it to get the fuel flowing again? Hope this is not the case, I don't know much about oil burners. Might have to call in a tech.
    The good news, the house is at 72 this morning so at least my wife can't complain the house is cold.
    Lesson learned, don't think I will let the oil tank go below 1/4 again...

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,342
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    My limited experience is that you do have to prime, but the oil delivery guy is usually trained to handle this, and it only takes 5 minutes. Just be sure you catch him while he's there delivering, or leave a note on the fill spout for him and a door unlocked, if you'll not be home. He needs to get at the burner to do it.
    savageactor7 and harttj like this.
  3. NSDave

    NSDave Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    Messages:
    114
    Loc:
    Halifax NS Canada
    If it ran dry , you'll have to bleed the air of the line. Its usually simple unless your burner is higher than your tank for some reason; like in a mobile home; Generally all you need is a few rags, a small bucket; like a 1/2 gallon icecream bucket and the correct size wrench; some burners have a cove rover them you need to remove with a screwdriver. When I did this; I would back the fitting off on the oil line at the burner untill I got air; not all they way. It should gravity feed; when you get oil. tighten it up again. Alternatively you could run the burner; that varies by model, there should be a bleeder screw on that as well.
    * have someone at the shutoff for the oil just in case ; I have seen the fittings crack; you don't want an oil spill! *

    Be aware that you may have sucked crud from the bottom of the tank and clogged the nozzel or a filter.
  4. KodiakII

    KodiakII Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    419
    Loc:
    Eastern Ontario
    Forget the rag you will need about a pickle size jar to be on the safe side. You don't want to spill any of that dino juice. Riello (sp?) burners are a reddish orange color, you will need to take the cover off to get at the bleeder screw. Beckett burners are uncovered. On either one though you will see a pump on the side of your burner where the oil line comes into it. On it you will see a bleeder screw just like a brake bleeder on your vehicle. Loosen it just slightly with the proper size wrench, get the jar positioned under it and hit the reset button on your burner and loosen the bleeder screw (but don't remove it). Some air might come out but wait until you get a good stream of oil an snug the screw shut. the burner should fire right at that moment. If you wait too long the burner will time out because of no flame, you will have to wait a few seconds until it will let you reset again. Depending on how much air and where your furnace is in relation to the tank you might have to do this several times. Good luck.
    NortheastAl likes this.
  5. rkofler

    rkofler Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    Messages:
    123
    Loc:
    Long Island
    Thanks for the guidance everyone. I will probably ask if the driver can do this for me before I tackle myself.
    It is a Riello burner, fairly new. I am aware that it might have sucked in some crud from the bottom of the tank. I will probably just schedule a spring cleaning soon to be safe. Again, lesson learned...
  6. NortheastAl

    NortheastAl Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    Messages:
    676
    Loc:
    Putnam, NY
    Exactly how it's done. Adding some flexible clear plastic fuel line to the bleeder nipple will guide the oil into that pickle jar.

    Rkofler, if you are ever getting low and you need to add some fuel before it runs dry use diesel fuel until you can get a fill up. Have done this myself when I ran out.
    KodiakII likes this.
  7. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,473
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    Some Beckets have covers ( the one next door is black) and some Riello burners are Buderus blue.
  8. rkofler

    rkofler Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    Messages:
    123
    Loc:
    Long Island
    It is a Riello.
    Unfortunately I'm at work til 5, my wife is home with one of the kids who are sick.
    They told me oil delivery will be early afternoon. Is it worth a shot to have my wife try to reset without bleeding? There is only one line from tank to burner, and it is a pretty long run.

    Attached Files:

  9. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,473
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    Is the line to the tank in the floor or on the ceiling ?
    Do you have a tigerloop ?
  10. rkofler

    rkofler Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    Messages:
    123
    Loc:
    Long Island
    Not sure what a tigerloop is. The oil tank sits on the basement floor, same as oil burner. The line runs right along the basement floor.
  11. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,473
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    Looked at your pic better - it would be where your filter is.
    Running the line dry from running out usually needs to be bled.
    With a simpler system like you seem to have the driver might do it.
    My sister used to run out once a month buying the minimum.
    I lived too close. Just a reset never worked.
  12. rkofler

    rkofler Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    Messages:
    123
    Loc:
    Long Island
    Got lucky, I guess. Pressed reset one time. Fired up, stalled out. Fired itself back up and stayed on.
    Went down into basement about a half hour later and there was some water on the floor under and around the burner. Any guesses? I will definitely keep an eye on it.
  13. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,342
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    Is this a boiler or a hot air furnace? If air, do you have a humidifier system? If a boiler, was the water near the pressure relief valve?
  14. rkofler

    rkofler Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    Messages:
    123
    Loc:
    Long Island
    It's a boiler. Hard to tell, water was sort of evenly spread out around the unit. Excuse my ignorance, not positive I know what pressure relief valve is. There is a copper pipe that comes up, back and down the back, and is open. Assuming that is it. Seems like that is probably where water came from. If so, why did this happen upon restart? Should that be it, nothing to worry about?
  15. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,342
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    Well, what can happen (not necessarily what did happen) is that when your system cooled all of the water and air in the system contracts, and causes the boiler pressure to decrease. If you have an autofill valve (common these days), it will top your system off with a little more water, to maintain ideal pressure. Then, you restart the system, and as the water and air in the system heat and expand, the pressure builds. The pressure relief valve eventually spills a little water to keep the system at a safe operating level. Everything may just be operating as it should.

    I've seen this many times with water heaters in houses with a well and/or check valve upstream of the water heater, but since I just recently moved to my first house with an auto-fill valve, I've not witnessed it myself on a boiler. My previous boiler had a manual fill valve.

Share This Page